Successfully reported this slideshow.

Social Media and Mentoring: Policies, Gaps, and Boundaries Webinar

2,202 views

Published on

This Webinar was presented as the first in a series exploring issues important to youth mentoring programs on August 17, 2010. Social media and networking offer numerous ways to professionally engage with youth, serving both program needs and youth adaptability. However, technology can also bring up questions about safety, boundaries, and appropriateness. Social Media and Mentoring: Policies, Gaps, and Boundaries explores social media and networking options and provides space for dialogue to explore safety and ethical considerations.

Published in: Education

Social Media and Mentoring: Policies, Gaps, and Boundaries Webinar

  1. 1. Social Media and Mentoring: Policies, Transforming lives through the power of mentoring Gaps, Boundaries
 Friends for Youth’s Mentoring Institute August 2010 Webinar
  2. 2. Transforming lives through the power of mentoring Sarah Kremer, ATR-BC Program Director Friends for Youth’s Mentoring Institute
  3. 3. Case Study: •  Agreed to pursue strategy •  Collected account info from previous efforts •  Set goals: mentor recruitment & fundraising •  Set strategies: –  Focus on 5 existing social media sites (blog, Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube) –  Connect various messages to web site & emails –  Survey constituents (volunteers, supporters, clients) –  Explore user-generated content
  4. 4. ******* Sarah Kremer, ATR-BC Program Director, Mentoring Institute + Bay Area Mentoring Friends for Youth, Inc. tel: 650-559-0200 mail: 1741 Broadway, First Floor Redwood City, CA 94063 Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and our Blog! http://www.facebook.com/pages/Friends-for-Youth/105093182858863 http://twitter.com/friendsforyouth http://www.friendsforyouth.blogspot.com/
  5. 5. Wabi-sabi [Wabi-sabi] nurtures all that is authentic by acknowledging three simple realities: nothing lasts, nothing is finished, and nothing is perfect. Powell, Richard R. (2004). Wabi Sabi Simple. Adams Media. ISBN 1-59337-178-0 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wabi-sabi
  6. 6. Agenda •  Social Media/Networking •  Program Policies •  Adult/Youth Gaps •  Exploring Boundaries Agency + Relationship Lenses
  7. 7. !"#$%&'()*$%+',)--$./'-0)'1"2*'34-'$.'-0)'5)6'7.8"29%-$".':/)' ;)8)2).#)'%.*';)<"42#)<' !"#$%&'()*$+#,()$-).,/')0#$ Social Media/Networking Options $ http://www.briansolis.com/2008/08/introducing‐conversation‐prism/
 1).#*$2&.3)'3$4.5&67)3(&.$ 2&..(#$8##'#9$:;#6<$=&3$2&..#'3/$ K#(,($L,)7/9$1*).#3$2).'#6$
  8. 8. Best Information: Beth Kanter •  http://www.bethkanter.org •  Beth’s Blog: How Networked Nonprofits Are Using Social Media to Power Change and Beth’s Tweets •  The Networked Nonprofit
  9. 9. Beth Kanter, http://www.bethkanter.org
  10. 10. If You Build It… • http:// mentoringcoalitionsanmateo county.ning.com/ R.I.P. 04/03/08 – 08/20/10
  11. 11. Agency/program presence 14%
 16%
 

0%
 

0%
 

0%
 

2%
 

0%
 

2%
 

4%
 

0%
 

2%
 31%
 48%
 

0%
 19%
 

6%
 87%
 

7%
 33%
 Friends
for
Youth
Technology
Survey
08/15/10

  12. 12. Purpose 86% 76% 73% 50% ??? Friends
for
Youth
Technology
Survey
08/15/10

  13. 13. Outreach/marketing •  Blogging 80% •  Email marketing to internal list 96% •  Facebook 95% •  Search Engine Marketing 100% •  Search Engine Optimization 100% •  Twitter 91% •  Updates to web site 96% Friends
for
Youth
Technology
Survey
08/15/10

  14. 14. Measuring Success •  Comments/feedback 53% •  Registered members 47% •  Site visitors 35% •  Fundraising
revenue
14% •  Conversions 8% •  User generated content 7% Friends
for
Youth
Technology
Survey
08/15/10

  15. 15. Agenda •  Social Media/Networking •  Program Policies •  Adult/Youth Gaps •  Exploring Boundaries Agency + Relationship Lenses
  16. 16. Policies •  Purpose •  Responsibility •  Authenticity •  Audience •  Good Judgment & Common Sense •  Community •  Copyrights and Fair Use •  Privacy, Confidentiality, Proprietary Information •  Value •  Productivity •  Protocol for Non-staff
  17. 17. Policies PolicyTool for Social Media http://socialmedia.policytool.net/
  18. 18. Why Are Ethics Important? Because a personal relationship is at the heart of mentoring interventions, inconsistencies, misunderstandings, and terminations can touch on youth’s vulnerabilities in ways that other, less personal, approaches do not. Rhodes, Liang, Spencer, 2009
  19. 19. Why Are Ethics Important? •  Increases in negative • 
Disappointment
 risk behavior • 
Rejection
 •  Decreases in • 
Betrayal
 emotional well-being •  Stalled or failed • 
Conflict
 academic outcomes Rhodes, Liang, Spencer, 2009
  20. 20. Ethical Principles for 
 Youth Mentoring Relationships •  Promote Welfare and Safety of Youth •  Be Trustworthy and Responsible •  Act with Integrity •  Promote Justice for Youth •  Respect Youth’s Rights and Dignity Rhodes, Liang, Spencer, 2009
  21. 21. Ethical Principles Policies •  Photograph & identity releases – use by mentors? •  Monitoring communication via different technologies •  Training & expectations
  22. 22. Communication: Program Participants •  Checking in/saying hello •  Having conversations •  Connect exclusively through online technology •  Schedule activities •  Sharing other material (pictures, blogs, tweets) •  Other
  23. 23. Communication: Program Participants •  Checking in/saying hello 62% •  Schedule activities 52% •  Sharing other material 39% (pictures, blogs, tweets) •  Having conversations 28% •  None 20% •  Unsure 15% •  Connect exclusively 5% through online technology Friends
for
Youth
Technology
Survey
08/15/10

  24. 24. Agenda •  Social Media/Networking •  Program Policies •  Adult/Youth Gaps •  Exploring Boundaries Agency + Relationship Lenses
  25. 25. Adult/Youth Gaps
  26. 26. Friends
for
Youth
Technology
Survey
08/15/10

  27. 27. Staff: •  Safety & monitoring issues •  Non-staff misrepresenting agency •  Waste of time & energy •  Volunteers go outside of agency for support/ feedback •  Loss of control overall •  Responding to negative material •  Making mistakes
  28. 28. Agenda •  Social Media/Networking •  Program Policies •  Adult/Youth Gaps •  Exploring Boundaries Agency + Relationship Lenses
  29. 29. Professional vs. personal
  30. 30. Public vs. private
  31. 31. The Ethicist By RANDY COHEN Published: July 1, 2009 My friend is a popular eighth-grade teacher. She has a Facebook account and has been “friended” by many of her students, who make their pages available to her. Consequently, she has learned a lot about them, including the inevitable under-age drinking and drug use and occasional school-related mischief like cheating on tests or plagiarizing assignments. Must she report any of this to the school, the police or the parents? The school has no policy for dealing with this modern problem. A.S., NEW YORK http://www.nytimes.com/2009/07/05/magazine/05FOB-ethicist-t.html
  32. 32. The Ethicist By RANDY COHEN Published: July 1, 2009 This teacher should respond to students apt to get themselves into trouble, and the most significant peril you describe may not be a little teenage drinking or recreational drug use but the public exposure of this “mischief.” Your friend has a chance to teach these students about Internet privacy or the lack of it. She should carpe that diem. Were she simply to bust these online doofuses, she would squander a chance to convey something of lasting importance and leave them feeling that she had betrayed their trust. In short, her essential role is educator, not cop. Strictly speaking, when these students gave her access to their Facebook pages, they waived their right to privacy. But that’s not how many kids see it. To them, Facebook and the like occupy some weird twilight zone between public and private information, rather like a diary left on the kitchen table. That a photo of drunken antics might thwart a chance at a job or a scholarship is not something all kids seriously consider. This teacher can get them to think about that. She might send e-mail messages to transgressing students, noting their misdeeds and reminding them of their vulnerability. Or she could address her entire class, citing (anonymous) examples of student escapades. Or she could encourage her school to include a regular instructional session on the Internet and its pitfalls. This is not to advocate turning a blind eye to bad behavior. It is to establish priorities. If a kid is in genuine danger, she should intervene swiftly. When students violate academic standards, she should warn them sternly — in her first e-mail message — that the lesson has been conveyed, there are no more free passes and henceforth they can expect her to respond vigorously to anything she learns online. Your friend should also think about the boundaries she maintains between herself and her students. It is great that they can confide in her as long as she remembers that “confide in” is different from “gossip with,” and that she is their teacher, not their pal, a necessary distinction if she is to be effective as the former. http://www.nytimes.com/2009/07/05/magazine/05FOB-ethicist-t.html
  33. 33. Summary
  34. 34. •  FREQUENCY more = 30% of communication no change = 26% •  QUALITY more + = 31% of communication + and - = 26% •  Overall relationship mostly + = 42% + and - = 19% Friends
for
Youth
Technology
Survey
08/15/10

  35. 35. •  Very valuable 16% •  Valuable 23% •  Somewhat valuable 30% •  Not very valuable 27% •  Not valuable at all 3% Friends
for
Youth
Technology
Survey
08/15/10

  36. 36. •  Be ethical •  Be smart •  Be purposeful •  Be resourceful •  Be experimental •  Be productive
  37. 37. Questions?
  38. 38. Thank you! Slides
posted
to
SlideShare:
 http://www.slideshare.net/ sarahmentoring/social‐media‐ and‐mentoring‐policies‐gaps‐ and‐boundaries‐webinar
 Survey
open
until
August
31:
 http:// www.surveymonkey.com/s/ NZXY55C

  39. 39. www.mentoringinstitute.org 650-559-0200 •  Products and resources for mentoring programs http://www.facebook.com/pages/Friends-for-Youth/105093182858863 •  Trainings for program staff, mentors, and mentees http://twitter.com/friendsforyouth Check out our Blog •  Individual consultations http://www.friendsforyouth.blogspot.com/

×