QR Codes: tagging for learning performance

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QR Codes: tagging for learning performance

Presentation at ICL 2009 in Villach, Austria 24 September 2009

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  • John Sandler, ICEL 2009, Villach, September 2009
  • John Sandler, ICEL 2009, Villach, September 2009 For elearning solutions, whatever their final format, to be successful, they must enable users and learners to achieve their learning goal or goals. The goals might be finding specific workplace related information, or assistance in completing various tasks in their workplace - what the user is trying to achieve. In order to achieve these goals, the eLearning materials that will be designed to support the web site, application, product or processes have to be easy to use.
  • John Sandler, ICEL 2009, Villach, September 2009
  • John Sandler, ICEL 2009, Villach, September 2009
  • John Sandler, ICEL 2009, Villach, September 2009
  • John Sandler, ICEL 2009, Villach, September 2009
  • John Sandler, ICEL 2009, Villach, September 2009 The target audience and their characteristics and preferences need to be defined. Depending on the nature and size of the project, available resources and the time available, this activity could be carried out as part of the earlier information gathering, or separately. This is done by User Profiling. A User Profile is a description of a user type, characterized by any number of attributes. These attributes could range from the user’s demographics, to their technological expertise, to their interests. The benefit of a User Profile lies in its ability to segment and categorize the user audience.
  • John Sandler, ICEL 2009, Villach, September 2009 The target audience and their characteristics and preferences need to be defined. Depending on the nature and size of the project, available resources and the time available, this activity could be carried out as part of the earlier information gathering, or separately. This is done by User Profiling. A User Profile is a description of a user type, characterized by any number of attributes. These attributes could range from the user’s demographics, to their technological expertise, to their interests. The benefit of a User Profile lies in its ability to segment and categorize the user audience.
  • John Sandler, ICEL 2009, Villach, September 2009 An important part of determining content is to gather as much information as possible that is relevant to the eLearn modules proposed for development. This is accomplished through a variety of processes, including: Researching the organisation’s knowledge base/archive system Interviews, consultation and observation with stakeholders and learners will assist in understanding the project mission, goals and background. Questions should be framed to obtain an understanding of the learners (users) and their workplace activities and needs. Observations and consultations with key users, stakeholders and project leaders. A number of tools can be used to gather more information about users and their goals. Survey techniques can be used for gathering information from a large number of users. Questionnaires are a major information gathering tool used in surveys. Questionnaires can be email-based, Web-based, or paper-based, depending on the desired sample size as well as technical and time constraints. Before starting the survey activity, you need to set the parameters. Once the content and workflow information has been gathered, and tasks and performance needs assessed, a Learning Module outline, or similar script is created. This document, together with the initial Content document, is presented to the users/stakeholders as the basis for the eLearning development. This will eventually be signed off, perhaps with updates and enhancements.
  • John Sandler, ICEL 2009, Villach, September 2009 Build typical scenarios of use for the eLearning materials, based upon the profiling information, that create compelling stories that will assist in understanding user behaviors. Scenarios assist in understanding tasks and issues from a user perspective. A User Scenario is a realistic description or narrative about how a user may interact with a system, application, process or product in the workplace. Each scenario should describe a user, a setting, a workplace situation a sequence of steps forming an interaction. User Scenarios can be used to explore and communicate the likely actions of users when interacting with the eLearning materials. Development of User Scenarios helps the design team understand the motivations of users and the functions that will compliment their motivations. User Scenarios can suggest new functional requirements. A User Scenario tells a story about how a user will interact with the eLearning materials in the workplace or learning environment. This narrative description should include information about the user, a history of the situation, and written descriptions. User Scenarios can be illustrated to enhance the effectiveness of the story. A set of User Scenarios can be created to describe the majority of user interactions with the eLearning materials. User Scenarios are excellent tools for client communication since they are usually very easy for the client to understand. Typically, these scenarios represent positive aspects of the eLearning materials as it is desired, but they can be used to illustrate negative aspects of the eLearning materials in order to confirm requirements that may place severe restrictions on the application. When testing of the application begins, the User Scenarios can provide valuable input into the test plan, illustrating the way that the application is supposed to work from the users’ perspective.
  • John Sandler, ICEL 2009, Villach, September 2009
  • John Sandler, ICEL 2009, Villach, September 2009
  • John Sandler, ICEL 2009, Villach, September 2009
  • QR Codes: tagging for learning performance

    1. 1. B QR Codes: tagging for learning performance
    2. 2. WHAT ARE QR CODES? <ul><li>QR Codes are matrix codes (or 2-D bar codes) </li></ul><ul><li>Contain alphanumeric text </li></ul><ul><li>Physical hyperlink. </li></ul><ul><li>Navigate via mobile </li></ul><ul><li>Mobile tagging </li></ul>
    3. 3. HOW DOES IT WORK? - basics <ul><li>Mobile phone with QR reader </li></ul><ul><li>Point & scan code </li></ul><ul><li>Software interprets code </li></ul><ul><li>Permission to launch a browser </li></ul>
    4. 4. HOW DOES IT WORK? – the flow <ul><li>Mobile phone with QR reader </li></ul><ul><li>Code to scan </li></ul><ul><li>Scan </li></ul><ul><li>Site </li></ul>
    5. 5. <ul><li>Link physical with the virtual </li></ul><ul><li>Museum </li></ul><ul><li>Lecture links </li></ul><ul><li>User guides </li></ul><ul><li>Administration </li></ul><ul><li>Scientific equipment labels </li></ul><ul><li>Bibliography </li></ul><ul><li>Campus induction </li></ul>IMPLICATIONS FOR EDUCATION
    6. 6. <ul><li>Link physical with the virtual </li></ul><ul><li>Submit surveys/feedback </li></ul><ul><li>Post assignments </li></ul><ul><li>Library </li></ul><ul><li>Outdoor activities </li></ul><ul><li>Web login </li></ul><ul><li>Video links </li></ul><ul><li>Educational links </li></ul>IMPLICATIONS FOR EDUCATION
    7. 7. QR CODES IN COMMERCE <ul><li>Campaigns </li></ul><ul><li>Events </li></ul><ul><li>Buildings & Billboards </li></ul><ul><li>Real Estate </li></ul><ul><li>Travel </li></ul><ul><li>Payments </li></ul>
    8. 8. CITY SCAPE <ul><li>Billboards </li></ul><ul><li>Urban </li></ul>
    9. 9. QR CODES REPORTING <ul><li>Analytic applications enable: </li></ul><ul><li>Evaluation of QR campaigns </li></ul><ul><li>Metrics </li></ul><ul><li>Frequency of scans </li></ul><ul><li>Locations </li></ul><ul><li>Segment </li></ul><ul><li>Media </li></ul>
    10. 10. DOWNSIDE <ul><li>Not everyone has a camera mobile </li></ul><ul><li>With QR reader </li></ul><ul><li>Compatibility wide range QR codes </li></ul>
    11. 11. SUMMARY <ul><li>Ideal for real world </li></ul><ul><li>Dynamic reactions </li></ul><ul><li>Rapid access to information </li></ul><ul><li>Mobile - learning device of 21 st century </li></ul>
    12. 12. REFERENCES <ul><li>QR Code. (2009, March). Retrieved April 2009, from Wikipedia: http://www.en.wikipedia.org/wiki/QR_Code </li></ul><ul><li>7 things you should know about...QR Codes. (2009, February). Retrieved May 2009, from ELI: http://educause.edu/eli </li></ul><ul><li>Ramsden, Andy: Exploring the use of QR Codes as a Learning Technology, Plymouth e-learning Conference, England, 23rd April 2009. </li></ul><ul><li>Chan, S. (2009, March). Fresh + new(er). Retrieved April 2009, from Powerhouse Museum: http://powerhousmuseum/dmsblog/index.php/2009/03/05/qr-codes-in-themuseum </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.qrme.co.uk/qr-code-news.html </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.telstra.com.au/codes/index.cfm </li></ul><ul><li>CONTACT </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>@greyrab (Twitter) </li></ul><ul><li>nohow.wordpress.com (blog) </li></ul>
    13. 13. THANKS

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