The big 6

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The big 6

  1. 1. O B J E C T I V E : S T U D E N T S W I L L B E A B L E T O - I D E N T I F Y T H E B I G 6 I D E N T I F Y T H E S T R A T E G I E S T H A T G O O D R E A D E R S U S E A P P L Y T H E B I G 6 T O R E A D I N G “ H O W T O E A T L I K E A C H I L D ” The BIG 6
  2. 2. WHAT DO GOOD READERS DO? Objective: Students will be able to identify the strategies that good readers use - in your Reader’s Notebook
  3. 3.  What do good readers do? Objective: Students will be able to identify the strategies that good readers use With your neighbor brainstorm a list of things that good readers do when they read.
  4. 4. Good Readers…
  5. 5. Objective: students will be able to identify and define the Big 6
  6. 6. Created on wordle.net
  7. 7. Objective: Apply the Big 6 to reading “How to Eat Like a Child” PREDICT: Try to figure out what will happen next and how the selection might end. Before we begin reading, make a prediction about the title of this piece of writing: “How to Eat Like a Child” As we read we will discuss each of the Big 6 that you use, without even realizing that you are doing it!
  8. 8. Vocabulary  Depressions  Parlor  Maneuvers  Propped  Consumed  Casually
  9. 9. “How to Eat Like a Child” Peas: Mash and flatten into thin sheet on plate. Press the back of the fork into the peas. Hold fork vertically, prongs up and lick off the peas. Mashed Potatoes: Pat mashed potatoes on top. Dig several little depressions. Think of them as ponds or pools. Fill the pools with gravy. With your fork, sculpt rivers between pools and watch the gravy flow between them. Decorate with peas. Do not eat. Alternative method: Make a large hold in center of mashed potatoes. Pour in ketchup. Stir until potatoes turn pink. Eat as you would peas.
  10. 10. Animal crackers: Eat each in this order – legs, head, body.
  11. 11. Sandwich: Leave the crusts. If your mother says you have to eat them because that’s the best part, stuff the crusts into your pants pocket or between the cushions of the couch. Spaghetti: Wind too many strands on the fork and make sure at least two strands dangle down. Open your mouth wide and stuff in spaghetti; suck noisily to inhale the dangling strands. Clean plate, ask for seconds, and eat only half. When carrying your plate to the kitchen, hold it tilted so that the remaining spaghetti slides off and onto the floor.
  12. 12. Ice-cream cone: Ask for a double scoop. Knock the scoop off while walking out the door of the ice-cream parlor. Cry. Lick the remaining scoop slowly so that the ice cream melts down the outside of the cone and over your hand. Stop licking when the ice cream is even with the top of the cone. Be sure it is absolutely even. Eat a hole in the bottom of the cone and suck the rest of the ice cream out the bottom. When only the cone remains with ice cream coating the inside, leave on car dashboard.
  13. 13. Cooked carrots: On way to mouth, drop in lap. Smuggle to garbage in napkin. Spinach: Divide into little piles. Rearrange into new piles. After five or six maneuvers, sit back and say you are full. Chocolate chip cookies: Half-sit, half-lie on the bed, propped up by a pillow. Read a book. Place cookies next to you on the sheet so that the crumbs get in the bed. As you eat the cookies, remove each chocolate chip and place it on your stomach. When all the cookies are consumed, eat the chips one by one, allowing two per page.
  14. 14. Milk shake: Bite off one end of the paper covering the straw. Lift straw out of shake, put bottom end in mouth, release finger, and swallow. Do this until the straw is squished so that you cant suck through it. Ask for another. Open it the same way, but this time shoot the paper at the waitress when she isn't looking. Sip your shake casually – you are just minding your own business – until there is about an inch of shake remaining. Then blow through the straw until bubbles rise to the top of the glass. When your father says he’s had just about enough get a stomachache.
  15. 15. Evaluate  What was the author’s purpose for writing this essay?  Was it to entertain or inform.  Support you response with at least one detail from the text.
  16. 16. O B J E C T I V E : S T U D E N T S W I L L B E A B L E T O A P P L Y T H E B I G 6 R E A D I N G S T R A T E G I E S A S T H E Y R E A D T H E S H O R T S T O R Y “ A L L A M E R I C A N S L U R P ” “All American Slurp”
  17. 17. Pre-Reading Drill Have you ever been embarrassed by a member of your family? (Record your response in your Reader’s Notebook) Objective: Students will be able to apply the Big 6 Reading strategies as they read the Short Story “All American Slurp”
  18. 18. Predictions Based on the title and the picture in your text, what predictions can you make about this story? Objective: Students will be able to apply the Big 6 Reading strategies as they read the Short Story “all American Slurp”
  19. 19. As you read…  Select ONE word that you are unfamiliar with as your vocabulary word for the story. Record the word and the sentence in which you found it.  Use one of each of the Big 6 strategies to respond to the story while you are reading. (We will work through this part together) Objective: Students will be able to apply the Big 6 Reading strategies as they read the Short Story “All American Slurp”
  20. 20. After you read… connect to the main character  Have you ever felt like the main character? When and why?  Have you ever felt uncomfortable in a social situation? Objective: Students will be able to apply the Big 6 Reading strategies as they read the Short Story “All American Slurp”
  21. 21. As you read… Objective: Students will be able to apply the Big 6 Reading strategies as they read the Short Story “All American Slurp”
  22. 22. Objective: Students will be able to apply the Big 6 Reading strategies as they read the Short Story “all American Slurp”

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