Writing That Works | Chapter 1 Bedford/St. Martin's (c) 2013 1
Chapter One
Assessing Audience, Purpose,
and Medium: A Case...
Writing That Works | Chapter 1 Bedford/St. Martin's (c) 2013 2
Chapter One
Table of Contents
 Writer’s Checklist: Plannin...
Writer’s Checklist: Planning Your
Document
 Determine your purpose.
 Assess your audience’s needs.
 Consider the contex...
Writing That Works | Chapter 1 Bedford/St. Martin's (c) 2013 4
Considering Audience and Purpose:
Writing for Your Reader
...
Writing That Works | Chapter 1 Bedford/St. Martin's (c) 2013 5
Considering Audience and Purpose:
Writing for Your Reader (...
Writing That Works | Chapter 1 Bedford/St. Martin's (c) 2013 6
Considering Audience and Purpose:
Writing for Your Reader (...
Writing That Works | Chapter 1 Bedford/St. Martin's (c) 2013 7
Writer’s Checklist: Assessing Context
 What is your profes...
Writing That Works | Chapter 1 Bedford/St. Martin's (c) 2013 8
Writer’s Checklist: Assessing Context
(continued)
 What sp...
Writing That Works | Chapter 1 Bedford/St. Martin's (c) 2013 9
Writer’s Checklist: Drafting with Ethical
Considerations in...
Writer’s Checklist: Drafting with Ethical
Considerations in Mind (continued)
 Does the action or communication violate an...
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WTW Chapter 1

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WTW Chapter 1

  1. 1. Writing That Works | Chapter 1 Bedford/St. Martin's (c) 2013 1 Chapter One Assessing Audience, Purpose, and Medium: A Case Study
  2. 2. Writing That Works | Chapter 1 Bedford/St. Martin's (c) 2013 2 Chapter One Table of Contents  Writer’s Checklist: Planning Your Document  Considering Audience and Purpose: Writing for Your Reader  Writer’s Checklist: Assessing Context  Writer’s Checklist: Drafting with Ethical Considerations in Mind
  3. 3. Writer’s Checklist: Planning Your Document  Determine your purpose.  Assess your audience’s needs.  Consider the context of your writing.  Generate, gather, and record ideas and facts.  Establish the scope of coverage for your topic.  Organize your ideas.  Select the medium. Writing That Works | Chapter 1 Bedford/St. Martin's (c) 2013 3
  4. 4. Writing That Works | Chapter 1 Bedford/St. Martin's (c) 2013 4 Considering Audience and Purpose: Writing for Your Reader  Who is your audience?  What do you want your audience to know, to believe, or to be able to do after reading your writing?  Have you narrowed your topic to best focus on what you want your audience to know?  What are your audience’s needs in relation to the subject? Try to answer each of the following questions in as much detail as possible to help focus on your reader’s needs in relation to your subject. This process is helpful for all types of writing, but it will be especially important for longer, more complex tasks.
  5. 5. Writing That Works | Chapter 1 Bedford/St. Martin's (c) 2013 5 Considering Audience and Purpose: Writing for Your Reader (continued)  What does your audience know about the subject?  Do you have more than one audience?  If you have multiple audiences, do they have different levels of knowledge about your subject?  What are your audience’s feelings about your subject— sympathetic? hostile? neutral?  Does your writing acknowledge other or contrary points of view about the subject?  Is your tone respectful?
  6. 6. Writing That Works | Chapter 1 Bedford/St. Martin's (c) 2013 6 Considering Audience and Purpose: Writing for Your Reader (continued)  Have you selected the right medium – email, memo, letter, brochure, blog posting, and so on – for your subject and audience?  Does your format enhance audience understanding?
  7. 7. Writing That Works | Chapter 1 Bedford/St. Martin's (c) 2013 7 Writer’s Checklist: Assessing Context  What is your professional relationship with your readers and how might that affect the tone, style, and scope of your writing?  What is “the story” behind the immediate reason you are writing; that is, what series of events or previous communications led to your need to write? Use the following questions as a starting point as you assess the context for your topic:
  8. 8. Writing That Works | Chapter 1 Bedford/St. Martin's (c) 2013 8 Writer’s Checklist: Assessing Context (continued)  What specific factors or values, such as business competition, financing, and regulatory environment, are important to your readers’ organization or department?  What is the corporate culture in which your readers work?  What recent or current events within or outside an organization or a department may influence how readers interpret your writing?  What national cultural differences might affect your readers’ expectations for or interpretations of a document?  What medium do your readers prefer – email, memo, letter, report, or other?
  9. 9. Writing That Works | Chapter 1 Bedford/St. Martin's (c) 2013 9 Writer’s Checklist: Drafting with Ethical Considerations in Mind On the job, ethical dilemmas do not always present themselves as clear-cut choices. To help avoid ethical problems in your writing, ask the following questions as you plan and review your draft:  Is the communication honest and truthful?  Am I ethically consistent in my communications?  Am I acting in the best interest of my employer? the public? myself?  What would happen if everybody acted or communicated in this way?
  10. 10. Writer’s Checklist: Drafting with Ethical Considerations in Mind (continued)  Does the action or communication violate anyone’s rights?  Am I willing to take responsibility for the communication, publicly and privately? Writing That Works | Chapter 1 Bedford/St. Martin's (c) 2013 10

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