Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Initiating Online Communities

1,314 views

Published on

Schaffert, Sandra (2009): Successful Initiating of Online Communities.
An Analysis of Reports, Projects and Expert Interviews. - Presentation at the
I-Know Conference, September 3 2009, Graz, Austria

Published in: Business, Technology
  • Be the first to comment

Initiating Online Communities

  1. 1. Sandra Schaffert, Diana Wieden-Bischof comstudy@newmedialab.at Successful Initiating of Online Communities. An Analysis of Reports, Projects and Expert Interviews. I-Know Conference, September 3 2009, Graz, Austria Gefördert mit Mitteln des BMWA und des Landes Salzburg
  2. 2. A lot of successful projects in the Web are unthinkable with vibrant online communities ... how to initiate such communities?
  3. 3. Seite 3 Why the Salzburg New Media Lab is interested...  Film ausschnitt
  4. 4. Seite 4 Agenda
  5. 5. Seite 5 Agenda  (Our working) definitition of „(online) community“  Methodology  Lifecycle of online communities: existing theories and explanations  General principles of successful initiating of online communities  Six applications areas  Open Innovation
  6. 6. Seite 6 Definitions
  7. 7. Seite 7 What are online communities?  For “community” the geographical proximity and/or familiar relationships play a role [Stocker, 08, 64f]  Several terms: virtual community, online community or Web community
  8. 8. Seite 8 „Virtual Community“ by H. Rheingold “Virtual communities are social aggregations that emerge from the Net when enough people carry on those public discussions long enough, with sufficient human feeling, to form webs of personal relationships in cyberspace.“ [Rheingold, 93]. Source: http://openp2p.com/p2p/2003/04/25/graphics/h_rheingold.jpg
  9. 9. Seite 9 „Online Community“ by P. Sloep
  10. 10. Seite 10 Our (working) definition  A online community are persons with common interests, using Internet and communication technologies to interchange or develop common contents, developing a strong bond and a feeling of togetherness. (p. 12)
  11. 11. Seite 11 Methodology
  12. 12. Seite 12 Source: http://www.fieldstonealliance.org/client/client_images/cartoon-cmty_building.jpg
  13. 13. Seite 13 Basis: Literature and Tipps (in German) (...)
  14. 14. Seite 14 First steps ...  we identified  (i) theories and explanations of the online community’s life cycle,  (ii) categorizations of online communities, and  (iii) recommendations and examples for their successful initiating (...or even research about this) Peak headbanging (gipfelmoshen.de)
  15. 15. Seite 15 ... next steps ...  Still open: What are general aspects and principles?  Selection of six very diverse application areas  online self-help groups or patient groups,  online communities on professional news-sites,  communities of learners,  customer communities for open innovation,  enterprise communities for knowledge management,  communities for open source development.
  16. 16. Seite 16 ...additionally...  We broaden our research for publications, statements, projects and potential interview partners, also to international publications, in the six applications areas. i.e. Prof. Andrea Back
  17. 17. Seite 17 ... finally  Every recommendation was scrutinized if it can serve as general (or as fitting to just one of the application areas)
  18. 18. Seite 18 (background)  our approach builds on the ideas and concept of Grounded Theory, which describes a systematic theory building from data in the process of research [Glaser, 67]
  19. 19. Seite 19 Lifecycle of online communities: existing theories and explanations
  20. 20. Seite 20 Metcalfe‘s law states that the value of a telecommunications network is proportional to the square of the number of connected users of the system (n2 ) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metcalfe%27s_law
  21. 21. Seite 21 Metcalfe‘s law  Source: http://www.spectrum.ieee.org/computing/networks/metcalfes- law-is-wrong
  22. 22. Seite 22 Metcalfe‘s law is wrong (for communication within online communities)  Source: http://www.spectrum.ieee.org/computing/networks/metcalfes- law-is-wrong
  23. 23. Seite 23 Lifecylce of online communities: overview of explanations/theories
  24. 24. Seite 24 General principles of successful initiating of online communities
  25. 25. Seite 25 Initiating online communities: Overview figure 7, p. 26
  26. 26. Seite 26 General Principle: Let it grow!
  27. 27. Seite 27 General Principle: Let it grow!  Communities are organic systems ... as plants
  28. 28. Seite 28 General Principle: Let it grow!  ... You can cultivate them i.e. a certain degree of uncertainness, of momentum.
  29. 29. Seite 29 General Principle: Let it grow! Case Comparison: encyclopaedia projects Nupedia/Wikipedia start: 2001 Website: www.wikipedia.org GNUPedia, later GNE start: 2001 Website: gne.sourceforge.net/eng/ importance:  – one of the most famous Websites, worldwide, also in comparison with traditional encyclopaedias importance:  – comparably unknown
  30. 30. Seite 30 General Principle: Let it grow!  „Let it grow“ means …  (potential) community members should be involved and have to be taken serious  Participation concerning content, organisation, technical aspects  Community‘s activities and goal can be changed – this have to be okay!
  31. 31. Seite 31 Commitment on purpose and goal of the community
  32. 32. Seite 32 Commitment on purpose and goal  Example: MiAdidas
  33. 33. Seite 33 Commitment on purpose and goal  Example: Rett-Forum (seldom illness)
  34. 34. Seite 34 Commitment on purpose and goal  egoistic motives, e.g.  reputation, image  customer relationship  marketing, advertisement  product development  quality assurance  market monitoring  altruistic motives  to bring or develop something a step forward (e.g. politics,science, techonologies)  To help others (e.g. self help groups).
  35. 35. Seite 35 Investigate the needs of the target group
  36. 36. Seite 36 Investigate the needs of the target group  Concerning their motives:  Egoistic motives (reputation, to learn something)  Altruistic motives: to brings something forward, to help  Concerning their needs: layout, content, interests, rituals, technology, design etc.
  37. 37. Seite 37 Investigate the needs of the target group  Research for existing studies and data  Own investigations (single case analysis, group discusions, questionaires...)  Important: involvement of potential community members in an early stage!  Kim (2000): Members are attrachted by a topic, but stay because of the others/relationships
  38. 38. Seite 38 Investigate the needs of the target group … getting involved in a (online) community of pick up artists ...
  39. 39. Seite 39 Foster communication, collaboration and community
  40. 40. Seite 40 Foster communication, collaboration and community  Fostering community according to Kim (2001)  Offer flexible and expandable meeting possibilities  Offer diverse roles  Develop a clear leadership strategy  Foster the development of a (n)etiquette  Regularly events  Develop rituals  Support sub group establishment
  41. 41. Seite 41 Foster communication, collaboration and community  Compelling profiles
  42. 42. Seite 42 Evaluation and measurement of success
  43. 43. Seite 43 Evaluation and Measurement of Success  Not simple – because of two possible perspectives  of the community  or of the initiators/ providers?
  44. 44. Seite 44 Evaluation and Measurement of Success  Assessing the healthiness of a community (Spreadloveproject 2008)  the average length of time it takes for a newbie to become a regular contributor  community participation in gardening, policing and keeping the community a nicer place (eg. people who click on the 'report this as spam', people who edit the wiki for better layout, etc.)  Member engagement: activity and "investment" in community  Member Loyalty & Satisfaction  Mobile interactions with the community: including views and posts from mobiles.  ratio of posts with no response to posts with response  http://spreadloveproject.pbworks.com/CommunityMeasurements
  45. 45. Seite 45 Six Application Areas
  46. 46. Seite 46 Six application areas of online communities  online self-help groups or patient groups,  online communities on professional news-sites,  communities of learners,  customer communities for open innovation,  enterprise communities for knowledge management, and  communities for open source development.
  47. 47. Seite 47 (just one application area)... Open Innovation
  48. 48. Seite 48 Open Innovation  Initalisation of a communty of customers to involve them in innovation processes  Examples: Swarowski, Acecook, MiAdidas
  49. 49. Seite 49 Dr. Peter Gloor (MIT) about Open Innovation  A clear answer of „What is in it for me?“ should be given (from users‘ perspective)  Fitting persons for advertisment are needed e.g. Bono für Motorola  The product have to be „cool“ (for the community)  No aggressive sale of products
  50. 50. Seite 50 Dr. Mark Markus (SRFG) about Open Innovation  Customers should have the idea to make a contribution to a „common good“, that a product value will be developed and that they can get reputation  Involvement of friendly user, without payment but with attractive special offers as tests, exclusive products  Generally: other methods are eventually more goal orientated.
  51. 51. Seite 51 Summary obstacles and stumbling blocks research and acquisition of lead users is important it could be problematic if the public and competitors are able to follow the community’s activity Successful measures established instruments of innovation measures, e.g. idea competitions a member only community special offers (costs, events, test usage, exclusive content) (Schaffert & Wieden-Bischof 2009, table 5, p. 68)
  52. 52. Seite 52 Outlook
  53. 53. Seite 53 Open questions ..  this study was about the first phase of community building (initialising)  ... there is still a lack of more research and (meta) analysis of recommendations for community management.
  54. 54. Seite 54 Next steps within the project „ComStudy“  ComStudy is a project of the SNML (10/2008- 12/2009) about vibrant online communities  3 additional studies will be published: overview, good practice and recommendations concerning  (meta) informationen (11/2009)  recommender systems (11/2009)  reputation and engagement systems (12/2009)
  55. 55. Seite 55 More ...
  56. 56. Seite 56 More about this:  Full Study, in German: Sandra Schaffert & Diana Wieden-Bischof (2009). Erfolgreicher Aufbau von Online-Communitys. Konzepte, Szenarien und Handlungsempfehlungen. Band 1 der Reihe „Social Media“ (hrsg. von Georg Güntner & Sebastian Schaffert)  Video, in German: http://www.vimeo.com/4291468  English Summary: Sandra Schaffert & Diana Wieden-Bischof (2009). Successful Initiating of Online Communities. An Analysis of Reports, Projects and Expert Interviews. In: I- Know Proceedings.
  57. 57. Seite 57 Salzburg NewMediaLab  Website  www.newmedialab.at  pp.newmedialab.at  Contact  Dr. Sandra Schaffert Salzburg Research Jakob Haringer Straße 5/III sandra.schaffert@salzburgresearch.at
  58. 58. Seite 58 References ... (within this presentation...)
  59. 59. Seite 59 References  Glaser, B. and Strauss, A. (1967). The discovery of grounded theory. Chicago: Aldine.  Kim, Amy Jo (2001). Community Building – Strategien für den Aufbau erfolgreicher Web-Communities. Bonn: Galileo Press.  Rheingold, Howard (1993). The Virtual Community. Homesteading on the Electronic Frontier. New York: Addison-Wesley. Online zugänglich unter: http://www.rheingold.com/vc/book/index.html [2008-10-16]  Schaffert, S. & Wieden-Bischof, W. (2009). Erfolgreicher Aufbau von Online-Communitys. Konzepte, Szenarien und Handlungsempfehlungen. Salzburg.  Spreadloveproject (2008). Community Measurements (Wikipage, unter anderem unter der Mitwirkung von DavidCary, NurtureGirl und TaraHunt erstellt). URLr: http://spreadloveproject.pbwiki.com/CommunityMeasurements

×