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Hazardous Substances at Moffett Field’s Hangar One: Challenges and Opportunities

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Hazardous Substances at Moffett Field’s Hangar One: Challenges and Opportunities

  1. 1. Hazardous Substances at Moffett Field’s Hangar One: Challenges and Opportunities
  2. 2. Moffett Field added to “Superfund” List in 1987 because of TCE Contamination
  3. 3. In 2003 Hangar One found to be source of PCBs in Moffett wetlands
  4. 4. Navy’s proposal to demolish hangar blocked by public outcry
  5. 5. So Navy removed siding/roof and coated the frame
  6. 6. Long-Term Management Plan requires inspections of coating on • Structural steel frame (excluding the top and bottom sides of the mezzanine deck). • Concrete Masonry Unit (CMU) walls surrounding the six electrical vaults. • CMU walls surrounding the former hazardous materials storage room. • CMU walls that were part of the former toilets. • Door operating mechanisms (trucks/bolsters, motor housing, electrical vaults, and drive gear housing).
  7. 7. and sampling of stormwater and sediment
  8. 8. EPA leading effort to replace pump-and- treat with new groundwater remedies
  9. 9. Reuse will require mitigation of vapor intrusion
  10. 10. Aerated floor can be installed with new concrete slab to prevent vapor intrusion
  11. 11. Existing tunnel and any new utility corridors must be sealed
  12. 12. and air monitoring will be necessary after re-covering
  13. 13. The Navy is responsible for inspection and maintenance of Hangar One’s epoxy coating as well as stormwater and sediment sampling. The Navy is also responsible for vapor mitigation in existing buildings. But it doesn’t want to be.
  14. 14. Any lessee who attaches a new roof/siding and/or modifies the hangar floor is likely to incur Superfund liability.
  15. 15. SOLUTION: Navy pays lessee to take responsibility for long-term management of residual contamination as well as vapor mitigation, based upon Navy’s projected costs. Navy can’t just walk away. Negotiations among lessee, NASA, Navy, and EPA are essential.

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