Week 2 Teaching listening comprehension

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Through reception, we internal linguistic information needed to produce language. Listening competence is usually larger that speaking competence. Earlier focus on speaking skills...

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Week 2 Teaching listening comprehension

  1. 1. WEEK 2 5:00 – 6:30 CHAPTER OVERVIEW AND DISCUSSION. 6:30 – 6:45 BREAK 6:45 – 7:20 GROUP WORK AND DISCUSSION 7:20 – 7:45 LESSON PLANS 11-6001 Teo. and Prac. of English Teaching Instructor: Stephanie Brooks, M.Sc. M.Sc. Stephanie Brooks
  2. 2. WEEK 2 TEACHING LISTENING COMPREHENSION 11-6001 Teo. and Prac. of English Teaching Instructor: Stephanie Brooks, M.Sc. M.Sc. Stephanie Brooks
  3. 3. TEACHING LISTENING COMPREHENSION  Through reception, we internal linguistic information needed to produce language.  Listening competence is usually larger that speaking competence.  Earlier focus on speaking skills. M.Sc. Stephanie Brooks
  4. 4. PEDAGOGICAL RESEARCH  James Asher's 1970s TPR (Total Physical Response).  Natural Approach (The Silent Period).  Stephen Krashen (significance of comprehensible input i+1).  Conversion of input into intake - crucial to Listening in language learning. M.Sc. Stephanie Brooks
  5. 5.  What are listeners “doing” while they are listen?  What factors affect good listening?  What are the characteristics of real-life listening?  What are the main things listeners listen for?  What are some principles of designing listening techniques ?  What are some common techniques for Teaching listening ? Questions To Consider About LISTENING COMPREHENSION M.Sc. Stephanie Brooks
  6. 6. The hearer  processes raw speech - an image in his short term memory.  determines the type of speech event to color the interpretation of the message heard.  infers the objectives of the speaker through considerations of the type of speech event, context, and content.  recalls background information (schemata)relevant to the particular context and subject matter. Cognitive association through reception, internalization of linguistic information needed to produce language. Eight Processes Involved in Hearing M.Sc. Stephanie Brooks
  7. 7. The hearer  assigns a literal meaning to the utterance. It involves the semantic interpretation of the surface structured and an intended meaning; they are sometimes the same.  needs to know how to get to the deep, intended meaning.  decides if info. should be stored in short or longterm memory.  deletes the original message and instead retain it conceptually. Eight Processes Involved in Hearing M.Sc. Stephanie Brooks
  8. 8. Monologue  Planned Monologue: speeches and other pre- written material.  Little redundancy.  Relatively difficult to understand.  Unplanned Monologue: impromptu lectures and short stories in conversations)  More redundancy.  Easier comprehension.  Presence of more performance variables and other habitations. Types of Oral Language M.Sc. Stephanie Brooks
  9. 9. Dialogue It involves two or more speakers  Interpersonal Dialogues: social relationships.  Transactional Dialogues: propositions or factual information.  The familiarity of the speakers will produce conversation with more assumption, implications, and other meanings hidden between lines. Types of Spoken Language M.Sc. Stephanie Brooks
  10. 10.  Clustering: chunking of info form a message in meaningful blocks (clauses and phrases)  Students are to be taught how to pick out manageable clusters of words.  Redundancy: rephrasing, repetition, elaboration, and insertions (“I mean”, “You know”, “Well”).  It gives the learners extra processing time and information.  Show them how to benefit from redundancy. What Makes Listening Difficult? M.Sc. Stephanie Brooks
  11. 11.  Reduced Forms: they can be  phonological (e.g. wanna, gotta).  Morphological (contractions e.g. ‘d, ‘ll)  Syntactic (e.g. “tomorrow, maybe”, “She’s coming, I think”)  Pragmatic (“She entered the room, furious, threw her backpack, a yell is heard, “Mom, I’m home!”)  Reduced forms are mostly difficult to learners who have been exposed to full forms and structures of the English language. What Makes Listening Difficult? M.Sc. Stephanie Brooks
  12. 12.  Colloquial language: idioms, slang, reduced forms, shared cultural knowledge. They may be present in monologues and dialogues.  Rate of delivery: learners need to comprehend language delivered at various rates.  Stress, rhythm, and intonation: these prosodic features of the English language are important to comprehension.  Interaction: students need to have skills in negotiation, clarification, attending signals, turn taking, and topic nomination, maintenance, and termination when conversing with others. What Makes Listening Difficult? M.Sc. Stephanie Brooks
  13. 13. Let’s take a look at pp. 241-242! Microskills of Listening Comprehension M.Sc. Stephanie Brooks
  14. 14.  Reactive: listen and repeat surface structure.  Little meaningful purpose; it must be limited.  E.g. Brief choral or individual drills focused on pronunciation.  Intensive: focus on components (phones, words, intonation, figures markets, etc.)  Singling out of certain elements. E.g. Focus, question intonation.  Responsive: short teacher language that elicit mediate response.  Students process the teacher talk and structure an appropriate response.  E.g. Asking questions, giving commands, seeking clarification, checking comprehension. TYPES of Classroom Listening Performance M.Sc. Stephanie Brooks
  15. 15.  Selective: long discourses from Which the listeners scans the material selectively for certain information.  The objective is for them to find important info in a field of potentially distracting information.  E.g. Speeches, media broadcasts, stories and anecdotes , and conversations where learners are eavesdroppers.  Extensive: aim to develop a top-down, global understanding of spoken language.  This may go from listening to lengthy lectures to a conversation, deriving a comprehensive message or purpose.  It may be complemented with note-taking and discussion.  Interactive: it includes all previous types of participation (discussions, debates, conversations, role-plays, and other pair and group work). It is integrated with speaking. TYPES of Classroom Listening Performance M.Sc. Stephanie Brooks
  16. 16.  Do not overlook techniques for the development of listening comprehension competence.  Each skill deserves special focus in appropriate doses.  Do not assume that input will always become intake.  Techniques should be intrinsically motivating.  Take ss experience, abilities, and goals into account as you design the class.  Techniques should utilize authentic language and context.  Authentic and real-world tasks enable students to see the relevance of the classroom activity. PRINCIPALS FOR DESIGNING LISTENING TECHNIQUES M.Sc. Stephanie Brooks
  17. 17.  Carefully consider the form of listener's responses. Comprehension is not externally comprehensible, we can only infer Ss comprehension; therefore , design techniques so that Ss responses indicate whether or not they have comprehended. Ways to check ss listening comprehension: PRINCIPALS FOR DESIGNING LISTENING TECHNIQUES M.Sc. Stephanie Brooks
  18. 18.  Encourage the development of listening strategies.  Some 2L learners are not aware of how t listen.  They need to be equipped with listening strategies that go beyond the classroom: PRINCIPALS FOR DESIGNING LISTENING TECHNIQUES M.Sc. Stephanie Brooks
  19. 19.  Include both bottom-up and top-down listening techniques.  Bottom-up: processing goes from sounds to words, to grammatical relationships, to lexical meaning, to a final message.  Top-down: processing is evoked form a bank of prior knowledge and global expectations, and other background info that the listener brings to the text. PRINCIPALS FOR DESIGNING LISTENING TECHNIQUES M.Sc. Stephanie Brooks
  20. 20. WEEK 2 TEACHING LISTENING COMPREHENSION 11-6001 Teo. and Prac. of English Teaching Instructor: Stephanie Brooks, M.Sc. M.Sc. Stephanie Brooks
  21. 21. WEEK 2 THE LESSON PLAN 11-6001 Teo. and Prac. of English Teaching Instructor: Stephanie Brooks, M.Sc. M.Sc. Stephanie Brooks
  22. 22. School Name: Subject: Grade: Professor: Date: ____ to ____ M.Sc. Stephanie Brooks
  23. 23. WEEK 2 OBSERVATION RUBRIC: ORAL LANGUAGE CLASS 11-6001 Teo. and Prac. of English Teaching Instructor: Stephanie Brooks, M.Sc. M.Sc. Stephanie Brooks

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