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Wanderwell engr 245 lean launch pad stanford 2019

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Wanderwell engr 245 lean launch pad stanford 2019

  1. 126 total interviews Niche market type 1 Helping businesses turn queues into an asset Trusted travel planning through your network LineZoom Wanderwell Alex Weitzman Designer MS Computer Science & BS Symbolic Systems Daniel Levine Picker MBA & BS Computer Science Alexander Sappington Hustler MBA & BS Economics Aditya Khandelwal Hacker BS Computer Science Don Peppers Advisor
  2. 2 It started with travel broadly... Week: 0
  3. 3 And narrowed to airport lines... Week: 0 Airport lines are a pain ... Actually, all lines are a pain Actually, all lines are a pain Actually, all lines are a pain
  4. 4 In the beginning, we were LineZoom... Week: 1 A queue management platform that allows consumers to “virtually” stand in lines across all businesses Plus, a “fastpass” system allowing customers to pay more to wait in a shorter line
  5. In the beginning, we were LineZoom... 5Week: 1 Value Prop: Improve customer service & maximize revenue Customer Segment: Busy enterprises who have a wait time for their service.
  6. In the beginning, we were LineZoom... 6Week: 1 We reached out to 15 businesses: 1. 7 retail shops 2. 5 restaurants 3. 2 theme parks/arenas 4. 1 sports team (49ers)
  7. In the beginning, we were LineZoom... 7Week: 1 Value Prop: Convenience and saving time Customer Segment: People who want to wait in line virtually and/or pay for expedited lines
  8. The Switch Test 8Week: 2 $$$?
  9. In the beginning, we were LineZoom... 9Week: 2
  10. In the beginning, we were LineZoom... 10 Big Insight: No one really cared about lines “I never stand in lines” Week: 2
  11. In the beginning, we were LineZoom... 11 Big Insight: No one really cared, or at least didn’t realize frequency of the pain “I never stand in lines” Week: 2
  12. A bold but necessary decision: Restart 12Week: 2
  13. We dove into the travel planning space What we heard: Lack of trust in available online options Week: 3 Wanderwell Hyper-local
  14. Millennials prefer their friends’ recommendations 22 MBA1s, 24 undergrads Week: 3 If you only had time for one, which would you choose?
  15. Find inspiration 1 2 3 4 5 Got a good sense of the millennial’s travel planning process Week: 3
  16. Find inspiration Get recs from friends 1 2 3 4 5 Got a good sense of the millennial’s travel planning process Week: 3
  17. Find inspiration Get recs from friends Verify with review sites Build itinerary Book 1 2 3 4 5 Got a good sense of the millennial’s travel planning process Week: 3
  18. Find inspiration Get recs from friends Verify with review sites Build itinerary Book 1 2 3 4 5 Got a good sense of the millennial’s travel planning process Week: 3 Often manually done, unorganized, or skipped by travelers
  19. Finding recommendations is currently a manual, messy process Week: 3 Survey sent to 17 students 67.5% said asking for recommendations takes too much effort and time.
  20. Find inspiration Get recs from friends Verify with review sites Build itinerary Book 1 2 3 4 5 MVP #1: Aggregator site for GSB students’ travel recommendations Week: 3
  21. MVP #1: Aggregator site for GSB students’ travel recommendations Week: 4
  22. Week: 4 Drawbacks of MVP1: No incentive Emailed the MVP to 50 GSB students at random. 12/50 (24%) of recipients signed in, but 0 submitted recommendations
  23. Week: 4 How can we give an incentive? We looked to our survey data...
  24. Week: 4 How can we give an incentive? We looked to our survey data...
  25. MVP #2: A shareable itinerary Week: 5
  26. MVP #2: A shareable itinerary Week: 5 Stanford University: 10 people Columbia University: 10 people
  27. MVP #2: A powerful shot, but off target Week: 5
  28. MVP #2: A powerful shot, but off target Week: 5
  29. MVP #2: A powerful shot, but off target Week: 5
  30. MVP #2: A powerful shot, but off target Week: 5
  31. Wanderwell hits a new low Week: 6
  32. Wanderwell hits a new low No one wants this. Time to pivot. Week: 6
  33. Wanderwell hits a new low No one wants this. Time to pivot. Wellness travel? Week: 6
  34. Wanderwell hits a new low No one wants this. Time to pivot. Wellness travel? We are NOT doing another re-start!! Week: 6
  35. Wanderwell hits a new low No one wants this. Time to pivot. Wellness travel? We are NOT doing another re-start!! At least we’re not still doing lines... Week: 6
  36. Wanderwell hits a new low Why did I have to get stuck with these guys... Week: 6
  37. Then, two critical user interviews Week: 6
  38. Then, two critical user interviews Week: 6 “Look, your tool is cool, but I’m not going to send it out because I have no clue who to send it to.” GSB Student
  39. Then, two critical user interviews Week: 6 “Look, your tool is cool, but I’m not going to send it out because I have no clue who to send it to.” “Our list-serv is full of unorganized travel rec spam and we’ve been trying to fix it.” GSB Student Harvard alumna
  40. Then, two critical user interviews Week: 6 “Build us a solution and we’ll use it.” Harvard alumna
  41. Find friends who have been there 1 2a 3 4 5 Now knew we had to facilitate expertise discovery within networks Week: 7 2b 2 Find inspiration Verify with review sites Build itinerary Book Ask for recs from those people
  42. ● Travel bloggers & influencers ● Alumni travel office ● Travel agents / planners (to help with booking before we have capability) ● Airlines, hotels ● Online booking sites ● Experience operators who will pay an affiliate fee ● Investors Networks with active list- servs that include frequent travel recommendation requesting E.g., All-female college club or sorority alumni networks Females looking for safe, trusted recs abroad People who care about social trends Find where your friends have been Reduce friction in rec request, itinerary building, and booking processes by reducing frictions Make travel planning a more social experience Commissions for bookings, Pay for organized itineraries / guide while on the ground, Advertising ● Product development ● Customer acquisition: Source networks for initial launch, create virality ● Partner development Wanderwell Week [8] 43 Personal, exciting, intuitive, trustworthy, communal, visual, interactive, minimal, modern Web & Mobile app Network identification efforts Network launch parties Word of mouth ● Physical: office locations ● Software: Mobile app, REST API, booking platform, modern tech ● Human: software engineers, growth hackers / sales people, advisors & mentors ● IP: Travel-tech expertise Tech platform development and maintenance costs; Customer acquisition costs; Business development costs with partners; Employee payroll Value Propositions: Find out where your network has been and get recommendations Customer Segments: Members of active, trusted social networks
  43. Finally, some positive signs 44Week: 8Week: 8
  44. Finally, some positive signs Responses: 10 emails within 5 minutes 35 emails in first afternoon 71 emails received (25% of the network) 45Week: 8Week: 8
  45. Finally, some positive signs 46 “Great idea!” “So GSB of you ;) This looks cool!” “I LOVEEEEEE this idea yay” Week: 8Week: 8
  46. Potential partnerships emerge 47Week: 8 Partner: Hypothesis: Alumni group travel offices Reason: Additional users and also a supplemental revenue source for Wanderwell
  47. Potential partnerships emerge 48 “We know [the alumni] are talking - where they’ve been, where to go next - but we don’t have a way of tapping into that conversation to improve our offering.” “Your idea could be huge for our marketing department.” Week: 8
  48. MVP #3: Bringing it all together check it out: trywanderwell.com Week: 9
  49. MVP #3: Testing with the GSB network Week: 9
  50. MVP #3: Bringing it all together Week: 10 40new users 18asks for recommendations 31recommendations Additionally, we had 61 requests to connect
  51. MVP #4: Building on our learnings Week: 10 Next additions: ● Notifications when you receive a recommendation ● Likes, upvotes, and replies ● “News Feed” style updates
  52. Summary: What we are Week: 10 By showing you where your network has been, we help travelers easily obtain recommendations they trust. Once we have that core data, we can leverage it to build a full social travel solution.
  53. Find friends who have been there Find inspiration Ask for recs from those people Verify with review sites Build an itinerary Book where necessary 1 3 4 5 Current Wanderwell To compete in crowded space, must focus on trust-based, social aspect … 2a 2b
  54. Current Wanderwell Future Wanderwell … but eventually span the entire planning journey to make money Find friends who have been there Find inspiration Ask for recs from those people Verify with review sites Build an itinerary Book where necessary 1 3 4 52a 2b
  55. ● Travel bloggers & influencers ● Alumni travel office ● Travel agents / planners (to help with booking before we have capability) ● Online booking sites ● Hotels, restaurants ● Experience operators who will pay an affiliate fee ● Investors Networks with active list- servs that include frequent travel recommendation requesting E.g., All-female college club or sorority alumni networks Females looking for safe, trusted recs abroad People who care about social trends Find where your friends have been Reduce friction in rec request, itinerary building, and booking processes by reducing frictions Make travel planning a more social experience Commissions for bookings, Pay for organized itineraries / guide while on the ground, Advertising ● Product development ● Customer acquisition: Source networks for initial launch, create virality ● Partner development Wanderwell Week [8] 56 Personal, exciting, intuitive, trustworthy, communal, visual, interactive, minimal, modern Web & Mobile app Network identification efforts Network launch parties Word of mouth ● Physical: office locations ● Software: Mobile app, REST API, booking platform, modern tech ● Human: software engineers, growth hackers / sales people, advisors & mentors ● IP: Travel-tech expertise Tech platform development and maintenance costs; Customer acquisition costs; Business development costs with partners; Employee payroll Core Revenue Model: First Step: Affiliate fees from existing booking platform partners - Booking.com, Expedia, OpenTable End State: Booking done in-house - collect full commission from hotels, restaurants, & tour providers
  56. Revenue potential for Wanderwell 2025 Projections Users: 2.8M Revenue: $27M Earnings: $3M
  57. The future of Wanderwell - Plan to continue on in the spring quarter - Iterate on product and continue to gain traction within existing networks - Pitch investors for funding - Expand product development team - Accelerate acquisition of networks & partners
  58. Acknowledgements Thank you to all the professors, TAs, and other students in the class
  59. Acknowledgements And a special thank you to Donny Pep, our loving mentor
  60. Thank you!
  61. Appendix
  62. 3-year Operating Plan Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 2019 2020 2021 2021 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Cashreserves 5M 10M 20M 30M Seed $1M Series A $6M Series B $15M OperationsSoftware development Lean Launch pad Hire 2 engineers Integrate trip planning / booking features Integration with Google, TripAdvisor, and planning sites Suggested trips, curated itineraries according to your preferences MVP tests Beta Launch at colleges with campus reps Replicate & Scale Scaling destinations covered & customer acquisitionAnalyze Results Recs from friends platform Out of network recs Partnerships with hotels, airlines, tour operators 64 18 Months Time to Profitability: Travel map and friends’ maps
  63. Market Size Total Addressable Market: $38B Total annual travel spend ($381B) * potential booking commission (10%) Served Available Market: $19B TAM * Proportion of spend on things other than transportation (50%) Target Market: $2.7B SAM * Proportion of travel spend from millennials (35%) * Proportion who would never use a travel agent (40%) Y1-Y3 Revenue: $100K, $1M, $5M Estimating average fee of $200/itinerary booked (10% of average non-flight expenses) * itineraries booked (1,000; 10,000; 50,000) Sources: US Travel, Deloitte, World Atlas, Statistica 65
  64. Competitor Leaf Diagram Wanderwell Hyper-local Travel Startups 66
  65. - Building a startup is HARD - It requires grit to keep moving forward even when things seem hopeless Learnings (Wanderings)
  66. - Building a startup is HARD - It requires grit to keep moving forward even when things seem hopeless - The founding team is critical - We spent more time with each other than anyone else - Chemistry kept us going through tough times Learnings (Wanderings)
  67. Learnings (Wanderings) - Keep things simple - Be able to explain your value proposition to customers in 5 words - Only once we simplified to the core did we start seeing enthusiasm
  68. Learnings (Wanderings) - Keep things simple - Be able to explain your value proposition to customers in 5 words - Only once we simplified to the core did we start seeing enthusiasm - Break assumptions into testable hypotheses - We were slow to do this, but critical for de-risking

Editor's Notes

  • Wanderwell: Discover where your friends have traveled, then turn their recommendations into bookable guides
    With Wanderwell, we wanted to greatly simplify & improve the way people plan travel, turning the process from a chore into an engaging, social event.
    We had a great team working on this problem - Alex, Daniel, and Alexander who spent way more time with us than with his fiance. Don was also a huge help throughout the process.
    We’re excited about where we’ve ended up, but it was certainly a journey - here’s the story.
  • Wanderwell: Discover where your friends have traveled, then turn their recommendations into bookable guides
    With Wanderwell, we wanted to greatly simplify & improve the way people plan travel, turning the process from a chore into an engaging, social event.
    We had a great team working on this problem - Alex, Daniel, and Alexander who spent way more time with us than with his fiance. Don was also a huge help throughout the process.
    We’re excited about where we’ve ended up, but it was certainly a journey - here’s the story.
  • It feels crazy that just 8 short weeks ago, our company was called LineZoom and we were looking for a way to eliminate the pain point of standing in line.
    We were B2B and thought various businesses (retail, fast-casual restaurants, etc) would want a solution to lines for their customers.
  • Turns out they didn’t really want that - they thought it would be a logistical nightmare, and some even liked lines as a signaling device

    Then we said, OK, maybe we can work out a consumer platform.
  • It feels crazy that just 8 short weeks ago, our company was called LineZoom and we were looking for a way to eliminate the pain point of standing in line.
    We were B2B and thought various businesses (retail, fast-casual restaurants, etc) would want a solution to lines for their customers.
  • …. They even said that as they were standing in this line at Shake Shack.
  • That didn’t really work out either.
  • …. They even said that as they were standing in this line at Shake Shack.
  • After learning about the progress in scan-and-go and the lack of interest from users, we felt a restart was necessary. We zoomed out to our initial pain points on the travel journey, and heard that travel planning and trusted recommendations was a problem. It was devastating to see our work from the last few weeks wiped out, but we felt a renewed sense of energy.
  • Decided to explore other options in the travel space. We were aware that this space is very competitive, but what we heard over and over in our interviews is that millennial travelers don’t trust many of the travel planning options such as TripAdvisor and travel agents

    And that the key issue behind this was a lack of trust
  • We got a really compelling stat from a survey we we sent out that 90% of of travelers prefer friends’ recommendations over a TripAdvisor top 10

    We also sent out a survey to 22 MBA1s and 24 undergrads, and an overwhelming majority of them said they would prefer an activity recommended by a friend over an activity that is a TripAdvisor top 10. They attributed this trust to having similar tastes and interests to their friends
  • So, we came into the Lean Launchpad with an idea to simplify travel planning.
    To do that, we sat down with over 100 people to map out their ideal planning process – here’s a representation of what we found, especially for millennial travel enthusiasts.
    Clearly, there are tools along each step of this process – we’re aware travel is crowded!

    However, there were two things we noticed:
    No companies spanned the entire process – most new travel companies trying to enter around Step 4-5, we believe that is too late to capture traveler attention over the dominant players; the jump from 3->4 is very rare
    Very major players allow you to easily see where your network has been – social sites allow for mass calls for help, but that isn’t ideal

    We’ve currently developed a social platform to address Steps 2-3 in a new way; we’ll quickly also build out the link from 3->4-6, which will keep us top of mind throughout the planning journey.
  • So, we came into the Lean Launchpad with an idea to simplify travel planning.
    To do that, we sat down with over 100 people to map out their ideal planning process – here’s a representation of what we found, especially for millennial travel enthusiasts.
    Clearly, there are tools along each step of this process – we’re aware travel is crowded!

    However, there were two things we noticed:
    No companies spanned the entire process – most new travel companies trying to enter around Step 4-5, we believe that is too late to capture traveler attention over the dominant players; the jump from 3->4 is very rare
    Very major players allow you to easily see where your network has been – social sites allow for mass calls for help, but that isn’t ideal

    We’ve currently developed a social platform to address Steps 2-3 in a new way; we’ll quickly also build out the link from 3->4-6, which will keep us top of mind throughout the planning journey.
  • So, we came into the Lean Launchpad with an idea to simplify travel planning.
    To do that, we sat down with over 100 people to map out their ideal planning process – here’s a representation of what we found, especially for millennial travel enthusiasts.
    Clearly, there are tools along each step of this process – we’re aware travel is crowded!

    However, there were two things we noticed:
    No companies spanned the entire process – most new travel companies trying to enter around Step 4-5, we believe that is too late to capture traveler attention over the dominant players; the jump from 3->4 is very rare
    Very major players allow you to easily see where your network has been – social sites allow for mass calls for help, but that isn’t ideal

    We’ve currently developed a social platform to address Steps 2-3 in a new way; we’ll quickly also build out the link from 3->4-6, which will keep us top of mind throughout the planning journey.
  • So, we came into the Lean Launchpad with an idea to simplify travel planning.
    To do that, we sat down with over 100 people to map out their ideal planning process – here’s a representation of what we found, especially for millennial travel enthusiasts.
    Clearly, there are tools along each step of this process – we’re aware travel is crowded!

    However, there were two things we noticed:
    No companies spanned the entire process – most new travel companies trying to enter around Step 4-5, we believe that is too late to capture traveler attention over the dominant players; the jump from 3->4 is very rare
    Very major players allow you to easily see where your network has been – social sites allow for mass calls for help, but that isn’t ideal

    We’ve currently developed a social platform to address Steps 2-3 in a new way; we’ll quickly also build out the link from 3->4-6, which will keep us top of mind throughout the planning journey.
  • So, we came into the Lean Launchpad with an idea to simplify travel planning.
    To do that, we sat down with over 100 people to map out their ideal planning process – here’s a representation of what we found, especially for millennial travel enthusiasts.
    Clearly, there are tools along each step of this process – we’re aware travel is crowded!

    However, there were two things we noticed:
    No companies spanned the entire process – most new travel companies trying to enter around Step 4-5, we believe that is too late to capture traveler attention over the dominant players; the jump from 3->4 is very rare
    Very major players allow you to easily see where your network has been – social sites allow for mass calls for help, but that isn’t ideal

    We’ve currently developed a social platform to address Steps 2-3 in a new way; we’ll quickly also build out the link from 3->4-6, which will keep us top of mind throughout the planning journey.
  • So, we came into the Lean Launchpad with an idea to simplify travel planning.
    To do that, we sat down with over 100 people to map out their ideal planning process – here’s a representation of what we found, especially for millennial travel enthusiasts.
    Clearly, there are tools along each step of this process – we’re aware travel is crowded!

    However, there were two things we noticed:
    No companies spanned the entire process – most new travel companies trying to enter around Step 4-5, we believe that is too late to capture traveler attention over the dominant players; the jump from 3->4 is very rare
    Very major players allow you to easily see where your network has been – social sites allow for mass calls for help, but that isn’t ideal

    We’ve currently developed a social platform to address Steps 2-3 in a new way; we’ll quickly also build out the link from 3->4-6, which will keep us top of mind throughout the planning journey.
  • We compiled recommendations from across the GSB and shared it by email
  • -Randomly selected 50 GSB students to email site to and check activity
    -No one submitted recommendations
    -And from our interviews, we learned no one would stay engaged on the site. People seemed to only log in once and never return

    But we ran into some issues on the way. We couldn’t find ways to get incentive and needed some other model
  • In the same survey we have previously mentioned that we sent to around 40 students, we had also asked what motivates people to give recommendations to their friends
  • So what makes people make recommendations?
    Feedback we kept getting was they were being asked to give recs by their friends
    In these survey answers and in all our interviews, we kept hearing over and over that recommendations stemmed as a response to a direct request. It seemed to be the biggest incentive
  • New MVP is like a Google Doc you share with your friends. We wanted to tap into the process of 1-on-1 recommendation requests, so we just provided users with a link they can share with friends more knowledgable on the destination to help plan their trip by recommending points of interest at the destination

  • Showed it to 10 customers and had them play around with it
  • The responses we heard were it’s confusing, people didn’t know where to start, people didn’t see themselves using it, or they didn’t know who to send it to
  • At this point, after two MVPs without a semblance of product market fit, Wanderwell hit a new low.
  • The team disagreed on where to go next. Another pivot?
  • Maybe to wellness travel?
  • I was convinced we were getting close to something
  • Alex was just happy we weren’t still doing lines
  • Our mentor Don, though the smile never left his face, secretly wondered what he had done to get stuck with us
  • Just as all hope seemed lost, we had two critical interviews.
  • One GSB student saw our MVP and said look, I just don’t even know who I would send this to for recommendations, because I don’t know who’s been to Thailand.
  • Then we spoke to a Harvard alumna. She was part of a social club that maintains a 300-person alumni list-serv.
    She said that list-serv is primarily used for requesting and sharing travel recommendations, but this creates a lot of spam and the recs are very unorganized.
  • She said, “Build us a solution for this, and We’ll Use It” - finally, the kind of signal we’d been looking for.
  • We now saw we needed to add a sub-step in our traveler’s journey.
    The first step to getting trusted recommendations was actually discovering who to ask - finding out who has been to where you want to go.
  • We reworked our key value proposition to finding out where your network has been
    And our customer segment to members of these active, trusted social networks
  • We launched into a test of how interested that Harvard alumnae network truly was.
    Set up a simple landing page, and asked them to enter their email address if they’d want to sign up for our app.
  • The response was overwhelming, with 35 emails received in the first afternoon and 23% of the network saying yes, sign us up!
  • We also got some nice commentary - including I Loveeeee this idea!
  • Meanwhile, we gained some traction on the partner front. Given the connectedness we’d seen in alumni groups, we thought that alumni travel offices could be a good partner.
  • Sure enough, we spoke with the the head of the Stanford alumni travel group, and she was very excited about the idea, saying “we’d love a way to tap into the conversations we know alumni are having” and “your idea could be huge for our marketing department.”
  • But we still needed to know whether we had a business, which fell on 2 assumptions:
    1 - How easily could we get users now that we knew something they wanted?
    2 - Would those users produce any value?
    For this, we needed to bring the various products we’d built together into a final MVP.
  • We chose the GSB as our test network because it would have the highest concentration of near-term travelers.
    Plus, it enabled us to kick things off with a launch party!
  • People want travel recommendations from their friends - they trust and prefer those over anything generic online.

    We found it’s very hard to consistently get recs from friends in a way that’s easily consumable.

    By showing you where your network has been, we solve the main issue - how to get these recommendations.

    Once we have that core data, which no one else has, we can leverage it into building a full social travel solution.

  • So, we came into the Lean Launchpad with an idea to simplify travel planning.
    To do that, we sat down with over 100 people to map out their ideal planning process – here’s a representation of what we found, especially for millennial travel enthusiasts.
    Clearly, there are tools along each step of this process – we’re aware travel is crowded!

    However, there were two things we noticed:
    No companies spanned the entire process – most new travel companies trying to enter around Step 4-5, we believe that is too late to capture traveler attention over the dominant players; the jump from 3->4 is very rare
    Very major players allow you to easily see where your network has been – social sites allow for mass calls for help, but that isn’t ideal

    We’ve currently developed a social platform to address Steps 2-3 in a new way; we’ll quickly also build out the link from 3->4-6, which will keep us top of mind throughout the planning journey.
  • So, we came into the Lean Launchpad with an idea to simplify travel planning.
    To do that, we sat down with over 100 people to map out their ideal planning process – here’s a representation of what we found, especially for millennial travel enthusiasts.
    Clearly, there are tools along each step of this process – we’re aware travel is crowded!

    However, there were two things we noticed:
    No companies spanned the entire process – most new travel companies trying to enter around Step 4-5, we believe that is too late to capture traveler attention over the dominant players; the jump from 3->4 is very rare
    Very major players allow you to easily see where your network has been – social sites allow for mass calls for help, but that isn’t ideal

    We’ve currently developed a social platform to address Steps 2-3 in a new way; we’ll quickly also build out the link from 3->4-6, which will keep us top of mind throughout the planning journey.
  • Big insight we got from interviews is that recommendations are the right start but they actually would want more from us, a way to book
    We also sent out with our MVP (which we’ll talk about later) an offer to book someone’s trip for free, and we already got 2 requests
    So we decided to go in this direction and that’s the additions you see here, commission for bookings

    But we’re using the first step as the core value prop to attract customers / distinguish from competitors

    And they like to verify information before booking so also providing easy verification of info through TripAdvisor or Yelp

    *Update weekly
    Each customer segment needs a matching value prop. Use a different color for each customer segment.

    Order of Validation:
    1. Customer Segments
    2. Value Propositions
    3. Channels
    4. Customer Relationships
    5. Revenue Streams
    6. Key Activities
    7. Key Resources
    8. Key Partners
    9. Cost Structure
  • *Update weekly

    For [customer segment]
    who [key need or opportunity],
    [company name] is a [type of product or service]
    that [key value proposition that solves key need or opportunity].
    Unlike our competitors, we [differentiation].
  • *Update weekly

    For [customer segment]
    who [key need or opportunity],
    [company name] is a [type of product or service]
    that [key value proposition that solves key need or opportunity].
    Unlike our competitors, we [differentiation].
  • *Update weekly

    For [customer segment]
    who [key need or opportunity],
    [company name] is a [type of product or service]
    that [key value proposition that solves key need or opportunity].
    Unlike our competitors, we [differentiation].
  • *Update weekly

    For [customer segment]
    who [key need or opportunity],
    [company name] is a [type of product or service]
    that [key value proposition that solves key need or opportunity].
    Unlike our competitors, we [differentiation].
  • *Update weekly

    For [customer segment]
    who [key need or opportunity],
    [company name] is a [type of product or service]
    that [key value proposition that solves key need or opportunity].
    Unlike our competitors, we [differentiation].
  • 6-9 months after building the booking features we would become profitable
  • Identify ​market ​size ​(TAM/SAM/Target/Year ​1-3)
  • Add titles to each pedal leaf and then drop logos into the pedals themselves

    Use ​search ​tools ​(either ​those ​on ​from ​the Market ​Research ​section ​in ​Steve Blank’s ​Startup ​Tools ​or ​other ​publicly ​available ​sources)
  • *Update weekly

    For [customer segment]
    who [key need or opportunity],
    [company name] is a [type of product or service]
    that [key value proposition that solves key need or opportunity].
    Unlike our competitors, we [differentiation].
  • *Update weekly

    For [customer segment]
    who [key need or opportunity],
    [company name] is a [type of product or service]
    that [key value proposition that solves key need or opportunity].
    Unlike our competitors, we [differentiation].
  • *Update weekly

    For [customer segment]
    who [key need or opportunity],
    [company name] is a [type of product or service]
    that [key value proposition that solves key need or opportunity].
    Unlike our competitors, we [differentiation].
  • *Update weekly

    For [customer segment]
    who [key need or opportunity],
    [company name] is a [type of product or service]
    that [key value proposition that solves key need or opportunity].
    Unlike our competitors, we [differentiation].
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