Why	
  do	
  we	
  have	
  to	
  	
  
talk	
  about	
  this?	
  
!“In	
  the	
  United	
  States,	
  society’s	
  historic...
Case	
  Study:	
  	
  
Media	
  Reports	
  of	
  Accusa>ons	
  
•  01/11	
  Bal(more,	
  MD	
  B-­‐Moor	
  Youth	
  
Servi...
Occurrence*	
  
Safe	
  
Inappropriate	
  
* Visual representation only
Perpetrators	
  
In	
  	
  
System	
  
Convicted	
  
Arrested	
  
Inves(gated	
  
Accused	
  or	
  Iden(fied	
  
Never	
  A...
“	
  A	
  percentage	
  of	
  predators	
  will	
  target	
  
child-­‐service	
  groups	
  because	
  they	
  
provide	
  ...
Case	
  Study	
  
Kenneth	
  Lanning,	
  FBI	
  behavior	
  analyst,	
  
says	
  those	
  leading	
  double	
  lives,	
  
...
Case	
  Study	
  
Kenneth	
  Lanning,	
  FBI	
  behavior	
  analyst,	
  
says	
  those	
  leading	
  double	
  lives,	
  
...
Challenges	
  
Pressure	
  
to	
  conceal	
  
Unreported	
  
incidents	
  
No	
  mandated	
  
standards	
  
Inconsistencie...
Why	
  do	
  we	
  have	
  to	
  	
  
talk	
  about	
  this?	
  
Most	
  effec(ve:	
  	
  
educa>ng	
  youth	
  professiona...
Purpose	
  
•  Keep	
  perpetrators	
  from	
  becoming	
  mentors	
  to	
  
prevent	
  youth	
  from	
  becoming	
  abuse...
Mandated	
  Standards	
  
Research	
  
•  Mentor	
  screening	
  is	
  applicable	
  to	
  
all	
  types	
  of	
  programs,	
  prac(ces,	
  
organiz...
Research:	
  
Tools	
  &	
  
Processes	
  
•  None	
  found	
  to	
  evaluate	
  effec(veness	
  of	
  
screening	
  and	
 ...
SAFE	
  Training	
  
Training	
  program	
  focusing	
  on	
  increasing	
  mentor	
  
screening	
  and	
  monitoring	
  s...
Written !
materials!
External !
documents!
Impressions!Observations!
Informed!
Intuition!
Final!
Decision!
Highly	
  
Reco...
Red	
  Flags	
  
•  Amalgama(on	
  of	
  research	
  and	
  field	
  observa(ons	
  
of	
  youth-­‐serving	
  organiza(on	
...
Informed	
  Intui(on	
  
“I	
  have	
  inves(gated	
  hundreds	
  of	
  child	
  
predator	
  cases	
  involving	
  thousa...
Recommended	
  
Tools	
  and	
  
Prac(ces	
  
Throughout entire cycle
of volunteer’s contact
with agency:
Program Design
P...
If	
  this	
  training	
  doesn’t	
  apply	
  	
  
to	
  your	
  program	
  …	
  
• because you work closely with
well-kno...
Imagine	
  your	
  worst-­‐case	
  scenario…	
  
Could you look
back and defend
your process?!
Resources	
  
•  Upcoming	 SAFE	 Trainings
•  SAFE	 Training	 Certification
•  SAFE	 Trainers
•  Recommended	 Tools	 &	 Pr...
Cer(fied	
  SAFE	
  Trainers	
  
	
  
Sarah	
  Kremer,	
  Friends	
  for	
  
Youth,	
  Inc.	
  (West	
  Coast,	
  
na(onal)...
SAFE Training: Prioritizing Youth Safety with Research-Based Mentor Screening Practices
SAFE Training: Prioritizing Youth Safety with Research-Based Mentor Screening Practices
SAFE Training: Prioritizing Youth Safety with Research-Based Mentor Screening Practices
SAFE Training: Prioritizing Youth Safety with Research-Based Mentor Screening Practices
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

SAFE Training: Prioritizing Youth Safety with Research-Based Mentor Screening Practices

2,533 views

Published on

This is an abbreviated version of our full SAFE Training workshop. Looking for the full slide deck? Contact your Certified SAFE Trainer for the link and password.

This training focuses on the recommended tools and approaches from our resource SAFE (Screening Applicants for Effectiveness): Guidelines to Prevent Child Molestation in Mentoring and Youth-Serving Organizations that many programs already use in screening and assessing their volunteers. Adaptable to both those new to the field and those who are experienced in the field, this workshop addresses what is recommended and why, as well as how to use both subjective and objective components to make the best decision. Additionally, research gathered in the writing of the Mentor Screening and Youth Protection chapter for the 2nd edition of the Handbook of Youth Mentoring will be reviewed. This training is designed for Program Staff, Program Directors, Executive Directors, and Board Members.

Access the downloadable sample forms from SAFE Training at http://friendsforyouth.org/mentoring-institute/safe-trainings

Download the new recommendations at http://friendsforyouth.org/mentoring-institute/safe-trainings.

Based on research on perpetrators from related allied fields (psychology, social work, education, and youth development) and practitioner knowledge in youth mentoring, this list of Minimum Standard and Highly Recommended tools and processes can help your program know what to put in place to ensure youth safety.

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
2,533
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1,510
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

SAFE Training: Prioritizing Youth Safety with Research-Based Mentor Screening Practices

  1. 1. Why  do  we  have  to     talk  about  this?   !“In  the  United  States,  society’s  historical   a<tude  about  sexual  vic>miza>on  of   children  can  generally  be  summed  up  in   one  word:  denial.”     Lanning,  Child  Molesters:  A  Behavioral  Analysis  
  2. 2. Case  Study:     Media  Reports  of  Accusa>ons   •  01/11  Bal(more,  MD  B-­‐Moor  Youth   Services  Execu(ve  Director   •  12/10  Monterey,  CA  BBBS    mentor   •  10/10  Bal(more,  MD  Friendship   Academy  mentor   •  08/10  Franklin,  NJ  residen(al  home   counselor/mentor  (female)   •  08/10  Mobile,  AL  Mobile  Youth   Advocate  Program  mentor   •  05/10  Bartow,  FL  career  mentor     •  02/10  Danbury,  CT  Jericho  Partnership   Execu(ve  Director   •  01/10  DC  Peaceaholics  Counselor/ Mentor   •  11/09 Grand Rapids, MI Public School mentor/advocate •  11/09 St. Paul, MN Public School coach/mentor •  10/09 Buffalo, NY caseworker/mentor (registered sex offender) •  08/09 Lakeland, FL church mentor (informal) •  07/09 Tulsa, OK Big Brothers Big Sisters mentor •  06/09 San Diego, CA church minister/ music teacher/volunteer •  01/08 Nashville, TN Big Pal Little Pal •  12/06 Boulder, CO Boulder County Partners mentor
  3. 3. Occurrence*   Safe   Inappropriate   * Visual representation only
  4. 4. Perpetrators   In     System   Convicted   Arrested   Inves(gated   Accused  or  Iden(fied   Never  Accused  or  Iden(fied  
  5. 5. “  A  percentage  of  predators  will  target   child-­‐service  groups  because  they   provide  access  to  samples  of  highly   vulnerable  children  and  oUen  there  are   opportuni(es  for  isolated  access.  Many   of  these  children  have  already  been   molested,  making  them  more   vulnerable  to  the  predator.”     Dr.  Perry  Sirota  
  6. 6. Case  Study   Kenneth  Lanning,  FBI  behavior  analyst,   says  those  leading  double  lives,   especially  sex  offenders,  can  become   quite  adept  at  compartmentalizing   their  behavior.  “The  person  may  look   normal:  have  a  job,  work  hard,  go  to   church.  The  indicators  are  things  the   average  person  is  not  trained  to   recognize.”  
  7. 7. Case  Study   Kenneth  Lanning,  FBI  behavior  analyst,   says  those  leading  double  lives,   especially  sex  offenders,  can  become   quite  adept  at  compartmentalizing   their  behavior.  “The  person  may  look   normal:  have  a  job,  work  hard,  go  to   church.  The  indicators  are  things  the   average  person  is  not  trained  to   recognize.”   You  are  not   the  average   person!  
  8. 8. Challenges   Pressure   to  conceal   Unreported   incidents   No  mandated   standards   Inconsistencies   across   agencies   Patchwork   of  state/ federal   statutes   Database/ human   errors   Clearance   does  not   equal  safety   Low  law   enforcement   priority   DENIAL  
  9. 9. Why  do  we  have  to     talk  about  this?   Most  effec(ve:     educa>ng  youth  professionals     Least  effec(ve:     educa>ng  youth  
  10. 10. Purpose   •  Keep  perpetrators  from  becoming  mentors  to   prevent  youth  from  becoming  abused   •  Not  to  “prove”  or  inves(gate  –  just  prevent   from  entering  program   •  If  applicant  has  numerous  items  of  concern  in   process  or  staff  has  elevated  sense  of  unease,   may  want  to  contact  local  law  enforcement  
  11. 11. Mandated  Standards  
  12. 12. Research   •  Mentor  screening  is  applicable  to   all  types  of  programs,  prac(ces,   organiza(ons,  seangs  that  serve   youth   – Provide  introduc(on  and  access  to   highly  vulnerable  children   – Gain  trust  of  parents  and  legi(mize   rela(onship  
  13. 13. Research:   Tools  &   Processes   •  None  found  to  evaluate  effec(veness  of   screening  and  monitoring  prac(ces   –  Specific  tool  to  iden(fy  poten(al  physical   abusers   –  Survey  on  exis(ng  tools/processes  with  no   analysis  of  effec(veness   –  The  Diana  Screen  research  is  unavailable  to   general  public   •  Use  research  on  perpetrators  and   prac((oner  knowledge  (also  Evidence-­‐ Based)  
  14. 14. SAFE  Training   Training  program  focusing  on  increasing  mentor   screening  and  monitoring  standards     •  Purpose  and  Relevance   •  Perpetrators,  Vic(ms,  Dynamics            of  the  Abuse   •  Holis(c  Portrait  Approach:   – Informed  Intui(on  and  Red  Flags   – Recommended  Tools  &  Processes  
  15. 15. Written ! materials! External ! documents! Impressions!Observations! Informed! Intuition! Final! Decision! Highly   Recommended   by  Research:   Crea(ng     Holis(c     Portrait   of     Applicant  
  16. 16. Red  Flags   •  Amalgama(on  of  research  and  field  observa(ons   of  youth-­‐serving  organiza(on  staff  and  law   enforcement  officials   •  One  Red  Flag  does  not  indicate  applicant  is   perpetrator;  look  for  paierns  and  consistent   repea(ng  informa(on     Review  your  own  program’s  rejec>on     files  to  look  for  paVerns  
  17. 17. Informed  Intui(on   “I  have  inves(gated  hundreds  of  child   predator  cases  involving  thousands  of   vic(ms.  In  the  case  of  every  single   vic(m,  there  was  a  woman  -­‐-­‐  mother,   agency  staff,  teacher  -­‐-­‐  who  looked   back  and  said,  “I  thought  something   wasn’t  right.  I  had  a  funny  feeling   about  him.”     Detec>ve  Steven  McEwan,  SJPD  Child  Exploita>on  Unit  
  18. 18. Recommended   Tools  and   Prac(ces   Throughout entire cycle of volunteer’s contact with agency: Program Design Preparing Mentees and Parents/Guardians Volunteer Recruitment Application Process Post-match
  19. 19. If  this  training  doesn’t  apply     to  your  program  …   • because you work closely with well-known company/organization! • because your volunteers meet with youth in closely-supervised environment! • because you have good feeling about your volunteers! • because you know youth would tell you if something was wrong!
  20. 20. Imagine  your  worst-­‐case  scenario…   Could you look back and defend your process?!
  21. 21. Resources   •  Upcoming SAFE Trainings •  SAFE Training Certification •  SAFE Trainers •  Recommended Tools & Processes •  Sample Forms •  Presentation •  Tips •  Statistics •  Resources •  More! http://friendsforyouth.org/mentoring- institute/safe-trainings/
  22. 22. Cer(fied  SAFE  Trainers     Sarah  Kremer,  Friends  for   Youth,  Inc.  (West  Coast,   na(onal)     Meghan  Perry,  Oregon   Mentors  (Northwest)         Whitney  Mas(n,  Midlands   Mentoring  Partnership   (Midwest)     Clara  Carter,  Management   Consul(ng  Services  (East   Coast,  na(onal)       Jen  Lindwall,  Mentoring   Partnership  of  Minnesota   (Midwest)       Jaci  McKeever,  TeamMates   Mentoring  Program   (Midwest)  

×