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Social Networking Tools - Principles and Practice

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Social Networking Tools - Principles and Practice

  1. 1. SOCIAL NETWORKING TOOLS PRINCIPLES & PRACTICE Daniel Beck
  2. 2. Daniel Beck a.k.a. “GTB”
  3. 3. Toyo Gakuen University, Chiba
  4. 4. Kanda Institute of Foreign Languages
  5. 5. listening to music watching video
  6. 6. email communicating with students and faculty short writing assignments from computer or cell (find English mistakes and send them)
  7. 7. Roger Palmer
  8. 8. How should we evaluate?
  9. 9. Brown, H. D. (2007). Teaching by principles – third edition. White Plains: Pearson
  10. 10. TEACHING BY PRINCIPLES BROWN (2007, CH. 4)
  11. 11. PRINCIPLE CATEGORIES • Cognitive Principles • Socioaffective Principles • Linguistic Principles
  12. 12. 6 COGNITIVE PRINCIPLES
  13. 13. AUTOMATICITY Related to fluency. “Efficient second language learning involves a timely movement of the control of a few language forms into the automatic, fluent processing of a relatively unlimited number of language forms. Overanalyzing language and thinking too much about forms, and consciously lingering on rules of language all tend to impede this graduation to automaticity.”
  14. 14. MEANINGFUL LEARNING “The process of making meaningful associations between existing knowledge/experience and new material will lead toward better long- term retention than rote learning of material in isolated pieces.”
  15. 15. ANTICIPATION OF REWARD Human beings are universally driven to act, or “behave,” by the anticipation of some sort of reward—tangible or intangible, short- term or long-term—that will ensue as a result of the behavior.
  16. 16. INTRINSIC MOTIVATION The most powerful rewards are those that are intrinsically motivated within the learner. Because the behavior stems from needs, wants, or desires within oneself, the behavior itself is self-rewarding; therefore, no externally administered reward is necessary.
  17. 17. STRATEGIC INVESTMENT Successful mastery of the second language will be due to a large extent to a learner’s own personal “investment” of time, effort, and attention to the second language in the form of an individualized battery of strategies for comprehending and producing the language.
  18. 18. AUTONOMY Successful mastery of a foreign language will depend to a great extent on learners’ autonomous ability both to take initiative in the classroom and to continue their journey to success beyond the classroom and the teacher.
  19. 19. 3 SOCIOAFFECTIVE PRINCIPLES
  20. 20. LANGUAGE EGO As human beings learn to use a second language, they also develop a new mode of thinking, feeling, and acting—a second identity. The new “language ego,” intertwined with the second language, can easily create within the learner a sense of fragility, a defensiveness, and a raising of inhibitions.
  21. 21. WILLINGNESS TO COMMUNICATE Successful language learners generally believe in themselves and in their capacity to accomplish communicative tasks, and are therefore willing risk takers in their attempts to produce and to interpret language that is a bit beyond their absolute certainty. Their willingness to communicate results in the generation of both output (from the learner) and input (to the learner).
  22. 22. LANGUAGE-CULTURE CONNECTION Whenever you teach a language, you also teach a complex system of cultural customs, values, and ways of thinking, feeling, and acting.
  23. 23. LINGUISTIC PRINCIPLES
  24. 24. NATIVE LANGUAGE EFFECT The native language of learners exerts a strong influence on the acquisition of the target language system. While that native system will exercise both facilitating and interfering effects on the production and comprehension of the new language, the interfering effects are likely to be the most salient.
  25. 25. INTERLANGUAGE Second language learners tend to go through a systematic or quasi- systematic developmental process as they progress to full competence in the target language. Successful interlanguage development is partially a result of utilizing feedback from others.
  26. 26. COMMUNICATIVE COMPETENCE Given that communicative competence is the goal of a language classroom, instruction needs to point toward all its components: organizational, pragmatic, strategic, and psychomotor. Communicative goals are best achieved by giving due attention to language use and not just usage, to fluency and not just accuracy, to authentic language and contexts, and to students’ eventual need to apply classroom learning to previously unrehearsed contexts in the real world.
  27. 27. PRINCIPLES OF CALL BROWN (2007, CH. 12)
  28. 28. Use technology to support the pedagogical goals of the class Don’t use technology for technology’s sake.
  29. 29. Evaluate the appropriateness of software for your purpose.
  30. 30. Create a classroom environment in which CALL is affirmed by the students. Students should be able to “buy in”
  31. 31. Make the technology accessible to all learners. Everyone should benefit.
  32. 32. Use technology effectively. Students should learn language better or faster
  33. 33. Use technology efficiently. Save time. (ex Dictionary searches, Wikipedia
  34. 34. Have a backup plan in case the technology fails.
  35. 35. BENEFITS OF CALL BROWN (2007, CH. 12)
  36. 36. BENEFITS OF CALL • opportunity to notice • private space for mistakes • multimodal • distance feedback • immediate, personalized • convenient for written feedback practice • individualization • collaboration • self-pacing • variety of resources opportunity to notice multimodal immediate, personalized feedback individualization self-pacing private space for mistakes distance feedback convenient for written practice collaboration variety of resources
  37. 37. SOCIAL NETWORKING
  38. 38. Mason, R., & Rennie, F. (2008). E- learning and social networking handbook. New York: Routledge
  39. 39. Richardson, W. (2010). Blogs, wikis, podcasts, and other powerful web tools for classrooms, 3rd ed. Thousand Oaks: Corwin Press
  40. 40. SOCIAL NETWORKING SITES HAVE … • Profile • Social Network • Semi-persistent public comments Boyd (2006) profile - identifiable handle, information, photograph.
  41. 41. “ The essence of social networking is that the users generate the content. This has potentially profound ” implications for education. – Mason & Rennie (2008)
  42. 42. 2.0
  43. 43. ED 2.0
  44. 44. TESOL 2.0
  45. 45. USER-GENERATED CONTENT • Tools to actively engage in construction • Content continually refreshed by users • Tools support collaborative work • Shared community spaces not passive not expert team-work motivation
  46. 46. THEORETICAL CONSIDERATIONS • Collaborative Learning • Student-Centered Course Design • Compatible with Constructivist Theory • Connectivist Theory • Learning Design • Outcome-based Design Constructivist - learning is an active process of constructing knowledge. Instruction is a process that involves supporting that construction rather than communicating knowledge.
  47. 47. PRINCIPLES OF SOCIAL NETWORKING IN TEACHING MASON & RENNIE (2008, PP. 49-51)
  48. 48. No panacea.
  49. 49. Pedagogy first
  50. 50. Initial Induction
  51. 51. need to be serious
  52. 52. What are the tools?
  53. 53. BLOGS
  54. 54. ADVANTAGES OF BLOGS • Reflective • Interactive (comments) • Semi-permanent
  55. 55. USES OF BLOGS • class • online readings • journals information management • resources • portfolio • class assignment • links • feedback management • photos • showcase • best practices gallery • discussion • collaboration topics Richardson, W. (2010). Blogs, wikis, podcasts, and other powerful web tools for classrooms, 3rd ed. Thousand Oaks: Corwin Press
  56. 56. Wikis Wikis
  57. 57. wiki |ˈwikē| noun 1 website that allows the easy creation and editing of any number of interlinked web pages via a web browser… . Wikis … are often used to create collaborative websites, to power community websites, for personal note taking, in corporate intranets, and in knowledge management systems. and in enlightened TESOL classes
  58. 58. PODCASTS Podcasts Podcasts
  59. 59. podcasting |päd ˈkast ɪŋ| noun 1 a distribution method for media-rich content via the internet using “push” technology to enable the user to subscribe and automatically receive new content.
  60. 60. podcast |päd ˈkast| noun 1 media that is distributed via podcasting.
  61. 61. distribution method
  62. 62. audio a distribution method for media-rich content (eg. audio, video, etc…) via the internet using syndication technology to enable the user to subscribe and automatically receive new content. bob and rob show
  63. 63. video a distribution method for media-rich content (eg. audio, video, etc…) via the internet using syndication technology to enable the user to subscribe and automatically receive new content.
  64. 64. photographs / images a distribution method for media-rich content (eg. audio, video, etc…) via the internet using syndication technology to enable the user to subscribe and automatically receive new content.
  65. 65. Files a distribution method for media-rich content (eg. audio, video, etc…) via the internet using syndication technology to enable the user to subscribe and automatically receive new content.
  66. 66. push technology
  67. 67. a distribution method for media-rich content (eg. audio, video, etc…) via the internet using syndication technology to enable the user to subscribe and automatically receive new content.
  68. 68. ADVANTAGES OF PODCASTS • Free • Authentic language use • Automated process
  69. 69. SOCIAL NETWORKING
  70. 70. Facebook Public Networks (region, workplace, school, etc…) Personal Networks(family, friends, colleagues, classmates) Groups Photos / Videos Discourse (Message, IM, Wall, Tagging)
  71. 71. MICROBLOGGING
  72. 72. • Twitter twitter.com Twitter → Buzz
  73. 73. Twitter.com
  74. 74. #hashtags
  75. 75. google.com/buzz
  76. 76. SOCIAL BOOKMARKING
  77. 77. social bookmarking |ˈsō sh əl • ˈboŏkˌmärk ɪŋ| noun 1 a method for Internet users to store, organize, search, and manage bookmarks of web pages on the Internet with the help of metadata.
  78. 78. delicious.com
  79. 79. diigo.com
  80. 80. PHOTO SHARING
  81. 81. Flickr.com
  82. 82. VIDEO SHARING
  83. 83. YouTube.com
  84. 84. RSS FEEDS
  85. 85. RSS (Real Simple Syndication) noun 1 a distribution method for media-rich content via the internet using “push” technology to enable the user to subscribe and automatically receive new content.
  86. 86. push technology
  87. 87. a distribution method for media-rich content (eg. audio, video, etc…) via the internet using syndication technology to enable the user to subscribe and automatically receive new content.
  88. 88. Google Reader
  89. 89. Other Web Tools
  90. 90. E-PORTFOLIOS
  91. 91. SECOND LIFE
  92. 92. SCREENCASTS
  93. 93. ONLINE FORUMS
  94. 94. E-BOOKS
  95. 95. IM
  96. 96. SKYPE (VOIP)
  97. 97. GAMES
  98. 98. MASHUPS
  99. 99. MOBILE LEARNING
  100. 100. “ It is the powerful ideas behind the tools and services that have so much ” potential for education – Mason & Rennie (2008) Web 2.0 is actually more than a set of tools and services. It is the powerful ideas behind the tools and services that have so much potential for education: the reality of user-generated content, the network effects of mass participation, and the openness and low threshold for easy access.
  101. 101. Thank you!

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