Orbit ip business intelligence & a case on entertainment industry july 2013

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Orbit ip business intelligence & a case on entertainment industry july 2013

  1. 1. V130716 Patentopolis White Paper 2 Industry report: case of the entertainment industry Patentopolis releases a series of White Papers which aim to help solve, thanks to IP business intelligence, challenges that many companies and organizations face in various industries. • How to understand industry changes and be better prepared to new competition • How to identify and initiate mergers and acquisition at an early stage. • How to mine company innovation portfolios and to choose the most adequate IP strategy Contents of the present White Paper Objectives of this White Paper ...........................................................................................2 Summary: insights in 3 independent sectors of the entertainment industry...........................2 Entertainment industry: background information.................................................................3 Film sector: Disney strengthens its technology position in animated movies..........................3 Music sector: Dolby Laboratories, 40 years of success with patent licensing..........................8 Television sector: the growth of the “Pay TV” business in Asia........................................... 13 Generalized benefits for your daily practice....................................................................... 18 How to get started in IP business intelligence: a methodology using Orbit® ........................ 19 List of figures in this White Paper..................................................................................... 22 Notes and references ...................................................................................................... 23 This paper has been prepared using the patent data and analytics of Orbit® from Questel Disclaimer Patentopolis BV is specialized in IP business intelligence. We do not provide legal or other professional advice; we make no representation or warranty of any kind including warranties of fitness for a particular purpose, satisfactory quality, accuracy, non-infringement, nor are any such warranties to be implied with respect to any products and services. The present paper is provided “as is”. It does not form any legal or other professional advice. It does not constitute an opinion as to novelty, patentability or freedom-to-operate. For more details, please do not hesitate to contact us at info@patentopolis.com
  2. 2. Patentopolis White Paper 2 Understanding Industry Change Case of the entertainment industry © 2013 Patentopolis BV Page 2 Objectives of this White Paper This paper aims to provide insights on last years’ changes occurred in the entertainment industry, over three business sectors (film, music, television). More specifically, it demonstrates the following. • How to identify leaders in this industry and better understand leadership • How to monitor their trends (technology, competition, market) • How to read recent changes and translate these into threats and opportunities Summary: insights in 3 independent sectors of the entertainment industry Film sector: case of Disney • Disney’s core business has been protected: theme parks, ride vehicle, pyrotechnic, animation movies… • Role and complementary technology (computer animation) of Pixar within Disney’s portfolio, in terms of businesses and proprietary knowledge. • Cooperation network and alliances between Disney and universities e.g. ETH Zurich in the areas of reconstruction of hair and skin and physical face cloning Music sector: case of Dolby • 40 years of patenting (and licensing), with a particularly steep growth since 2005 (year when Dolby became a publicly registered company). Also reflecting acquisition e.g. of Coding Technologies in 2007 • One of the main clusters of Dolby’s portfolio is audio coding/compression • Such cluster is also the object of the licensing program AAC available from “Via Licensing”, a wholly subsidiary of Dolby, which administer such programs on behalf of third-parties (e.g. AT&T, Philips, Microsoft, NEC, Nokia, Panasonic, Sony…) Television sector: case of Pay-TV • Global Pay-TV market revenues forecasted to grow from US$12 billion in 2009 to US$38 billion in 2013. This growing market is reflecting through patenting growth strategy starting in 2000, possibly associated with the emergence of new technologies (mobile, online) mainly from the USA and subsequently in Korea and Japan; • A second (patenting) growth since 2007 due to new entrants in this industry, mainly from China. Among the most active Chinese companies are: Huawei (one of the largest telecommunication equipment makers in the world since 2012) and ZTE (mobile phone manufacturer). • New entrants’ portfolios are very young yet robust while those of the more traditional players tend to be more mature
  3. 3. Patentopolis White Paper 2 Understanding Industry Change Case of the entertainment industry © 2013 Patentopolis BV Page 3 Entertainment industry: background information Traditionally in the entertainment industry, copyright has been one of the main mechanisms to protect the original works made in films, music and other media content. Still today, copyright protection remains an important means to leverage value and sustain the business model for authors and entertainment companies in order to be compensated. On 7 March 2013, the Court of Justice of the European Union ruled in ITV Broadcasting Ltd and others vs. TV Catchup Ltd that live internet streaming of terrestrial TV broadcasts constitutes a “communication to the public” within the meaning of Article 3(1) of the Copyright Directive. Without broadcaster permission, such retransmission may infringe broadcast copyright.1 This European-wide court decision is clearly favorable to IP rights holders and reinforces their position in the currently disputed business model of copyright owners’ compensation. At the same time, like in many other fields, technology has been increasingly intertwined with this industry over the last decade. Talent is no longer the only ingredient of success. For instance, did you know that Stephen Spielberg patented a method for annotating digital scripts with voice (US2005244804)? This White Paper explores recent trends in the entertainment industry in relation to movies, sound and online content delivery. More specifically, Section 1 highlights the long-lasting history of the company Disney especially with regards to animated movies. Section 2 relates to an IP-savvy company from its inception in the 1960’s, Dolby Laboratories, active in the area of sound systems e.g. for movies theaters among others. Finally, Section 3 provides insights in the area of online content/media delivery, in particular Pay TV (internet TV). In this context, what is the current patenting strategy of traditional players like Disney and Dolby? Who is actually active in blooming industries such as Pay TV? What are the technology trends? How can traditional players prepare in order to face this changing landscape? Which networks, cooperations and alliances have appeared to strengthen leadership in this diverse entertainment industry? Film sector: Disney strengthens its technology position in animated movies Disney, heavily based on the merchandising of IP (copyrights, brands), grew from a US$ 2 billion company to a US$ 22 billion empire within 10 years, through merchandizing of its copyrighted characters. 2 3 Technology has been playing a growing role in the entertainment industry. Disney, like other players in the field, also relies on technology and therefore has been active with patenting. This trend is clearly seen in the area of animated movies. Disney has a long history in animated films starting with Snow White in the 1930’s. Traditionally, these films were created using the time-consuming and labor-intensive process of 2-dimensional, hand-drawn cell animation. However, times changed and technology changes as well. Figure 1 below shows clusters of innovation areas of Disney’s patent portfolio over time. Here, the main innovation areas correspond to different technology clusters market segments (animation movies, theme parks…) and corresponding technologies (animation techniques, ride vehicle, pyrotechnic…).
  4. 4. Patentopolis White Paper 2 Understanding Industry Change Case of the entertainment industry © 2013 Patentopolis BV Page 4 Figure 1: clustering Disney patent portfolio (here, circular tree-map) Source Orbit® from Questel Figure 2: first text-mining (word cloud) Source Orbit® from Questel Pixar is another company very active in the area of animation movies over the last 25 years. In particular, Pixar has conceived and developed innovations based on computer animation, especially at a time when Disney’s techniques were more traditional. In other words, Pixar and Disney are complementary in terms of businesses and proprietary knowledge. Not surprisingly then that, Disney acquired Pixar in 2006. 4 Patent-wise both Pixar and Disney started patenting in the late 1990’s. Figure 3 below shows the innovation pace (here defined in terms of total number of patent families 5 published per year) based on a patent search as explained in page 19.
  5. 5. Patentopolis White Paper 2 Understanding Industry Change Case of the entertainment industry © 2013 Patentopolis BV Page 5 Figure 3: Innovation pace in the Disney patent portfolio including and highlighting Pixar therein Source Orbit® from Questel The role and complementary technology of Pixar within Disney’s portfolio can be confirmed as shown in Figure 4 below (same representation of Disney’s portfolio as in
  6. 6. Patentopolis White Paper 2 Understanding Industry Change Case of the entertainment industry © 2013 Patentopolis BV Page 6 Figure 1 above, but this time highlighting Pixar). As shown below, Pixar contributions in the technological leadership of Disney prevails in the area of animation techniques and related innovations. Figure 4: emphasizing Pixar complementarity to Disney (circular tree-map) Source Orbit® from Questel Internal R&D and business acquisitions are not the only strategies used by Disney to keep momentum over the competition. Disney has also drawn a cooperation network and alliances with third parties, including universities and other academic actors. These links can be identified through co-ownership of patents co-developed and/or co-financed by Disney, Pixar and such third parties. Figure 5 below partly shows the Disney network. Figure 5: Disney network (using co-ownership graph) – excerpt Source Orbit® from Questel As shown above, Disney has established a relationship with the Swiss university ETH Zurich. ETH Zurich’s role within Disney portfolio can be confirmed as shown in Figure 6 below (same
  7. 7. Patentopolis White Paper 2 Understanding Industry Change Case of the entertainment industry © 2013 Patentopolis BV Page 7 representation of Disney’s portfolio as in Figure 3 above, but this time highlighting the Swiss university). Figure 6: Innovation pace in the Disney patent portfolio and highlighting the part of ETH Zurich therein Source Orbit® from Questel As shown above, this cooperation between Disney and ETH Zurich is rather recent albeit intensive. In fact, almost 20 patent families have been published in the name of both Disney and the Swiss university over the last 2 years. More specifically, Disney and ETH Zurich have jointly worked on computer-implemented methods for reconstruction of hair and skin (see e.g. US20120313937) and physical face cloning to generate a synthetic skin (see e. US20120185218). Source: US20120313937, Orbit® from Questel
  8. 8. Patentopolis White Paper 2 Understanding Industry Change Case of the entertainment industry © 2013 Patentopolis BV Page 8 Source: US20120313937, Orbit® from Questel Music sector: Dolby Laboratories, 40 years of success with patent licensing Since the 1960s, Dolby Laboratories has been a leader in audio innovation. Dolby Labs was founded by Ray Dolby in 1965. His first product aimed to reduce noise by treating only the quiet sounds that would be masked by tape noise. Dolby marketed the product to record companies. Dolby also sought to improve film sound. He developed a digital surround sound system for movie industry. In 2010 Dolby Surround 7.1 was introduced and movies theaters were set up worldwide with Surround 7.1 speaker setups. The first film released with this format was Toy Story 3 by Pixar (!). Analyzing the innovation pace of a company, although simple at first sight, also reveals information about the company’s history and the lifecycle the company is currently facing. Figure 7 below shows Dolby’s innovation pace since its inception (here defined in terms of total number of patent families published per year, as defined in endnote 5) based on a patent search as explained in page 19. Figure 7: Innovation pace in the Dolby patent portfolio including and highlighting the importance of coding technologies therein
  9. 9. Patentopolis White Paper 2 Understanding Industry Change Case of the entertainment industry © 2013 Patentopolis BV Page 9 Source Orbit® from Questel As shown above, Dolby patenting activity has been particularly steep since 2005. This increase can be explained by the fact that: • Dolby became a public registered company in February 2005, as since patent protection is generally reassures investors as a mean to demonstrate the company’s technological leadership in its field of activity. • Dolby acquired e.g. Coding Technologies in November 2007 to broaden Dolby's technological portfolio in the digital broadcast, mobile, and internet markets. Interestingly, the number of patent families in the name of Coding Technology has remained high since the 2007 acquisition by Dolby. Dolby did not only establish technology leadership through extensive internal R&D and business acquisitions. In fact, Dolby has also actively commercialized its innovations from its inception, especially through extensive licensing programs which representing the main stream income for the whole company. For instance, Dolby in 2007 made $387,117,000 in revenues from licensing. Such revenues from licensing represented 75% of Dolby revenue in 2011. 6 To this end, “Via Licensing”, a wholly owned subsidiary of Dolby, has been established. Via Licensing has more than 40 years of technology licensing experience in the audio, broadcast, wireless, and automotive markets. Its mission consists in administering licensing programs on behalf of third-party companies and organizations such as: AT&T, Dolby, France Telecom, Fraunhofer, Philips, LG Electronics, Microsoft, NEC, Nokia, Panasonic, Sony, etc. 7 Which technologies have been licensed through the company Via Licensing? One of the licensing programs available through Via Licensing is Advanced Audio Coding (AAC). AAC is an audio compression scheme first standardized within MPEG in 1997. AAC was designed to provide high quality audio. 8
  10. 10. Patentopolis White Paper 2 Understanding Industry Change Case of the entertainment industry © 2013 Patentopolis BV Page 10 Source: Via Licensing In fact, audio coding technologies are a main part of Dolby patent portfolio. This role can be observed through a technology code ranking of Dolby technologies, using the globally used patent classifications like the International Patent Classification (IPC or CIB). Figure 8 below shows a top ranking cumulated over the whole period (i.e. since Dolby’s inception in 1960’s) and Figure 9 below shows the innovation trends since Dolby became public in 2005. Figure 8: top IPC/CIB codes ranking 9 Source Orbit® from Questel Figure 9: Innovation trends of Dolby portfolio since 2005
  11. 11. Patentopolis White Paper 2 Understanding Industry Change Case of the entertainment industry © 2013 Patentopolis BV Page 11 Source Orbit® from Questel Where: CIB Codes Short descriptions G10L 19/00 (19/02) Coding or decoding of speech or audio signal (using spectral analysis) H04N 7/26 Television signal transmission with (de)coding of digital video signal H04S 3/00 Stereophonic sound systems e.g. quadraphonic ones H03M 7/30 Coding/decoding, code conversion: compression As shown above, the top technologies of Dolby and its latest trends are directed toward • Audio encoding/compression, i.e. the object of the licensing program AAC (see above) • Analog audio noise reduction • Audio processing, Video processing Television signal processing (H04N 7/26 above) seems to be an area of growing interest. This could be partly explained with the increasing role of internet TV (see below). Finally, third parties e.g. potential licensing partners can be identified by carrying out a citation analysis of Dolby patented technologies. Although the relevance of such analysis is regularly questioned, it is to possible to limit such analysis to the most relevant ones, i.e. the so-called “X citations” (those which are cited by patent examiners in relation to the novelty in the official search reports). Here, almost 800 patent families have been identified which have been subsequently cleaned up (especially the name of the assignees). Figure 10 below shows the trends of companies developing subsequent technologies based on the Dolby portfolio. Figure 10: X Citation trend based on Dolby portfolio
  12. 12. Patentopolis White Paper 2 Understanding Industry Change Case of the entertainment industry © 2013 Patentopolis BV Page 12 Source Orbit® from Questel Not surprisingly, companies and organizations like Fraunhoffer, LG electronics and Philips have been very active. These companies are also those which are licensors, together with Dolby, of e.g. ACC licensing program offered by Via Licensing as shown below. Source: Via Licensing
  13. 13. Patentopolis White Paper 2 Understanding Industry Change Case of the entertainment industry © 2013 Patentopolis BV Page 13 Television sector: the growth of the “Pay TV” business in Asia As mentioned earlier, there is an increasing amount of patent activity related to television systems using recent/new broadcasting technological solutions like internet and mobile phones. See above discussion in relation to Figure 9. “Pay TV” is also commonly called “Internet Protocol television” or IPTV. Pay TV is a system through which television services are delivered through the Internet, instead of being delivered through traditional terrestrial, satellite signal or cable television formats. Pay TV Typically means a suite of services delivered through the Internet, including e.g. the following. • Live television, with or without interactivity related to the current TV show; • Time-shifted television: catch-up TV (replays a TV show that was broadcast hours or days ago), start-over TV (replays the current TV show from its beginning); and • Video On Demand (VOD): browse a catalog of videos, not related to TV programming. An important component Pay TV is the so-called “set-top box” located at a subscriber’s home. The device is connected to a television decoding and decrypting TV and VOD content and displaying it on the TV screen. Over the last years the set-top box technology lies within a typical area of technology growth followed by market expansion (new entrants). Figure 11 below shows the innovation pace over the last 20 years (here defined in terms of total number of patent families published per year, as defined in endnote 5) based on a patent search as explained in page 19. Figure 11: Innovation pace of set-top boxes for Pay TV (set-top boxes) Source Orbit® from Questel As shown above, the growing pace of the set-top box technology reflects different phases. • First, a rather limited activity until end of the 1990’s • Followed with a first growth during the period 2000-2006, possibly associated with the emergence of new technologies (mobile, online) • Currently, and since 2007 a second growth phase is taking place associated to new entrants in this industry Where does the new competition come from?
  14. 14. Patentopolis White Paper 2 Understanding Industry Change Case of the entertainment industry © 2013 Patentopolis BV Page 14 One way to identify where new entrants are coming is to analyze the trend in the patent activity from the perspective of the country of origin (i.e. from which countries the patented innovations originate). Figure 12 below shows such trends (through such “priority countries” in the patent jargon). Figure 12: Trends in Pay TV business (set-top boxes) Source Orbit® from Questel As shown above, the first innovation stream came from the US, followed with Korea and Japan. Since mid-2000s a new stream of innovation comes from China, which representation new competition for the traditional players. Leadership and new entrants Who are the companies behind this new competition? Who are the traditional leaders? Figure 13 below shows the competition landscape in the field of set-top boxes for Pay TV. More specifically, it shows the top 10 most active patenting companies in the years 2002- 2012 Figure 13: Top 10 most active companies in Pay TV (set-top boxes) – trends 2002-2012
  15. 15. Patentopolis White Paper 2 Understanding Industry Change Case of the entertainment industry © 2013 Patentopolis BV Page 15 Source Orbit® from Questel As shown above, ZTE and Huawei are ones of the most active Chinese companies, with a significant patent growth rate since the mid-2000. Huawei Technologies is a Chinese multinational networking and telecommunications equipment and services company. It is the largest telecommunications equipment maker in the world, having overtaken Ericsson in 2012. ZTE is another Chinese multinational telecommunications equipment and systems company; it is the world's fourth-largest mobile phone manufacturer measured in 2012 unit sales and the world's fifth-largest telecoms equipment maker measured by 2011 revenues (after Ericsson, Huawei, Alcatel-Lucent and Nokia Siemens Networks).10 Other Asian companies (e.g. Sony from Japan and Samsung from Korea) are also present in the top 10 rankings. What is the portfolio maturity of the most (recently) active companies? What is the risk for the future? Figure 14 shows the portfolio maturity of the top 10 companies listed in Figure 13 above; such maturity is represented by “legal status” and “legal state” 11 of their respective portfolios. Figure 14: Top 10 most active companies in Pay TV (set-top boxes) – portfolio maturity Source Orbit® from Questel ZTE has a young yet robust portfolio, while Microsoft portfolio is more mature. Other companies and organizations, e.g. Konka and Korea Telecom (not shown above) have a very young less established portfolio (where the part of pending applications is far more important than the party of granted patents). Markets The global IPTV market revenues are forecasted to grow from US$12 billion in 2009 to US$38 billion in 2013. North America generates one of the largest shares of this global revenue.
  16. 16. Patentopolis White Paper 2 Understanding Industry Change Case of the entertainment industry © 2013 Patentopolis BV Page 16 China and India markets are still growing due to very low average revenue per user. However, the fastest growing (and ultimately, the biggest markets) is Asia. 12 What is the patenting strategy (in terms of geographical scope) of the new actors? Are the traditional players aligned with the new aggressive approach? The markets sizes indicated above are reflected through the patenting strategies implemented by the companies innovating in this field. Figure 15 below shows the top 10 most protected markets in the world, based on the total patenting activity in terms of “publication country” in relation to Pay TV (set-top boxes). Figure 15: global patenting activity – top 10 protected markets (period 1992-2013) Source Orbit® from Questel As shown above, the top 10 most patented markets are by order of importance: USA, China, Korea, Japan, Australia, Canada, Taiwan, Germany, and India. In other words, the prevalent markets are Asia (49%) and North America (43%). Although new competition from China is very recent over the last 5-7 years, it is already the second most protected market, which shows that companies consider that Chinese consumers are the future promise for Pay TV. In that landscape, Europe is lagging behind momentum; Germany is the only European market present among the top 10 (but with only 3% ...).
  17. 17. Patentopolis White Paper 2 Understanding Industry Change Case of the entertainment industry © 2013 Patentopolis BV Page 17 The above patenting strategy is fully aligned with the current market sizes, as well as the forecast in terms of growth potential, which predicts that Asia will represent the largest growth rate, based on the promise that the average revenue per user will grow together with the rest of the macroeconomic indicators in these countries. Technology segmentation What are the current R&D trends? What have the hot topics been during the last couple of years? Figure 16 below gives another representation of innovation clusters in a landscape format. It shows that the core technology is commonly used for the set-top boxes, related technologies needed for Pay TV (in terms of products and content delivery), and peripheral activities (e.g. services delivered together with content). In the figure below, the positions of a few representative companies have been highlighted: color indicates companies’ country origin (China in red, USA in blue and Korea in Yellow). Figure 16: third level text-mining (landscape) Source Orbit® from Questel As shown above, the presence of Chinese companies prevails; they tend to be present throughout the technology landscape as well as in the area of service provider AT&T tends to be focussing in areas such as video gaming, news and television portal.
  18. 18. Patentopolis White Paper 2 Understanding Industry Change Case of the entertainment industry © 2013 Patentopolis BV Page 18 Generalized benefits for your daily practice IP business intelligence provides insights for innovation management and market positioning. Some may critically consider that such insights have intrinsic pitfalls. • Incomplete data since not all innovations are patented • Not current information due to the 18-month delay between filing and publication; • Difficult to interpret since not all patent filings are made for the same reasons (strategic, opportunistic, shotgun approach…); and that not all patents have the same strength or value Despite the above, patent information remains a powerful, straightforward approach. • Objective (reviewed by patent examiners) • Alive (published every week, all over the world) • Cost-effective (e.g. compared to market reports) When cautiously handled e.g. by crossing with other sources (scientific literature, company information…), IP business intelligence can bring, as shown in this paper, direct valuable insights which can help you understand: • Change in your industry, initiated by technology push (internet, e-commerce) • Change of leadership coming from new players of other industries • How to adapt your company’s strategy, and the role of IP therein, to face new challenges Orbit® enables users with unique and distinctive functionalities. • Elaborate complex searches with great diversity of unique operators • Quickly find terms used in the field, even for non-experts, with similar patent searches • Analyze and archiving large datasets with a comprehensive suite of analytics • Set up alerts to remain aware of the latest trends • Organize search results and data thanks to clustering and thesaurus, which users can build for one or subsequent searches • Share results and improve reporting internally
  19. 19. Patentopolis White Paper 2 Understanding Industry Change Case of the entertainment industry © 2013 Patentopolis BV Page 19 How to get started in IP business intelligence: a methodology using Orbit® The search methodologies behind the present paper are based on the following approaches. 1. Section on Disney Company portfolio search has been carried out using Corporate Tree wizard of Orbit® Figure 17: Corporate tree (example of Disney) Source Orbit® from Questel This functionality of Orbit® helps to quickly retrieve the portfolio of a group, including all patents published in the name of any subsidiaries and affiliates. Automatically, Orbit® then translates the selection of companies of the group into a search string. (DISNEY 1D ENTERPRISES) OR (WALT 1D DISNEY) OR ABC OR (ONE 1D TRUE 1D MEDIA) OR (AMERICAN 1D BROADCASTING 1D COMPANIES) OR (IMAGEMOVERS 1D DIGITAL) OR PIXAR OR (MARVEL 1D ENTERTAINMENT) OR (MARVEL 1D CHARACTERS) OR (MARVEL 1D TOYS) OR INFOSEEK OR STARWAVE OR (WALT 1D DISNEY 1D IMAGINEERING) OR (WALT 1D DISNEY 1D WORLD) OR PLAYDOM OR METAPLACE Finally, the company names have been filtered and reformatted in order to bring forward the relevant activities. Using Orbit® data rules, a series of companies, their name variations and affiliates has been used to optimize the final dataset; some have been grouped and renamed (shown in bold below) and others have been deleted (not shown).
  20. 20. Patentopolis White Paper 2 Understanding Industry Change Case of the entertainment industry © 2013 Patentopolis BV Page 20 Figure 18: company thesaurus building using “data rules administration” in Orbit® - excerpt a Source Orbit® from Questel 2. Section on Dolby Just like for Disney, a company portfolio search has been carried out using the Corporate Tree wizard of Orbit® but this time in respect of the company Dolby. This functionality of Orbit® helps to quickly retrieve the portfolio of a group, including all patents published in the name of any subsidiaries and affiliates. Automatically, Orbit® then translates the selection of companies of the group into a search string. (DOLBY 1D LAB 1D LICENSING) OR (VIA 1D LICENSING) OR DOLBY OR (LAKE 1D TECHNOLOGY) OR CINEA OR (DOLBY 1D LABORATORIES) OR (STEP 1D LABS) OR SYBERSAY 3. Section on Pay TV This field has been translated into technological concepts including: Internet Protocol (IP) TV, set-top boxes. In turn the above concepts have been translated into patent search strategies. 13 iptv or ( (IP or Internet+) 1d (broadcast+ or multicast+ or (multi 1d cast+) or TV+ or televis+)) or ((repurpos+ or (re 1d purpos+) or settop+ or (set 1d top)) 1d (box or unit)) An advantage of using Orbit® is the possibility to search against various text fields as show below Figure 19: Keyword-based search options in Orbit® a
  21. 21. Patentopolis White Paper 2 Understanding Industry Change Case of the entertainment industry © 2013 Patentopolis BV Page 21 Source Orbit® from Questel Another advantage of using Orbit® is the “similarity search” which enables users to enlarge their search analysis results. Figure 20: “Similarity search” option in Orbit® a Source Orbit® from Questel
  22. 22. Patentopolis White Paper 2 Understanding Industry Change Case of the entertainment industry © 2013 Patentopolis BV Page 22 List of figures in this White Paper Figure 1: Clustering Disney patent portfolio (here, circular tree-map)...................................4 Figure 2: First text-mining (word cloud) .............................................................................4 Figure 3: Innovation pace at Disney’s. Role of Pixar therein.................................................5 Figure 4: Emphasizing Pixar complementarity to Disney (circular tree-map)..........................6 Figure 5: Disney network (using co-ownership graph) – excerpt ..........................................6 Figure 6: Innovation pace at Disney’s. Role of ETH Zurich therein........................................7 Figure 7: Innovation pace at Dolby’s. Importance of coding technologies therein..................8 Figure 8: Top IPC/CIB codes ranking ............................................................................... 10 Figure 9: Innovation trends of Dolby portfolio since 2005.................................................. 10 Figure 10: X Citation trend based on Dolby portfolio ......................................................... 11 Figure 11: Innovation pace of set-top boxes for Pay TV (set-top boxes) ............................. 13 Figure 12: Trends in Pay TV business (set-top boxes) ....................................................... 14 Figure 13: Top 10 most active companies in Pay TV (set-top boxes) – trends 2002-2012 .... 14 Figure 14: Top 10 most active companies in Pay TV (set-top boxes) – portfolio maturity..... 15 Figure 15: Global patenting activity – top 10 protected markets (period 1992-2013) ........... 16 Figure 16: Third level text-mining (landscape) ................................................................. 17 Figure 17: Corporate tree (example of Disney) ................................................................. 19 Figure 18: Company thesaurus building in Orbit® - excerpt............................................... 20 Figure 19: Keyword-based search options in Orbit® ........................................................ 20 Figure 20: “Similarity search” option in Orbit® ............................................................... 21
  23. 23. Patentopolis White Paper 1 Understanding Industry Change Case of the entertainment industry © 2013 Patentopolis BV Page 23 Notes and references 1 Judgment of the Court of Justice of the European Union: ITV Broadcasting Ltd and others vs. TV Catchup Ltd (Directive 2001/29/EC – Article 3(1) – Broadcasting by a third party over the internet of signals of commercial television broadcasters – ‘Live streaming’ – Communication to the public) (Case C-607/11) 7 March 2013. Last retrieved on 5 June 2013 at http://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=CELEX:62011CJ0607:EN:HTML 2 Bose R. (2004) “Knowledge management metrics”, Industrial Management & Data Systems, Volume 104 • Number 6 • 2004 • pp. 457-468, Emerald. 3 McCarthy J. (1998) “Intellectual property – America’s overlooked export”, 20 U. Dayton L. Rev. 809, 1998. 4 Disney (2006) “Disney to acquire Pixar”. Press release. 24 January 2006. Last retrieved on 4 September 2007 at: http://corporate.disney.go.com. 5 “Patent family” means all the patents and patent applications relating to the same claimed invention, and usually linked by claiming priority from the same initially filed patent application. There is no such thing as a worldwide patent. Regional patents exist only in some parts of the world. In most cases equivalent patents must be filed or registered in all the countries where the patent owner wishes to enforce the patent rights. All these belong to the same patent family. 6 “Value Ideas Contest: Dolby Labs (DLB) Priced for Zero Growth”, 30 September 2011. Last retrieved on 4 June 2013 at http://www.gurufocus.com/news/146866/value-ideas-contest- dolby-labs-dlb-priced-for-zero-growth 7 About Via Licensing: last retrieved on 5 June 2013 at http://www.vialicensing.com 8 About the ACC licensing program of Via Licensing: last retrieved on 5 June 2013 at http://www.vialicensing.com/licensing/aac-overview.aspx 9 Note that the technology ranking can also be displayed in the Analysis module using the thesaurus of IPC codes which can be renamed (e.g. “Coding or decoding of speech or audio signal” instead of G10L 19/00), like for the name of assignees as shown e.g. in Figure 18. Trends can be observed and analyzed using this tool. 10 “UPDATE 1-China's ZTE Q1 net income trails forecasts”, Reuters, 25 April 2012. Last retrieved on 8 June at http://uk.reuters.com/article/2012/04/25/zte-earns- idUKL3E8FN8Q220120425 11 In Orbit® “legal status” displays information on thousands of types of legal actions affecting the legal status of patents after publication or issuance. “Legal state” combines the legal statuses by distinguishing alive cases (e.g. pending, granted) from dead ones (e.g. expired, revoked). 12 “IPTV Global Forecast (2008-2013)”, International Television Expert Group, November 2009. Last retrieved on 8 June at www.international-television.org/tv_market_data/global- iptv-forecast-2009-2013.html 13 For more details on how to translate concepts into search strategies, please refer to the annex of White Paper 1

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