Structural Inequality In Education

6,446 views

Published on

Published in: Economy & Finance, Technology
0 Comments
5 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
6,446
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
7
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
142
Comments
0
Likes
5
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Structural Inequality In Education

  1. 1. Structural inequality in education By Paul Chan, Samuel Ko, Edmund Lo
  2. 2. Social Stratification http://www.youtube.com/ watch? v = RWfLh6_RAEc
  3. 3. Social Stratification <ul><li>Social stratification refers to the hierarchical arrangement of individuals into divisions of power and wealth within a society </li></ul>monthly income, work occupation, housing accommodation (size, owned or rented, government or private), oversea passport, investments, language speaking ability, alumni, status in the community, friends and family...etc
  4. 4. Social Stratification <ul><li>“ classification of persons into groups based on shared socio-economic conditions” </li></ul><ul><li>Social stratification has been shown to cause many social problems A comprehensive study of major world economies revealed that homicide, infant mortality, obesity, teenage pregnancies, emotional depression and prison population all correlate with higher social inequality </li></ul><ul><li>How about Educational Equality ? </li></ul>
  5. 5. Social Stratification <ul><li>Some interesting social phenomenon … </li></ul><ul><li>Men dominate the powerful positions in business and politics, this is reflected in education opportunities. </li></ul><ul><li>When girls failed science subjects, the blame is often placed on gender factor - 'that girls are not suited to be scientists' </li></ul><ul><li>When boys fail science subjects that situation is taken more seriously. </li></ul><ul><li>This is reflected in the subjects that women study in University. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Social Stratification <ul><li>In a capitalist society , the role of education is to prepare workers with labour skills who will accept their subordinate position without questioning it. </li></ul><ul><li>Hong Kong is a capitalist society </li></ul><ul><li>People in Hong Kong are divided into classes </li></ul><ul><li>i.e. Lower class, Middle class, Upper class </li></ul>
  7. 7. Social Stratification <ul><li>Lower class - mainly composed of elderly and unskilled workers - suffering from low and decreasing income - barely maintain their living </li></ul><ul><li>Middle class - mainly composed of professionals and managers - discrimination against the lower class - 1997 economic depression led to increased tension between 2 classes </li></ul><ul><li>Upper class </li></ul>
  8. 8. Education Problems caused by Social Stratification <ul><li>“ In teaching, there should be no distinction of classes ” </li></ul><ul><li>(Confucius) </li></ul>
  9. 9. Education Problems caused by Social Stratification <ul><li>Did education provides equal opportunities to all members of society? </li></ul><ul><li>The answer is…… NO!!! </li></ul>
  10. 10. Education Problems caused by Social Stratification <ul><li>In modern stratified society School = a means of passing on social status from one generation to another </li></ul><ul><li>Parents want their children to get a good education </li></ul><ul><li>upper Strata will naturally use their power and influence to ensure the best education for their children </li></ul>
  11. 11. Education Problems caused by Social Stratification <ul><li>The fact…. </li></ul><ul><li>Poor children = less represented in famous schools and upper academic bands </li></ul><ul><li>Girls = less represented than boys in secondary school science streams </li></ul><ul><li>Newcomer children from mainland = fall behind and may have to repeat a year of school </li></ul>
  12. 12. Education Problems caused by Social Stratification <ul><li>The fact…. </li></ul><ul><li>Children from high social status families have more computers and better software at home than other children. </li></ul><ul><li>HK wealthiest families have less difficulty paying fees for international schools, and study overseas. </li></ul>
  13. 13. Education Problems caused by Social Stratification http://www.youtube.com/ watch? v = JEczvyM3Boc
  14. 14. School Fees of a DSS school (St.Paul’s co-ed) <ul><li>With effect from September 2009, all Primary One students are enrolled under DSS and the school fee is HK$60,000 per student per year. </li></ul>
  15. 15. 2009-2010 School Fees for Secondary School <ul><li>Class Tuition fee per annum (HK$) </li></ul><ul><li>S1 (DSS) 52,000 </li></ul><ul><li>S2 (DSS) 52,000 </li></ul><ul><li>S3 (DSS) 52,000 </li></ul><ul><li>S4 (DSS) 52,000 </li></ul><ul><li>S5 (DSS) 52,000 </li></ul><ul><li>S6 (DSS) 52,000 </li></ul><ul><li>S7 (DSS) 52,000 </li></ul>
  16. 16. How much we need to pay to complete both primary and secondary in DSS school <ul><li>$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ </li></ul><ul><li>Let us calculate together!!!! </li></ul>
  17. 17. Five Categories of Fee Remission <ul><li>The Fee Remission Scheme is a means tested-scheme. </li></ul><ul><li>Benchmark disposable income $360,000 per year. </li></ul><ul><li>Family disposable income < $360,000 qualify for 100% fee remission. </li></ul><ul><li>Family disposable income exceeds the benchmark disposable income by no more than HK$90,000 would qualify for a fee remission of HK$40,000 (for Secondary School) or HK$48,000 (for Primary School), and the fee payable per year would be HK$12,000. </li></ul><ul><li>Family disposable income exceeds the benchmark disposable income by no more than HK$180,000 would qualify for a fee remission of HK$28,000 (for Secondary School) or HK$36,000 (for Primary School), and the fee payable per year would be HK$24,000. </li></ul>
  18. 18. Five Categories of Fee Remission <ul><li>Family disposable income exceeds the benchmark disposable income by no more than HK$270,000 would qualify for a fee remission of HK$16,000 (for Secondary School) or HK$24,000 (for Primary School), and the fee payable per year would be HK$36,000. </li></ul><ul><li>Family disposable income exceeds the benchmark disposable income by no more than HK$360,000 would qualify for a fee remission of HK$4,000 (for Secondary School) or HK$12,000 (for Primary School), and the fee payable per year would be HK$48,000. </li></ul>
  19. 19. Canadian International School <ul><li>ANNUAL CAPITAL LEVY (payable by non-debenture holders) Pre-Reception to Grade 12 $21,500 </li></ul><ul><li>TUITION FEES ** </li></ul><ul><li>Pre-Reception, Reception $68,500 </li></ul><ul><li>Prep to Grade 4 $92,000 </li></ul><ul><li>Grade 5 to Grade 8 $94,700 </li></ul><ul><li>Grade 9 to Grade 12 $102,800 </li></ul>
  20. 20. How much we need to pay to complete both primary and secondary in International school <ul><li>$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ </li></ul><ul><li>Let us calculate together one more time !!!! </li></ul>
  21. 21. Videos for child education http:// www.youtube.com/watch?v = nwWSQdQOQLQ
  22. 22. Raw Data
  23. 23. Some Surveys <ul><li>Do you support the continuation of educational ability tests? </li></ul><ul><li>Yes: 90% </li></ul><ul><li>No: 10% </li></ul><ul><li>(Sample size: 1075, 20 or older) </li></ul><ul><li>2008, goo Research (Japanese Research group) </li></ul>http://whatjapanthinks.com/2008/11/11/national-tests-league-tables-widely-favoured-in-japan/
  24. 24. Some Surveys <ul><li>Why do you think the result of educational ability test should not be published? </li></ul><ul><li>Possibility of increasing educational disparity between schools. 39% </li></ul><ul><li>Will escalate competition between local authorities. 33% </li></ul><ul><li>Possibility of discrimination against pupils with poor results. 24% </li></ul><ul><li>Worry that budgets for poorly-performing schools will be cut. 4% </li></ul><ul><li>(Sample size: 226, 20 or older) </li></ul><ul><li>2008, goo Research (Japanese Research group) </li></ul>http://whatjapanthinks.com/2008/11/11/national-tests-league-tables-widely-favoured-in-japan/
  25. 25. Some Surveys <ul><li>Do you think it would be good to have more English ability? </li></ul><ul><li>Yes 86% </li></ul><ul><li>No 14% </li></ul><ul><li>(Sample size: 549, teens to 30s, 1:1 male to female ratio) </li></ul><ul><li>2007, goo Research (Japanese Research group) </li></ul>http://whatjapanthinks.com/2008/02/02/young-japanese-desire-english/
  26. 26. Some Surveys <ul><li>How satisfied were you (or are you) with your English education at middle and high school? </li></ul><ul><li>Satisfied 3% Satisfied to some extent 23% Dissatisfied to some extent 49% Dissatisfied 25% </li></ul><ul><li>(Sample size: 549, teens to 30s, 1:1 male to female ratio) </li></ul><ul><li>2007, goo Research (Japanese Research group) </li></ul>http://whatjapanthinks.com/2008/02/02/young-japanese-desire-english/
  27. 27. Hong Kong Genders <ul><li>Age 15 – 64 </li></ul><ul><li>Male 2,551,256 </li></ul><ul><li>Female 2,713,532 </li></ul><ul><li>2009, cia.gov </li></ul>
  28. 28. Hong Kong Languages <ul><li>Cantonese 89.2% </li></ul><ul><li>Other Chinese 6.4% </li></ul><ul><li>English 3.2% </li></ul><ul><li>2001, cia.gov </li></ul>
  29. 29. Hong Kong Languages <ul><li>English 3.2% </li></ul><ul><li>Cantonese 89.2% </li></ul><ul><li>Other Chinese 6.4% </li></ul>
  30. 30. School Life Expectancy (primary to tertiary) <ul><li>Male: 20 years Female: 21 years (2006) </li></ul><ul><li> Male: 17 years Female: 17 years (2004) </li></ul><ul><ul><li> Male: 14 years Female: 13 years (2006) </li></ul></ul><ul><li> Male: 11 years Female: 11 years (2006) </li></ul><ul><li>cia.gov </li></ul>
  31. 31. <ul><li>Access to high quality and innovate designs often becomes privileged and adopted early only by the elites. But as innovation matures, mainstream audiences begin to have access. </li></ul><ul><li>Eventually, innovation will be embedded almost in every household and people will figure ways to produce productivity and efficiency with it. </li></ul>Something About Technology http://blog.lib.umn.edu/lecy0013/architecture/old-computer-thumb.jpg
  32. 32. <ul><li>Access to high quality and innovate education often becomes privileged and adopted early only by the elites. But as education matures, mainstream audiences begin to have access. </li></ul><ul><li>Eventually, education will be embedded almost in every household and people will figure ways to produce productivity and efficiency with it. </li></ul>Something About Education http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3184/2295609088_8d898b8443_o.jpg
  33. 34. http://backroadphotorestoration.com/images/old_car.jpg
  34. 35. http://www.snhauto.com/images/Company%20Logos.jpg
  35. 36. lexus.com
  36. 37. jeep.com
  37. 38. http://cache.gizmodo.com/assets/resources/sonyfinal/sonyfinalmed_gizmodo.jpg
  38. 39. http://bp1.blogger.com/_AoiAVKCipPk/RrfVoBg4YBI/AAAAAAAAAPQ/BQc5qtx4mZQ/s1600-h/class6.jpg
  39. 40. <ul><li>Government Schools </li></ul><ul><li>Subsidized Schools </li></ul><ul><li>Direct Subsidy Scheme Schools </li></ul><ul><li>Private Schools </li></ul><ul><li>Private International Schools </li></ul><ul><li>English Schools Foundation </li></ul>
  40. 41. <ul><li>Exams </li></ul><ul><li>Competitions for Tertiary Education </li></ul><ul><li>Curriculum </li></ul><ul><li>Subjects </li></ul><ul><li>Stakeholders </li></ul><ul><li>Career </li></ul><ul><li>Status (Class) </li></ul><ul><li>Location </li></ul><ul><li>Background </li></ul><ul><li>Faith </li></ul>

×