<Insert Picture Here>Introduction to enterprise applications capacity planningusing queuing modelsLeonid Grinshpan, Ph.D.C...
Disclaimer The following presentation is intended for information purposes  only, and may not be incorporated into any con...
Presentation’s goal     The presentation provides an introduction to enterprise       applications capacity planning using...
Presentation’s structureSection 1Do we really need modeling for capacity planning?Section 2Methodology of enterprise appli...
Section 1DO WE REALLY NEED MODELING FORCAPACITY PLANNING?Can we just go by our gut feeling?                               ...
Quiz 1. Ticket reservation application• A ticket reservation application is deployed on one server with 8  CPUs.• System d...
Quiz 1. Ticket reservation application (cont)                                                7
Quiz 2. Ticket reservation and on-line payment  applications• A ticket reservation application per Quiz 1 uses only 50% of...
Quiz 2. Ticket reservation and on-line payment  applications (cont)                                                 9
Section 2METHODOLOGY OF ENTERPRISEAPPLICATIONS CAPACITY PLANNING                                 10
Generalized enterprise application architecture                                                  11
What is a main application performance indicator from the users perspective?                                              ...
Mapping application into queuing model                   Hardware server representation Total time in node = time in waiti...
Mapping application into queuing model (cont 2)                                                  14
Mapping application into queuing model (cont 3)The relationships between the components of a real system and the          ...
Transaction response time and transaction profile          Transaction time is a time spent in “cloud”                    ...
Transaction response time and transaction profile  (cont 2)                                                    17
Input data for capacity planning1. Workload characterization    List of business transactions    Number of users per eac...
Input data for capacity planning (cont 2)      2. Transactions profilesTransaction profile is comprised of the time interv...
Building and solving models using open source   Java Modeling ToolOpen source software package Java Modeling Tools (JMT) c...
Definition of nodes in JMT Node “Users” has as many processing units as total number of users             Node “Web server...
Definition of workload and transaction profile inJMT                                                    22
Solving JMT modelReport ABC time is 0.52 + 0.57 = 1.09 sec                   Business Rule X time is 0.52 + 2.84 = 3.36 se...
Solving JMT model (cont 2)Total utilization of Web server is 4.6% and A&D server is 12.7%     Transaction Business Rule X ...
What is needed for enterprise application capacity    planning ?1. Description of system architecture (hardware servers , ...
Section 3SOLVING MODELS AND EVALUATINGWHAT-IF SCENARIOS                                26
Open source vs. commercial model solversOpen source solvers   Limited functionality   Lack of extensive and up-to-day li...
Building and solving models using commercial products  Three-tier system  Transaction profiles Transaction                ...
Building and solving models using commercialproducts (cont 2)            Specification of hardware servers            Desc...
Building and solving models using commercialproducts (cont 3)                 Transaction profiles                        ...
Building and solving models using commercialproducts (cont 4)                  Description of users                       ...
Building and solving models using commercial    products (cont 5)                             MAIN MODEL DELIVERABLES   A...
Common what-if scenarios1. Changing hardware platform2. Analysis of different operating systems3. Workload variations4. As...
Analysis of what-if scenarios                Faster Application server                 All three servers are faster       ...
Analysis of what-if scenarios (cont 2)   Transaction time (seconds)          Transaction time (seconds)     Baseline syste...
Analysis of what-if scenarios (cont 3)        Transaction time (seconds)        Transaction time (seconds)System with fast...
Analysis of what-if scenarios (cont 3)                 Utilization of system servers (%)                                  ...
Example of an Oracle enterprise applicationproduction deployment    DO WE REALLY NEED MODELING FOR CAPACITY               ...
To learn more about enterprise applications          capacity planning please check                 author’s book“Solving ...
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Introduction to enterprise applications capacity planning

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The presentation provides an introduction to enterprise applications capacity planning using queuing models. Oracle’s Consulting uses presented methodology to estimate hardware architecture and capacity of planned for deployment enterprise applications for Oracle customers.

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Introduction to enterprise applications capacity planning

  1. 1. <Insert Picture Here>Introduction to enterprise applications capacity planningusing queuing modelsLeonid Grinshpan, Ph.D.Consulting Technical Director
  2. 2. Disclaimer The following presentation is intended for information purposes only, and may not be incorporated into any contract. It is not a commitment to deliver any material, code, or functionality All brands and trademarks mentioned are the property of their owners. 2
  3. 3. Presentation’s goal The presentation provides an introduction to enterprise applications capacity planning using queuing models Oracle’s Consulting uses presented methodology to estimate hardware architecture and capacity of planned for deployment enterprise applications for Oracle customers 3
  4. 4. Presentation’s structureSection 1Do we really need modeling for capacity planning?Section 2Methodology of enterprise applications capacity planningSection 3Solving models and evaluating what-if scenarios 4
  5. 5. Section 1DO WE REALLY NEED MODELING FORCAPACITY PLANNING?Can we just go by our gut feeling? 5
  6. 6. Quiz 1. Ticket reservation application• A ticket reservation application is deployed on one server with 8 CPUs.• System delivers 10 seconds response time and utilizes server’s CPU at 50% under workload described in a table: Transaction name Number of users Transaction rate Ticket Reservation (TR) 250 6 per user per hourQ. How many more users an application can support without response time degradation exceeding 10% ? 6
  7. 7. Quiz 1. Ticket reservation application (cont) 7
  8. 8. Quiz 2. Ticket reservation and on-line payment applications• A ticket reservation application per Quiz 1 uses only 50% of 8 CPU server capacity. Let’s deploy on the same server on-line payment application.• Workload for both applications is described in a table: Transaction name Number of users Transaction rate Ticket Reservation (TR) 250 6 per user per hour On-line payment (OLP) ???? 10 per user per hourQ. How many on-line payment users system can support delivering on-line payment transaction time 8 seconds? 8
  9. 9. Quiz 2. Ticket reservation and on-line payment applications (cont) 9
  10. 10. Section 2METHODOLOGY OF ENTERPRISEAPPLICATIONS CAPACITY PLANNING 10
  11. 11. Generalized enterprise application architecture 11
  12. 12. What is a main application performance indicator from the users perspective? 12
  13. 13. Mapping application into queuing model Hardware server representation Total time in node = time in waiting queue + time in processing unit 13
  14. 14. Mapping application into queuing model (cont 2) 14
  15. 15. Mapping application into queuing model (cont 3)The relationships between the components of a real system and the components of its model Component of application Matching object in queuing model Users Node “Users” Web server Node “Web server” Application and Database Node “A&D server” server Requests from users Cars 15
  16. 16. Transaction response time and transaction profile Transaction time is a time spent in “cloud” 16
  17. 17. Transaction response time and transaction profile (cont 2) 17
  18. 18. Input data for capacity planning1. Workload characterization List of business transactions Number of users per each business transaction Per each transaction a number of transactions per user per hour (transaction rate). Transaction name Number of users Transaction rate Report ABC 20 12 Business Rule X 10 8 Consolidation Y 5 3 18
  19. 19. Input data for capacity planning (cont 2) 2. Transactions profilesTransaction profile is comprised of the time intervals a transaction has spent insystem servers it has visited when application was serving only that singletransaction Transaction name Service demand (seconds) Web server A&D server Report ABC 0.5 0.5 Business Rule X 0.5 2.5 Consolidation Y 0.5 9.5 19
  20. 20. Building and solving models using open source Java Modeling ToolOpen source software package Java Modeling Tools (JMT) can be downloaded from http://jmt.sourceforge.net/. 20
  21. 21. Definition of nodes in JMT Node “Users” has as many processing units as total number of users Node “Web server” has one processing unit Node “A&D server” has one processing unit 21
  22. 22. Definition of workload and transaction profile inJMT 22
  23. 23. Solving JMT modelReport ABC time is 0.52 + 0.57 = 1.09 sec Business Rule X time is 0.52 + 2.84 = 3.36 sec Consolidation Y time is 0.52 + 10.78 = 11.30 sec 23
  24. 24. Solving JMT model (cont 2)Total utilization of Web server is 4.6% and A&D server is 12.7% Transaction Business Rule X utilizes Web server at 1.1% and A&D server at 5.5% Transaction Consolidation Y utilizes Web server at 0.2% and A&D server at 3.9% 24
  25. 25. What is needed for enterprise application capacity planning ?1. Description of system architecture (hardware servers , hosted software components)2. Input data:  Workload characterization (flow of business transactions from system users)  Transaction profiles (service demand from single transaction)3. Model solver 25
  26. 26. Section 3SOLVING MODELS AND EVALUATINGWHAT-IF SCENARIOS 26
  27. 27. Open source vs. commercial model solversOpen source solvers Limited functionality Lack of extensive and up-to-day libraries of hardware platformsCommercial solvers Accept input data in a form of hardware and software specifications and benchmarks Automate study of multiple what-if scenarios Components of broader suites Include collectors of input data that can be feed into model directly 27
  28. 28. Building and solving models using commercial products Three-tier system Transaction profiles Transaction Service demand (seconds) name Web server App server DB server Report ABC 0.5 0.2 0.3Business Rule X 0.5 1.0 1.5Consolidation Y 0.5 7.0 2.5 28
  29. 29. Building and solving models using commercialproducts (cont 2) Specification of hardware servers Description of business transactions 29
  30. 30. Building and solving models using commercialproducts (cont 3) Transaction profiles 30
  31. 31. Building and solving models using commercialproducts (cont 4) Description of users 31
  32. 32. Building and solving models using commercial products (cont 5) MAIN MODEL DELIVERABLES Average transaction response time for each transaction Utilization of each hardware server Transaction time (seconds) Utilization of system servers (%) 32
  33. 33. Common what-if scenarios1. Changing hardware platform2. Analysis of different operating systems3. Workload variations4. Assessment of impact of network and remote users5. Changing number of cores and CPUs6. Server farms7. Redistribution of application’s software components 33
  34. 34. Analysis of what-if scenarios Faster Application server All three servers are faster 34
  35. 35. Analysis of what-if scenarios (cont 2) Transaction time (seconds) Transaction time (seconds) Baseline system System with fast Application server 35
  36. 36. Analysis of what-if scenarios (cont 3) Transaction time (seconds) Transaction time (seconds)System with fast Application server System with three fast servers 36
  37. 37. Analysis of what-if scenarios (cont 3) Utilization of system servers (%) 37
  38. 38. Example of an Oracle enterprise applicationproduction deployment DO WE REALLY NEED MODELING FOR CAPACITY PLANNING? Can we just go by our gut feeling? 38
  39. 39. To learn more about enterprise applications capacity planning please check author’s book“Solving Enterprise Applications Performance Puzzles: Queuing Models to the Rescue” (available in bookstores and from Web booksellers) http://www.amazon.com/Solving-Enterprise- Applications-Performance- Puzzles/dp/1118061578/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8& qid=1326134402&sr=8-1https://www.amazon.com/author/leonid.grinshpan Contact Leonid Grinshpan at: leonid.grinshpan@oracle.com 39

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