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5. searching for evidence

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Searching for evidence

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5. searching for evidence

  1. 1. Searching for EVIDENCE Saurab Sharma, MPT Lecturer, KUSMS EBPP Lecturer 5
  2. 2. Objectives • At the end of the class, students should be able to: – Understand basic principles of effective searching – Search an article from Pubmed 2Saurab S, KUSMS 14'
  3. 3. Different search engines/ databases • Pubmed/medline • CINAHL • OVID • Cochrane • PEDro • Scopus • ScienceDirect • Proquest • Google Scholar 3Saurab S, KUSMS 14'
  4. 4. Basics of searching 1. Carefully define your clinical question 2. Choose your search terms 3. Broaden your search if necessary (with synonyms, truncation and/or wildcards 4. Use Boolean Operators 4Saurab S, KUSMS 14'
  5. 5. 1. Carefully define your clinical question • PICO 5Saurab S, KUSMS 14'
  6. 6. 2. Choose your search terms • PICO 6Saurab S, KUSMS 14'
  7. 7. 3. Broaden your search if necessary • If initial search yields no results • Use synonyms and or related terms – See list at eg: www.emedicinehealth.com • Truncation: use first part of the keyword and use symbol (* pubmed, : $ ovid) (eg: disease*) • Wild cards: use ? Within or at the end of keyword to substitute for ONLY one character. (eg: wom?n) 7Saurab S, KUSMS 14'
  8. 8. 4. Use Boolean Operators 1. AND 2. OR 3. NOT 8Saurab S, KUSMS 14'
  9. 9. 4. Use Boolean Operators 1. AND 2. OR 3. NOT 9Saurab S, KUSMS 14'
  10. 10. Elaborated steps 1. Identify components of question PICO 2. Compose your clinical question 3. Construct the final clinical question 4. Record keywords and phrases 5. Identify synonyms and variant words 6. Use truncation, wild cards and Boolean terms where appropriate 7. Decide the online resource(s) to search 10Saurab S, KUSMS 14'
  11. 11. Index term 1. MeSH terms (Pubmed) 2. Emtree (EMBASE) 3. CINAHL subject headings (CINAHL) • Organized hierarchically using tree structure • Broader terms higher in the tree • Used to broaden or narrow the search • Eg: stroke 11Saurab S, KUSMS 14'
  12. 12. References • Hoffmann T, Bennett S, Del Mar C. Evidence-based Practice across the health professionals. Churchill Livingstone. Elsevier Australia. 2010 12Saurab S, KUSMS 14'

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