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BY-
SAURABH
 A landslide, also known as a landslip, is
a geological phenomenon that includes a
wide range of ground movements, such
a...
 Landslides occur when the stability of the slope
changes from a stable to an unstable condition. A
change in the stabili...
 Landslides are aggravated by human activities, such
as:
1. deforestation, cultivation and construction, which
destabiliz...
Debris flow
Earthflows
Debris landslide
Sturzstrom
Shallow landslide
Deep-seated landslide
 Landslides in which the sliding surface is
mostly deeply located below the maximum
rooting depth of trees (typically to ...
A sturzstrom is a rare, poorly
understood type of landslide, typically
with a long run-out. Often very large,
these slide...
Can be of two types:
STRUCTURAL MITIGATION
NON STRUCTURAL
MITIGATION
 Drainage Corrections: The most important
triggering mechanism for mass movement is
water infiltrating into the land area...
Engineered structures with strong
foundations can withstand the ground
movement forces. Underground
installations(pipes, ...
 Hazard mapping locate areas prone to slope
failures. This well permit to identify avoidance
of areas for building settle...
 Landslide which moved Heart Mountain to its
current location, the largest ever discovered on
land. In the 48 million yea...
 The Goldau on September 2, 1806
 The Cap Diamant Québec rockslide on September
19, 1889
 Hope Slide landslide (46 mill...
Landslides
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Landslides

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Landslides

  1. 1. BY- SAURABH
  2. 2.  A landslide, also known as a landslip, is a geological phenomenon that includes a wide range of ground movements, such as rock falls , deep failure of slopes and shallow debris flows. Landslides can occur in offshore, coastal and onshore environments. Although the action of gravity is the primary driving force for a landslide to occur, there are other contributing factors affecting the original slope stability.
  3. 3.  Landslides occur when the stability of the slope changes from a stable to an unstable condition. A change in the stability of a slope can be caused by a number of factors, acting together or alone. Natural causes of landslides include: 1. groundwater (pore water) pressure acting to destabilize the slope 2. Loss or absence of vertical vegetative structure, soil nutrients, and soil structure (e.g. after a wildfire - a fire in forests lasting for 3–4 days) 3. erosion of the toe of a slope by rivers or ocean waves 4. weakening of a slope through saturation by snow melt, glaciers melting, or heavy rains
  4. 4.  Landslides are aggravated by human activities, such as: 1. deforestation, cultivation and construction, which destabilize the already fragile slopes. 2. vibrations from machinery or traffic 3. blasting 4. earthwork which alters the shape of a slope, or which imposes new loads on an existing slope 5. in shallow soils, the removal of deep-rooted vegetation that binds colluvium to bedrock
  5. 5. Debris flow Earthflows Debris landslide Sturzstrom Shallow landslide Deep-seated landslide
  6. 6.  Landslides in which the sliding surface is mostly deeply located below the maximum rooting depth of trees (typically to depths greater than ten meters). Deep-seated landslides usually involve deep regolith, weathered rock, and/or bedrock and include large slope failure associated with translational, rotational, or complex movement. This type of landslides are potentially occur in an tectonic active region like Zagros Mountain in Iran.
  7. 7. A sturzstrom is a rare, poorly understood type of landslide, typically with a long run-out. Often very large, these slides are unusually mobile, flowing very far over a low angle, flat, or even slightly uphill terrain.
  8. 8. Can be of two types: STRUCTURAL MITIGATION NON STRUCTURAL MITIGATION
  9. 9.  Drainage Corrections: The most important triggering mechanism for mass movement is water infiltrating into the land area during heavy rains. Hence the natural way of preventing this situation is by reducing water infiltration and allowing excess water to move down without hindrance. In such situation the first and foremost mitigation measure is drainage correction. This involves maintenance of natural drainage channels both micro and macro in vulnerable slopes.
  10. 10. Engineered structures with strong foundations can withstand the ground movement forces. Underground installations(pipes, cables, etc.) should be made flexible to move in order to withstand forces cause by the landslide. Retaining Walls can be built to stop land from slipping (these walls are seen along roads in hill stations).
  11. 11.  Hazard mapping locate areas prone to slope failures. This well permit to identify avoidance of areas for building settlements.  Awareness generation: The public should be educated about sings that a landslide is imminent sot that personal safety measures may be taken and also gathering information on indigenous methods used to reduce the impact. NON STRUCTURAL MITIGATION
  12. 12.  Landslide which moved Heart Mountain to its current location, the largest ever discovered on land. In the 48 million years since the slide occurred, erosion has removed most of the portion of the slide.  Flims Rockslide, ca. 12 km3 (2.9 cu mi), Switzerland, some 10000 years ago in post- glacial Pleistocene/Holocene, the largest so far described in the alps and on dry land that can be easily identified in a modestly eroded state.
  13. 13.  The Goldau on September 2, 1806  The Cap Diamant Québec rockslide on September 19, 1889  Hope Slide landslide (46 million cubic metres) near Hope, British Columbia on January 9, 1965.[16]  The 1966 Aberfan disaster  Tuve landslide in Gothenburg, Sweden on November 30, 1977.  The 1979 Abbotsford landslip, Dunedin, New Zealand on August 8, 1979.  Val Pola landslide during Valtellina disaster (1987) Italy  Thredbo landslide, Australia on 30 July 1997, destroyed hostel.

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