Job Design for Self-Motivation Lieutenant Scott Buziecki North Aurora (Illinois) Police Dept.
North Aurora Police Dept. <ul><li>Serving growing community of 16,000 residents </li></ul><ul><li>32 full time employees (...
Objectives <ul><li>Desire to push problem solving and decision making lower in the organization </li></ul><ul><li>Be more ...
Community Policing* <ul><li>Focuses on crime and social disorder through a balance of reactive responses to calls with pro...
Police Values-C.O.P. Research <ul><li>Midwestern police department—1968 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Rokeach, Miller, & Snyder, 1...
Police Values Profile* <ul><li>Consist of: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Low rankings of  social values </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul...
Review of Literature <ul><li>Value of  equality  is the best single indicator of conservatism. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Rokea...
Review of Literature <ul><li>Police need human relations training to alter their value priorities so that they could  work...
Review of Literature <ul><li>Officers with high ranking of  equality  (liberal values) are more likely to agree that polic...
Job Characteristics Theory <ul><li>Improving the core dimensions of a job allows the employee to experience desired psycho...
Research / Feasibility Study <ul><li>Determine if NAPD officers had conservative “police” values </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Com...
Data Collection <ul><li>Rokeach Value survey (March 2008) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>NAPD officers & sergeants </li></ul></ul><...
APD-NAPD value data Yellow fill =Social Values Green fill =Personal Values 9 9.00 13 12.00 Wisdom 7 8.00 2 5.00 True frien...
Interest in C.O.P. Yellow fill = most popular statements Likert scale 1 = Strong Disinterest  /  7 = Strong Interest 9.5% ...
Motivation of the Work Yellow fill = most popular statements Likert scale 1 = Strongly Disagree /  7 = Strongly Agree 21.1...
Motivation to Do C.O.P Work <ul><li>“It was a chance to work to solve problems, not just respond to something that had alr...
Job Diagnostic Survey
Discussion <ul><li>Next steps </li></ul><ul><li>Questions? </li></ul>
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Law Enforcement Job Design For Self Motivation

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A presentation of original research to the 2008 Midwest Academy of Management held in St. Louis, MO.

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  • Growth spurt from mid 90’s to mid 2000’s. During that time, focus on hiring &amp; training new officers as well as professionalization
  • Caldero &amp; Larose, 2001— “a low ranking of ‘equality’ indicates political conseratism, and a values system unfavorable toward the political endeavors of minorities and the poor, especially in terms of their attempts to improve their civil and economic status”
  • Caldero &amp; Larose, 2001— “a low ranking of ‘equality’ indicates political conseratism, and a values system unfavorable toward the political endeavors of minorities and the poor, especially in terms of their attempts to improve their civil and economic status”
  • Don’t confuse social vs. personal as social vs. anti-social
  • Law Enforcement Job Design For Self Motivation

    1. 1. Job Design for Self-Motivation Lieutenant Scott Buziecki North Aurora (Illinois) Police Dept.
    2. 2. North Aurora Police Dept. <ul><li>Serving growing community of 16,000 residents </li></ul><ul><li>32 full time employees (30 sworn officers) </li></ul><ul><li>Rapid growth from mid-90’s to mid 2000’s </li></ul><ul><li>Growing group of Gen X and Gen Y employees </li></ul>
    3. 3. Objectives <ul><li>Desire to push problem solving and decision making lower in the organization </li></ul><ul><li>Be more responsive to community concerns </li></ul><ul><li>Reasons </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Performance budgeting </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>More engaged employees </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Unifying strategy </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Better service to community </li></ul></ul>
    4. 4. Community Policing* <ul><li>Focuses on crime and social disorder through a balance of reactive responses to calls with proactive problem-solving centered on the causes of crime and disorder. </li></ul><ul><li>Police and citizens join together to identify and address issues. </li></ul>*U.S. Dept. of Justice definition
    5. 5. Police Values-C.O.P. Research <ul><li>Midwestern police department—1968 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Rokeach, Miller, & Snyder, 1971 </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Tacoma police department—1991 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Caldero & Larose, 2001 </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Spokane police department—1993 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Zhao, Lovrich, & He, 1998 </li></ul></ul>
    6. 6. Police Values Profile* <ul><li>Consist of: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Low rankings of social values </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Social (adj.): of or relating to human society, the interaction of the individual and the group, or the welfare of human beings as members of society (Merriam-Webster online) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Equality, social recognition </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>High rankings of personal values </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Family security, self-respect, happiness </li></ul></ul></ul>* Rokeach, et al., Caldero & Larose, Zhao, et al.
    7. 7. Review of Literature <ul><li>Value of equality is the best single indicator of conservatism. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Rokeach, et al., 1971 </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Values of equality and freedom are predictive of liberalism, moderatism, and conservatism. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Caldero & Larose, 2001 </li></ul></ul>Freedom High Low Nazis & KKK Communists Conservative Republicans Socialists & Liberal Democrats Equality Moderates Low High
    8. 8. Review of Literature <ul><li>Police need human relations training to alter their value priorities so that they could work better with the public. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Rokeach, Miller, Snyder, 1971 </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Conservative values are incompatible with Community Policing. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Caldero & Larose, 2001 </li></ul></ul>
    9. 9. Review of Literature <ul><li>Officers with high ranking of equality (liberal values) are more likely to agree that police should work with the community than officers with low ranking of equality (conservative values). </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Zhao, He, & Lovrich, 1999 </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Officers with conservative values would not support community policing. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Zhao, He, & Lovrich, 1999 </li></ul></ul>
    10. 10. Job Characteristics Theory <ul><li>Improving the core dimensions of a job allows the employee to experience desired psychological states and leads to better outcomes such as increased motivation, satisfaction, performance, reduced absenteeism, and reduced turnover (Hackman & Oldham) </li></ul><ul><li>Resulted in the Job Diagnostic Survey </li></ul>
    11. 11. Research / Feasibility Study <ul><li>Determine if NAPD officers had conservative “police” values </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Compare to officers in the Community Policing Unit of the Aurora Police Dept. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Determine if officers would be interested in community policing and if they would find the work motivating </li></ul><ul><li>Determine if core job dimensions can be improved </li></ul>
    12. 12. Data Collection <ul><li>Rokeach Value survey (March 2008) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>NAPD officers & sergeants </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>21 returned out of 28 in the population (75%) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>APD current and former Community Policing Officers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>14 returned out of 25 surveys (56%) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Job diagnostic survey (May 2008) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>NAPD officers, sergeants, & clerks </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>16 returned out of 30 in the population (53%) </li></ul></ul></ul>
    13. 13. APD-NAPD value data Yellow fill =Social Values Green fill =Personal Values 9 9.00 13 12.00 Wisdom 7 8.00 2 5.00 True friendship 17 14.00 12 11.00 Social recognition 4 6.00 4 7.00 Self-respect 16 14.00 17 16.00 Salvation 13 12.00 8 9.00 Pleasure 15 14.00 11 11.00 National security 10 10.00 14 12.00 Mature love 6 8.00 10 11.00 Inner harmony 2 6.00 3 5.00 Happiness 3 6.00 6 7.00 Freedom 1 1.00 1 3.00 Family security 11 11.00 16 15.00 Equality 14 13.00 9 10.00 An exciting life 18 16.00 18 17.00 A world of beauty 12 12.00 15 13.00 A world at peace 8 9.00 5 7.00 A sense of accomplishment 5 7.00 7 7.00 A comfortable life Rank Median Rank Median NAPD APD Terminal Values
    14. 14. Interest in C.O.P. Yellow fill = most popular statements Likert scale 1 = Strong Disinterest / 7 = Strong Interest 9.5% 66.7% 5.2 7.1% 64.3% 5.4 Initiate community building & community-based problem solving 4.8% 95.2% 5.9 0.0% 85.7% 5.9 Propose innovative solutions to problems 9.5% 90.5% 5.6 0.0% 85.7% 5.9 Examine causes of crime & develop responses 23.8% 71.4% 5.0 35.7% 50.0% 4.4 Perform crime prevention through environmental design (CPTED) 0.0% 95.2% 6.1 7.1% 92.9% 6.0 Try to solve crime-related problems 38.1% 52.4% 4.3 21.4% 64.3% 5.1 Participate in community meetings about crime-related issues 9.5% 71.4% 5.6 14.3% 78.6% 5.6 Hear crime-related concerns from community Not Interested Interested Mean Score Not Interested Interested Mean Score NAPD APD COP tasks/behaviors
    15. 15. Motivation of the Work Yellow fill = most popular statements Likert scale 1 = Strongly Disagree / 7 = Strongly Agree 21.1% 68.4% 5.2 0.0% 100.0% 6.5 C.O.P. officers are encouraged to solve problems 10.5% 68.4% 5.2 0.0% 100.0% 6.1 C.O.P. officers plan their own work 26.3% 52.6% 4.5 0.0% 92.9% 6.1 C.O.P. officers have greater say in setting goals 31.6% 47.4% 4.5 7.1% 92.9% 6.1 C.O.P. officers have more problem solving and decision making responsibility 15.8% 78.9% 5.6 0.0% 100.0% 6.7 C.O.P. officers make important decisions about solving problems Disagree Agree Mean Disagree Agree Mean NAPD APD
    16. 16. Motivation to Do C.O.P Work <ul><li>“It was a chance to work to solve problems, not just respond to something that had already happened.” </li></ul><ul><li>“In C.O.P., one can work directly with the community and make a difference. While in patrol, I did not have the time to address issues and follow up on them.” </li></ul><ul><li>“Ability to be more proactive than reactive.” </li></ul>
    17. 17. Job Diagnostic Survey
    18. 18. Discussion <ul><li>Next steps </li></ul><ul><li>Questions? </li></ul>

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