Collaborative Opportunities In Erm

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A presentation delivered at the ER&L (Electronic Resources and Libraries) conference in Atlanta, March 2008. It looks at the potential of collaborative technologies and practices that could transform the management of electronic resources, particularly e-journals, in libraries today.

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Collaborative Opportunities In Erm

  1. 1. Collaborative opportunities in electronic resource management using emerging web technologies Electronic Resources & Libraries, 2008. Sarah Bartlett Senior Analyst, Talis Information Ltd. Wednesday 19 th March, 2008
  2. 2. Web 2.0 and electronic resources
  3. 3. Collaborative opportunities in electronic resource management using emerging web technologies <ul><li>Why is collaboration fundamentally necessary with ERM? </li></ul><ul><li>What opportunities does Web 2.0 open up? </li></ul><ul><li>Some obstacles to collaboration in ERM </li></ul><ul><li>A glimpse at what might be possible with Web 3.0 </li></ul>
  4. 5. Collaborative electronic resource management
  5. 6. eResources are impacting every area of the library’s operations e-Resources are now an essential part of the library service, and as such, have a lot of internal stakeholders. University of Wolverhampton
  6. 7. The eProduct marketplace is in a state of constant change
  7. 8. This new era calls for a different library management style
  8. 9. This new era calls for a different library management style It’s an area that is very difficult to write procedures for, as the situation changes on an almost daily basis. This in turn makes it difficult to standardise practice for a team of people to take on the work, rather than relying on an individual to build up expertise. University of Surrey
  9. 10. Collaboration on multiple levels <ul><li>Between institutions </li></ul><ul><li>Across the institution </li></ul><ul><li>Across the library </li></ul>
  10. 11. Collaboration on multiple levels <ul><li>Between institutions </li></ul><ul><li>Across the institution </li></ul><ul><li>Across the library </li></ul>
  11. 12. Where is the pain? <ul><li>Complexity and fickleness of e-products </li></ul><ul><li>Inaccurate information about those e-products </li></ul><ul><li>Weight of administration around e-products </li></ul><ul><li>Evaluating e-products around a myriad of criteria </li></ul><ul><li>Maximising the visibility of e-resources to the end-user </li></ul>
  12. 13. What does it look like from the outside?
  13. 14. How can collaboration help?
  14. 15. Data that can be created once In the printed era… In the electronic era…
  15. 16. Data that can be created many times In the printed era… In the electronic era…
  16. 17. The general principles of Web 2.0 <ul><li>Participative </li></ul><ul><li>User-centred </li></ul><ul><li>Sharing </li></ul><ul><li>Communication and community </li></ul><ul><li>Remixing diverse sources </li></ul><ul><li>Smart </li></ul><ul><li>Based on trust </li></ul>
  17. 18. How can Web 2.0 and collaborative practices stop the pain?
  18. 19. Where is the pain? <ul><li>Complexity and fickleness of e-products </li></ul><ul><li>Inaccurate information about those e-products </li></ul>
  19. 20. <ul><li>The fundamental problem identified as lack of comprehensive structured accurate data </li></ul><ul><li>Inefficiencies across the supply chain </li></ul>The transfer of titles between publishers is arguably our biggest problem. There are always problems with the quality of data in the knowledgebase. There is definitely a case for a collaborative community piece. We’re often reporting this sort of thing to our link resolver vendor so the knowledgebase can be updated. Kings College London
  20. 21. <ul><li>The fundamental problem identified as lack of comprehensive structured accurate data; </li></ul><ul><li>Inefficiencies across the supply chain </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Multiple link resolvers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Multiple library notifications </li></ul></ul>
  21. 22. How would a collaborative approach to knowledgebases help?
  22. 23. Where is the pain? <ul><li>Evaluating e-products around a myriad of criteria </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Qualitative </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Quantitative </li></ul></ul>
  23. 24. How would a collaborative approach help with qualitative evaluation? Using feedback from a subject librarian at another institution would definitely be useful, especially if It was the same or a similar subject. Focus Group Attendee It would be good to see other universities’ feedback for trials. University of Birmingham
  24. 25. How would a collaborative approach help with quantitative evaluation?
  25. 26. Where is the pain? <ul><li>Maximising the visibility of e-resources to the end-user </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Advisory notices of planned downtime </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Information literacy </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Troubleshooting </li></ul></ul>
  26. 27. How would a collaborative approach help with advisory notices of planned downtime?
  27. 28. How would a collaborative approach help with information literacy?
  28. 29. How would a collaborative approach help with troubleshooting?
  29. 30. Paul Miller’s principles of Web 2.0 <ul><li>Participative – qualitative evaluations of e-resources </li></ul><ul><li>User-centred – throughout the lifecycle </li></ul><ul><li>Sharing – usage statistics to improve decision-making </li></ul><ul><li>Communication and community – a community-centred knowledgebase </li></ul><ul><li>Based on trust – the big pre-requisite. </li></ul>
  30. 31. Should we adopt a collaborative approach to the whole of ERM?
  31. 32. Acquisitions
  32. 33. Licensing Social software has some mileage in the realm of licensing. There is a parallel here with cataloguing. It would be particularly beneficial for NESLI which is the same for everyone. There is occasional divergence by publisher or by library. Kings College London
  33. 34. What are the obstacles? Organisational Legal Industrial
  34. 35. However… If a communal licensing repository cuts down queries from libraries arising from package / title changes, for example, then publishers may embrace it. University of Wolverhampton
  35. 36. Web 3.0 Future Possibilities <ul><li>Usage statistics </li></ul>In a survey 4 years ago, academics were able to vote on journals. The results of this survey are still referred to. Imperial College London
  36. 37. Web 3.0 Future Possibilities <ul><li>Usage statistics </li></ul><ul><li>Selecting participants for trials </li></ul><ul><li>A collection development and acquisitions policy </li></ul>Journals on global warming are not highly used but Imperial has a dedicated centre for research into global warming. So Imperial are wary of comparing apples with pears. It’s more of an art than a science. Imperial College London
  37. 38. Recommended reading <ul><li>Conger, Joan E. </li></ul><ul><li>Collaborative electronic resource management: from acquisitions to assessment. </li></ul><ul><li>Westport: Libraries Unlimited, 2004 </li></ul><ul><li>Emery, Jill </li></ul><ul><li>Ghosts in the machine: the promise of electronic resource management tools </li></ul><ul><li>Serials librarian 51(3/4), 2007 </li></ul><ul><li>Miller, Paul </li></ul><ul><li>Web 2.0: building the new library </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue45/miller/ </li></ul><ul><li>Culling, James </li></ul><ul><li>Link resolvers and the serials supply chain </li></ul><ul><li>UKSG, 2007 </li></ul>
  38. 39. Collaborative opportunities in electronic resource management using emerging web technologies Electronic Resources & Libraries, 2008. Sarah Bartlett Senior Analyst, Talis Information Ltd. Wednesday 19 th March, 2008
  39. 40. shared innovation

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