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2 ‫زکات‬‫العلم‬‫نشرها‬
1 http://baftanymamanazam.blogfa.com/
Plagiarism: How to reference and
conduct research ethics
1
2‫...
Sources for most of the material in this
presentation1
http://www.plagiarism.org
http://isites.harvard.edu
1These sources ...
Outline
• Plagiarism: Definition and instances
• Harvard Guide to Using Sources
• Citations: Use and Importance
• Academic...
Plagiarism is an act of fraud
It involves both stealing someone else's work and lying about it afterward
In the dictionary...
Harvard Guide to Using Sources
A Publication of the Harvard College Writing Program
A HARWARD DEFINITION
In academic writi...
Citing sources
How to use a source effectively
you must integrate a source into your
argument in a way that makes it
clear...
Academic writing
• Academic writing is essentially an ongoing
conversation among scholars
• You are expected to do your ow...
What about images, videos, voice,
and music?
• Recording audio or video in which copyrighted
music or video is playing in ...
Types of Plagiarism
#1. Clone: Submitting another’s
work, word-for-word, as one’s
own
#2. CTRL-C: Contains significant
por...
Self-plagiarism
• Copying material you have previously
produced and passing it off as a new
production.
• This can potenti...
Glossary
• Attribution
The acknowledgement that something
came from another source
• Bibliography
A list of sources used i...
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Our Advertisement
Source: http://www.iran-moshaver.ir
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  1. 1. 2 ‫زکات‬‫العلم‬‫نشرها‬ 1 http://baftanymamanazam.blogfa.com/ Plagiarism: How to reference and conduct research ethics 1 2‫صادق‬ ‫امام‬ ‫به‬ ‫منسوب‬‫علیه‬‫السالم‬ Computer Science & Engineering Dept., Shahid Beheshti University Presented by: Ghassem Jaberipur Title proposed by Dr. Ghassemian
  2. 2. Sources for most of the material in this presentation1 http://www.plagiarism.org http://isites.harvard.edu 1These sources were kindly recommended by Professor Behrooz Parhami of UCSB
  3. 3. Outline • Plagiarism: Definition and instances • Harvard Guide to Using Sources • Citations: Use and Importance • Academic writing • Audio and Video • Types of Plagiarism • Self Plagiarism • Glossary
  4. 4. Plagiarism is an act of fraud It involves both stealing someone else's work and lying about it afterward In the dictionary1 • to steal and pass off, the ideas or words of another, as one's own • to use, another's production, without crediting the source • to present as new and original an idea or product derived from an existing source Instances of plagiarism • turning in someone else's work as your own • copying words or ideas from someone else without giving credit • failing to put a quotation in quotation marks • giving incorrect information about the source of a quotation • changing words but copying the sentence structure of a source without giving credit 1Merriam-Webster
  5. 5. Harvard Guide to Using Sources A Publication of the Harvard College Writing Program A HARWARD DEFINITION In academic writing, it is considered plagiarism to draw any idea or any language from someone else without adequately crediting that source in your paper. Taking credit for anyone else's work is stealing, and it is unacceptable in all academic situations, whether you do it intentionally or by accident.
  6. 6. Citing sources How to use a source effectively you must integrate a source into your argument in a way that makes it clear to your reader that what the source is doing in your paper not only which ideas come from that source, but also what the source is adding to your own thinking In other words, each source you use in a paper should be there for a reason and your reader should not have to guess what that reason is IMPORTANCE OF CITATIONS • First, citing sources allows scholars to give credit to other scholars for their hard work and their ideas. • Second, by citing sources, scholars provide a roadmap for readers who are interested in learning more about a topic and joining the ongoing conversation about that topic.
  7. 7. Academic writing • Academic writing is essentially an ongoing conversation among scholars • You are expected to do your own thinking, when assigned research and writing so that: • you can figure out what you think rather than reporting or parroting someone else's thoughts
  8. 8. What about images, videos, voice, and music? • Recording audio or video in which copyrighted music or video is playing in the background • Re-creating a visual work in the same medium. Example: shooting a photograph that uses the same composition and subject matter as someone else’s photograph • Re-creating a visual work in a different medium Example: making a painting that closely resembles another person’s photograph
  9. 9. Types of Plagiarism #1. Clone: Submitting another’s work, word-for-word, as one’s own #2. CTRL-C: Contains significant portions of text from a single source without alterations #3. Find-Replace: Changing key words and phrases but retaining the essential content of the source #4. Remix: Paraphrases from multiple sources, made to fit together #5. Recycle: Borrows generously from the writer’s previous work without citation #6. Hybrid: Combines perfectly cited sources with copied passages without citation #7. Mashup: Mixes copied material from multiple sources #8. 404 Error: Includes citations to non-existent or inaccurate information about sources #9. Aggregator: Includes proper citation to sources but the paper contains almost no original work #10. Re-tweet: Includes proper citation, but relies too closely on the text’s original wording and/or structure
  10. 10. Self-plagiarism • Copying material you have previously produced and passing it off as a new production. • This can potentially violate copyright protection if the work has been published and is banned by most academic policies.
  11. 11. Glossary • Attribution The acknowledgement that something came from another source • Bibliography A list of sources used in preparing a work • Citation A short, formal indication of the source of information or quoted material • Common Knowledge Information that is readily available from a number of sources or so well- known that its sources do not have to be cited Example: Carrots are a source of Vitamin A (common knowledge, no source accreditation). However, Effects of Vitamin A on the human body products of original research; to be cited • Original Not derived from anything else, new and unique • Paraphrase A restatement of a text or passage in other words • Reproduction Redrawing a figure with new symbols • Public Domain The absence of copyright protection; belonging to the public so that anyone may copy or borrow from it
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