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Online Elementary Algebra
A Strategy for Student Success in
Developmental Mathematics
UCSD Ext Online Learning Practicum
S...
An all too familiar problem…
. . . endlessly repeating the same non-credit course . . .
The Overwhelmed Developmental Math...
Challenges for Developmental Learners
Academic Challenges
• Poor study habits
• Lacking in skills
development
• Does not s...
Lost time . . . Lost money . . . Lost dreams
Implications for Course . . .
Weakens learning community
High failure/drop rate
Implications for College . . .
• Decreased retention rates
• Increased Average Time-to-Degree rates
WHAT QUESTIONS LEAD US TO A
MORE EFFECTIVE SOLUTION?
What Improves Retention and the
Average Time-to-Degree?
“The majority of factors proven to improve student retention are
r...
How Does Math Factor In?
“Underscoring the importance of this issue, a number of
researchers and institutions have witness...
Teacher-Centered vs. Learner-Centered
{Learner-Centered Assessment on College Campuses by Huba and Freed 2000}
Teacher-cen...
What Is Active Learning?
• The process of having students engage in some activity that
forces them to reflect upon ideas a...
Why Use Active Learning?
“Active learning pedagogies have been found to
provide a significant advantage over passive
appro...
Why Does Active Learning Work?
“Basically, active learning gets your students
to think, specifically in ways that foster l...
A Sampling of Online Tools
• LMS Content modules
• Multi-media
Videos
Slideshows
Widgets & Apps
• Blog
• Wiki
• Discuss...
Learning
Component
Academic
Challenges
Social
Challenges
Strengthen
Community
Student
Accountability
Learner
Engagement
LM...
What Will It Cost?
• Development costs = Zero $
– Developed by course instructor
– Uses existing LMS framework
• Overhead ...
LET’S GET STARTED!
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Benefits of Online Developmental Mathematics

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Incorporating online active learning components into your developmental mathematics courses creates value for your students and your school. Student success leads to student retention. Here's a short presentation that will help get educators and schools up to speed on measurable advantages.

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Benefits of Online Developmental Mathematics

  1. 1. Online Elementary Algebra A Strategy for Student Success in Developmental Mathematics UCSD Ext Online Learning Practicum Summer 2014 Sara Revesz
  2. 2. An all too familiar problem… . . . endlessly repeating the same non-credit course . . . The Overwhelmed Developmental Math Student
  3. 3. Challenges for Developmental Learners Academic Challenges • Poor study habits • Lacking in skills development • Does not see value in assignments and courses • Feedback too little too late Social Challenges • Weakened community – Alienation and social isolation – Subject to negative peer pressure • Disconnected from faculty and advisors
  4. 4. Lost time . . . Lost money . . . Lost dreams
  5. 5. Implications for Course . . . Weakens learning community High failure/drop rate
  6. 6. Implications for College . . . • Decreased retention rates • Increased Average Time-to-Degree rates
  7. 7. WHAT QUESTIONS LEAD US TO A MORE EFFECTIVE SOLUTION?
  8. 8. What Improves Retention and the Average Time-to-Degree? “The majority of factors proven to improve student retention are related to academic goals, academic-related skills, and academic self- confidence.” {“Improving Student Retention and Graduation Rates,” September 2011, Hanover Research Report}
  9. 9. How Does Math Factor In? “Underscoring the importance of this issue, a number of researchers and institutions have witnessed a connection between performance in college-level mathematics and retention and graduation.” {N. Shulock and J. Koester. “Maximizing Resources for Student Success by Reducing Time- and Credits-to-Degree,” July 2014.}
  10. 10. Teacher-Centered vs. Learner-Centered {Learner-Centered Assessment on College Campuses by Huba and Freed 2000} Teacher-centered (passive) • Teacher’s role = information giver & evaluator, student is learner • Knowledge transmitted o Lecture, Listening/Reading & Independent Study o Acquisition emphasized • Goal is the right answer • Assignments and exams for summative purposes • Teaching & Assessment separate • Assessment is indirect & monitors learning Learner-centered (active) • Teacher’s role = coach & facilitator, all are learners • Knowledge constructed o Online, asynchronous, self- directed/collaborative/cooperative/ Problem-based learning o Synthesizing/Integrating emphasized • Goal is asking better questions & learning from errors • Assignments for formative purposes • Teaching & Assessment together • Assessment is direct and promotes & diagnosis learning
  11. 11. What Is Active Learning? • The process of having students engage in some activity that forces them to reflect upon ideas and how they are using those ideas. • Requiring students to regularly assess their own degree of understanding and skill at handling concepts or problems in a particular discipline. • The attainment of knowledge by participating or contributing. • The process of keeping students mentally, and often physically, active in their learning through activities that involve them in gathering information, thinking, and problem solving. {The Greenwood Dictionary of Education}
  12. 12. Why Use Active Learning? “Active learning pedagogies have been found to provide a significant advantage over passive approaches in terms of acquiring subject matter knowledge and academic skills.” • {Cf. Joel Michael, “Where's the evidence that active learning works?” Adv Physiol Educ 30: 159–167, 2006.} • {Derek Bok Center for Teaching and Learning Resources, Harvard University.}
  13. 13. Why Does Active Learning Work? “Basically, active learning gets your students to think, specifically in ways that foster learning, knowledge construction and retention. It invokes cognitive processes such as mental rehearsal, metacognitive awareness, social learning and knowledge integration.” • {M. Prince, “Does Active Learning Work? A Review of the Research.” J. Engr. Education, 93(3), 223-231 (2004).} • {See more research at ablconnect (Harvard University).}
  14. 14. A Sampling of Online Tools • LMS Content modules • Multi-media Videos Slideshows Widgets & Apps • Blog • Wiki • Discussions • Adaptive learning software - eBook • Virtual study rooms • Assessment activities
  15. 15. Learning Component Academic Challenges Social Challenges Strengthen Community Student Accountability Learner Engagement LMS Content modules X X X Multi-media (videos, slideshows, online widgets & apps) X X X Blog X X X X X Wiki X X X X X Discussions X X X X X Adaptive learning software & eBook X X X Virtual study rooms X X X X X Assessment activities X X X X Connection between a Sampling of Online Tools and Student Growth {“Innovative Practices for Improving Student Performance in College Level Mathematics,” September 2011, Hanover Research Report.}
  16. 16. What Will It Cost? • Development costs = Zero $ – Developed by course instructor – Uses existing LMS framework • Overhead Costs = Less/Same $ – Facilitated by course instructor – Supported by IT department • Student Costs – Computer – Internet access – Adaptive Learning Software & eBook
  17. 17. LET’S GET STARTED!

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