Symbiosis2

1,624 views

Published on

Published in: Technology, Self Improvement
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,624
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
4
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
11
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Notes: Relationships can be found throughout nature: Dependent and Independent Beneficial and Harmful Hosts and Parasites Questions: This rhino is in a variety of relationships some obvious and some less visible. 1) Can you name any of these partnerships? 2) What the purpose of the relationship? 3) Who does it harm or help?
  • Notes: Mammal - Bird relationships are common. Questions: Can you think of other animal-bird symbiotic relationships? Why and how do you think this relationship evolved? What special adaptations might have developed for this relationship?
  • Symbiosis2

    1. 1. Relationships in Nature BIO108
    2. 2. Symbiosis <ul><li>Living together </li></ul><ul><li>A partnership </li></ul><ul><li>Two different species </li></ul><ul><li>Both partners benefit – mutual benefit </li></ul>
    3. 3. Animal Kingdom <ul><li>Nile crocodile & crocodile bird </li></ul><ul><li>Hermit crab & sea anemone </li></ul><ul><li>Buffalo & oxpecker </li></ul><ul><li>Shark & remora fish </li></ul>
    4. 4. Crocodile & Bird <ul><li>Nile crocodile </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Usually eats animals </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Allows bird to walk around its mouth </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Crocodile bird </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Cleans parasites in croc’s teeth </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Removes and eats scraps of food </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Eats harmful leeches and parasites </li></ul></ul>
    5. 5. Hermit Crab & Sea Anemone <ul><li>Hermit crab </li></ul><ul><ul><li>protects the crab </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Sea anemone </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Gets leftover food </li></ul></ul>http://www.ms-starship.com/sciencenew/symbiosis.htm
    6. 6. Buffalo & Oxpecker <ul><li>Buffalo </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Lets the bird eat </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Oxpecker </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Eats ticks and other parasites off skin </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Warns buffalo of danger </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>http:// www.pbs.org/wnet/nature/enemies/partners.html </li></ul></ul>
    7. 8. Shark and Remora Fish <ul><li>Shark </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Lets the fish eat </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Remora Fish </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Eats parasites </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Gets the shark’s leftovers </li></ul></ul>
    8. 9. Lichen <ul><li>Slow growing plants </li></ul><ul><li>Partnership: fungi & algae </li></ul><ul><li>Neither could live alone </li></ul>
    9. 10. Relationships <ul><li>Phoresis </li></ul><ul><li>Commensalism </li></ul><ul><li>Mutualism </li></ul><ul><li>Parasitism </li></ul>
    10. 11. Phoresis <ul><li>Loose association </li></ul><ul><li>One organism is smaller than other </li></ul><ul><li>Larger organism used for transport </li></ul><ul><li>Dung beetles and cow dung </li></ul>
    11. 12. Commensalism <ul><li>“ eating together at the same table” </li></ul><ul><li>Only one member benefits </li></ul><ul><ul><li>sharing space, defense, shelter, food </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Neither will die if relationship is ended </li></ul><ul><li>Shrimp & sea cucumber </li></ul>http://www.ms-starship.com/sciencenew/symbiosis.htm
    12. 13. Mutualism <ul><li>Both organisms derive mutual benefit </li></ul><ul><li>Intimate and obligatory </li></ul><ul><li>Neither can survive without the other </li></ul><ul><li>Example – host and parasite </li></ul><ul><li>Tickbirds and rhinos </li></ul><ul><li>Clownfish & sea anemone </li></ul>
    13. 14. Parasitism <ul><li>Not symbiotic </li></ul><ul><li>Causes harm to host </li></ul>
    14. 15. This powerpoint was kindly donated to www.worldofteaching.com http://www.worldofteaching.com is home to over a thousand powerpoints submitted by teachers. This is a completely free site and requires no registration. Please visit and I hope it will help in your teaching.

    ×