Summit2012 proposal-sarah maddox

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My proposal for Atlassian Summit 2012

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  • Confluence – The art of collaboration. Aim is to attract a new customer segment: Publishers and publishing teams Authors Also a real-life example of: How Confluence is valuable to all sorts of teams – not just software development. One of the wiki's strongest advantages – Confluence as an extensible platform
  • There’s a book in everyone. The trouble is, it's hard to get it out of you. It's a lot like having a baby. Having the idea is the fun part…
  • … Then the project grows and grows. Getting the book out there is a multi-person project. It’s all about the people and collaboration. You work with a loose team. People join at the appropriate time: Author Publisher Artist Technical reviewers Copy editor Indexer Ward Cunningham reviewed the section about his most recent work. So yes, producing a book is a lot like having a baby. In fact, my book took 9 months of hard labour…
  • We need a wiki, quick! In the presentation, I’ll go on to talk about: How the wiki helps the publishing team produce the book, from conception to production. The technical details of the wiki and plugins. The publisher’s use of DocBook in the print-on-demand publishing process. ============== MORE – THE PUBLISHER’s EXPERIENCE ============= I asked the publisher for some words about his experience of producing a book on a wiki. From the publisher: The main advantage of using a wiki is how it improves the review process. Here are a few ways this works: 1) Review comments can be kept in one place, making it easier to keep track of comments and make sure they are all addressed. 2) Each reviewer can see the comments from every other reviewer. This reduces duplicate comments and gives reviewers the opportunity to agree (or disagree) with each other's comments. 3) We also found with Alan's books that we got better participation when we used a wiki for review comments. I'm not exactly sure why, but I suspect it has to do with the public nature of comments; that is, when you see other people adding comments, you're more likely to participate so you don't look like a slacker:). Other advantages include: 1) Easier authoring than many alternatives (e.g., XML, and even Word (at least for folks like me:)). 2) Version control. You can go back to an earlier version easily and compare two versions. 3) You can set up reporting, so editors, publisher, and writer get email whenever a change is made. With your project, of course, we also had a very nice DocBook export with coding for lots of nice goodies, like indexes, footnotes, etc.
  • Confluence as a platform In the presentation, I’ll go on to talk about: Scroll Wiki DocBook Exporter, and how we worked with K15t to enhance the plugin so that it could produce footnotes, index, image captions. How this makes Confluence a great platform – you can innovate, and get what you want into the product
  • It’s not over ‘til the wiki sings. New in the publishing world: A book does not end at printing. The conversation continues, amongst readers and authors and the whole wide world. What better place than the wiki? http://wikitechcomm.onconfluence.com
  • Summit2012 proposal-sarah maddox

    1. 1. Publishing a book Need a wiki quick! Atlassian Summit May-June 2012, San Francisco
    2. 2. Summit track and target market <ul><li>New target market: </li></ul><ul><li>Publishers </li></ul><ul><li>Authors </li></ul><ul><li>Real-life example </li></ul>Confluence The art of collaboration
    3. 3. Any author or publisher can tell you There’s a book in everyone It’s hard to get it out of you Trouble is...
    4. 4. It’s a team activity, right from conception Author Artist Reviewers Editor Publisher Indexer
    5. 5. 9 months’ labour – the content phase 15 May Submit proposal 3 Jun 31 Dec Content deadline Writing 15 Feb Production 3 Dec
    6. 6. 9 months’ labour – the content phase 15 May Submit proposal 3 Jun 31 Dec 15 Jun 15 Feb Content deadline Writing Admin and technical setup Production 3 Dec
    7. 7. 9 months’ labour – the content phase 15 May Submit proposal 3 Jun 27 Nov 31 Dec 15 Jun Content deadline Writing Admin and technical setup 15 Feb Production 3 Dec Artwork and promotion
    8. 8. 9 months’ labour – the content phase 15 May Submit proposal 3 Jun 27 Nov 3 Dec 31 Dec 15 Jun Content deadline Writing Admin and technical setup Technical review 15 Feb Production Artwork and promotion
    9. 9. 9 months’ labour – the content phase 15 May Submit proposal 3 Jun 27 Nov 3 Dec 31 Dec 15 Jun 22 Dec Content deadline Writing Admin and technical setup Artwork and promotion Technical review Index, footnotes, etc 15 Feb Production
    10. 10. 9 months’ labour – the production phase 15 May Submit proposal 3 Jun 27 Nov 3 Dec 15 Jun 22 Dec 7 Jan 5 Feb Content deadline Copy edit Final proofs Printing 31 Dec 15 Feb Production
    11. 11. We need a wiki, quick <ul><li>How we collaborated on the wiki </li></ul><ul><li>Wiki plus plugins </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Confluence </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Gliffy for the diagrams </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Scroll Wiki DocBook Exporter </li></ul></ul><ul><li>DocBook to PDF, print and ebook </li></ul>There’s more to talk about
    12. 12. Confluence as a platform <ul><li>Working with the plugin devs </li></ul><ul><li>Innovating and extending the wiki to get what you want </li></ul>There’s more to talk about even V
    13. 13. It’s not over ‘til the wiki sings The conversation continues on the wiki http://wikitechcomm.onconfluence.com
    14. 14. Summit extras <ul><li>Give away a free copy of the book at the session </li></ul><ul><li>Book signings </li></ul><ul><li>I’m in the US already for STC Summit in Chicago </li></ul>
    15. 15. Bye

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