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Mahesh g ame

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Mahesh g ame

  1. 1. JSPM’SCHARAK COLLEGE OF PHARMACY & RESEARCH,GAT NO-720/1&2, WAGHOLI, PUNE-NAGAR ROAD , PUNE -412207A SEMINAR ON INSTRUMENTATION OF GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY PRESENTED BY, GUIDED BY, MISS. MAHESH GAME DR. RAJESH J. OSWAL PROF.SANDIP KSHIRSAGARDEPARTMENT OF PHARMACEUTICAL CHEMISTRY
  2. 2. Content’s1 Introduction2 Carrier Gas -Selection of Gases -Control of Flow -Gas Sources and Purity3 Sample Inlets -Syringes and Switching Valves -Pyrolysis4 Ovens- Conventional DesignsOther Designs for Control of Column Temp.5 Detectors and Data Systems- Detectors-Data Systems
  3. 3. 1. Introduction: The key parts of a gas chromatography include: a source of gas asthe mobile phase, an inlet to deliver sample to a column, the columnwhere separations occur, an oven as a thermostat for the column, adetector to register the presence of a chemical in the column effluent, anda data system to record and display the chromatogram. The column may arguably be considered the key component of agas chromatograph and accordingly has been treated separately underanother heading. However, the total variance of a separation (sT) willconform to principles of error propagation and be a sum of variancesfrom the injector (sI), column (sc), detector (sd), and data system (sds). Thus, each of these components contributes to the overallefficiency of a GC separation and merits individual attention.
  4. 4. # Schematic diagram of GC Instrumentation.
  5. 5. 2. Carrier gas : The carrier gas or mobile phase in GC is an essential, butlimiting, facet in separations. Carrier gas is the means to moveconstituents of a sample through the column and yet the choiceof possible gases is restricted. Unlike liquid chromatography(where a wide selection of mobile phase compositions may bepossible), very little can be gained in separations throughaltering the mobile phase composition to influence the partitioncoefficient (k) or separation factor (a) in GC. 2.1 Selection of Gases - The choice of a practical carrier gas is simple:nitrogen or helium. Air may be used as a carrier gas under certain conditions with portable or on-site chromatographs but this is uncommon with laboratory-scale instruments. A GC separation using nitrogen at 10 cm s-1 can beaccomplished with comparable separating efficiency usinghelium at 50–60 cm s-1.
  6. 6. 2.2 Control of flow- When temperature is increased for a column with constantpressure on the inlet, the average flow rate in the column willdecrease owing to increased viscosity of the gas mobilephase in a proportional but nonlinear manner. Under such conditions, flow rates may slow at hightemperature and both separation speed and efficiency maysuffer. Flow may be kept constant through mass flow metersthat have inlet and outlet orifices, adjustable based uponpressure differences.Constant flow can be delivered across arange of pressure drops that may arise due to changes intemperature but cannot compensate for changes inbarometric pressure. 2.3 Gas sources & Purity A common gas source for nitrogen or helium is the pressurizedcylinder or bottled gas supply, readily supplied as a steel tank witha two-stage pressure regulator.This is still a common gas sourcethough gas generators for nitrogen (air and hydrogen too) can becommercially competitive with bottled gas and have advantages insafety.
  7. 7. 3.SampleInlets: The chromatographic process begins when sample isintroduced into the column, ideally without disrupting flows inthe column. The chromatographic results will be reproduciblein as much as this is accomplished with a minimum ofchange in pressure or flow of the carrier gas or mobile phase. 3.1 Syringes and Switching Valves- A common method for placing samples on a GC column isto use the microliter syringe with a needle to penetrate aplastic membrane. Syringe injection is a convenient and generally effectivemethod though the thermoplastic septum develops leaks afterrepeated injections. Fatigue of the plastic septum limits thenumber of injections to 30 before the septum must bereplaced.
  8. 8. Gas samples can be injected into the column using gas-tightsyringes or using rotary gas switching valves that offer enormousflexibility for GC instruments. Precision gas switching valves allowa gas sample to be measured with a precise volume andintroduced into carrier gas flow without interrupting column flow.Sample is loaded into a loop and then, with a change in the valveposition, is swept into the column under flow of the gas source.3.2Pyrolysis-inlet option which is now routine in certain specific Anotherapplications of material sciences is that of sample pyrolysis wheresolid samples are rapidly heated to a point of thermal decompositionin a reproducible manner. At temperatures in excess of 600 °C,substances such as natural or synthetic polymers thermallydecompose to small molecular weight, stable substances thatprovide a chromatographic profile which is unique to certainmaterials. Such an injector enlarges the application of GC to solidsamples that would not normally be considered suitable for GCcharacterization, and pyrolysis methods have become standardizedfor some applications such as assaying plastics.
  9. 9. 4 .Ovens : 4.1 Conventional Designs- Liquids or solids must be converted to vapor state and maintained as a vapor throughout the GC separation. Therefore, most gas chromatographs are equipped with ovens to keep the column at temperatures from 40 to 350 c . Conventional ovens, unchanged in decades, consist of a resistive radiates into inner volume of the oven. Heat from the resistive wirewire coil source is spread, ideally in an even manner, throughout the oven volume using a fan attached to an electric motor. A thermistor or thermocouple inside the oven is part of regulating the oven temperature via the amount of heat released by the heating element.4.2 Other Designs for Control of Column Temperature- Several alternatives to conventional ovens have been devised and may be especially helpful for short columns or instances where little space is available for a bulky, heated air oven.
  10. 10. 5. Detectors & Data System 1.FLAME IONIZATION DETECTOR : 2.NITROGEN PHOSPHORUS DETECTOR (NPD): 3. ELECTRON CAPTURE DETECTOR (ECD): 4.THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY DETECTOR : 5.FLAME PHOTOMETRIC DETECTOR (FPD): 6.PHOTOIONIZATION DETECTOR (PID): 7.ELMASS SPECTROMETER (MS): 8.ECTROLYTIC CONDUCTIVITY DETECTOR (ELCD):
  11. 11. 1.FLAME IONIZATION DETECTOR (FID): Mechanism: Compounds are burned in a hydrogen-air flame. Carboncontaining compounds produce ions that are attracted to the collector. Thenumber of ions hitting the collector is measured and a signal is generated. Sensitivity: 0.1-10 ng Linear range: 105-107 Gases: Combustion - hydrogen and air; Makeup - helium or nitrogen Temperature: 250-300°C,and 400-450°C for high temperatureanalyses.
  12. 12. 2.NITROGEN PHOSPHORUS DETECTOR (NPD): Mechanism: Compounds are burned in a plasma surrounding arubidium bead supplied with hydrogen and air. Nitrogen and phosphorouscontaining compounds produce ions that are attracted to the collector. Thenumber of ions hitting the collector is measured and a signal is generated.Selectivity: Nitrogen and phosphorous containing compounds Sensitivity: 1-10 pg Linear range: 104-10-6 Gases: Combustion - hydrogen and air; Makeup - helium Temperature: 250-300°C
  13. 13. 3. ELECTRON CAPTURE DETECTOR (ECD): Mechanism: Electrons are supplied from a 63Ni foil lining the detectorcell. A current is generated in the cell. Electronegative compoundscapture electrons resulting in a reduction in the current. The amount ofcurrent loss is indirectly measured and a signal is generated.Selectivity: Halogens, nitrates and conjugated carbonyls Sensitivity: 0.1-10 pg (halogenated compounds); 1-100 pg (nitrates); 0.1-1 ng (carbonyls) Linear range: 103-104 Gases: Nitrogen or argon/methane Temperature: 300-400°C
  14. 14. 4. PHOTOIONIZATION DETECTOR (PID): Mechanism: Compounds eluting into a cell are bombarded with highenergy photons emitted from a lamp. Compounds with ionizationpotentials below the photon energy are ionized. The resulting ions areattracted to an electrode, measured, and a signal is generated.Selectivity: Depends on lamp energy. Usually used for aromatics andolefins (10 eV lamp). Sensitivity: 25-50 pg (aromatics); 50-200 pg (olefins) Linear range: 105-106 Gases: Makeup - same as the carrier gas Temperature: 200°C

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