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 Stress is a normal physical response to events 
that make you feel threatened or upset your 
balance in some way. When y...
 When you perceive a threat, your nervous system 
responds by releasing a flood of stress hormones, 
including adrenaline...
 Stress management refers to the wide spectrum 
of techniques and psychotherapies aimed at 
controlling a person's levels...
 It may seem that there’s nothing you can do 
about stress. The bills won’t stop coming, there 
will never be more hours ...
1. Identify the sources of stress in your life. 
> To identify your true sources of stress, look closely at your habits, 
...
2. Start a Stress Journal 
A stress journal can help you identify the regular 
stressors in your life and the way you deal...
3. Look at how you currently cope with stress 
Think about the ways you currently manage and 
cope with stress in your lif...
These coping strategies may temporarily reduce stress, but they 
cause more damage in the long run: 
 Smoking 
 Drinking...
Change the situation: 
 Avoid the stressor 
 Alter the stressor 
Change your reaction: 
 Adapt to the stressor 
 Accep...
1: Avoid unnecessary stress 
2: Alter the situation 
3: Adapt to the stressor 
4: Accept the things you can’t change 
5: M...
Once you’ve mastered these core skills you’ll 
have the confidence to face stressful challenges, 
knowing that you’ll alwa...
THANK YOU
Stress and stress management
Stress and stress management
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Stress and stress management

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it is all about stress and stress management techniques.

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Stress and stress management

  1. 1.  Stress is a normal physical response to events that make you feel threatened or upset your balance in some way. When you sense danger— whether it’s real or imagined—the body's defenses kick into high gear in a rapid, automatic process known as the “fight-or-flight-or-freeze” reaction, or the stress response.
  2. 2.  When you perceive a threat, your nervous system responds by releasing a flood of stress hormones, including adrenaline and cortisol. These hormones rouse the body for emergency action.  Your heart pounds faster, muscles tighten, blood pressure rises, breath quickens, and your senses become sharper. These physical changes increase your strength and stamina, speed your reaction time, and enhance your focus—preparing you to either fight or flee from the danger at hand.
  3. 3.  Stress management refers to the wide spectrum of techniques and psychotherapies aimed at controlling a person's levels of stress, especially chronic stress, usually for the purpose of improving everyday functioning.
  4. 4.  It may seem that there’s nothing you can do about stress. The bills won’t stop coming, there will never be more hours in the day, and your career and family responsibilities will always be demanding. But you have more control than you might think. In fact, the simple realization that you’re in control of your life is the foundation of stress management. Managing stress is all about taking charge: of your thoughts, emotions, schedule, and the way you deal with problems.
  5. 5. 1. Identify the sources of stress in your life. > To identify your true sources of stress, look closely at your habits, attitude, and excuses:  Do you explain away stress as temporary (“I just have a million things going on right now”) even though you can’t remember the last time you took a breather?  Do you define stress as an integral part of your work or home life (“Things are always crazy around here”) or as a part of your personality (“I have a lot of nervous energy, that’s all”).  Do you blame your stress on other people or outside events, or view it as entirely normal and unexceptional? Until you accept responsibility for the role you play in creating or maintaining it, your stress level will remain outside your control.
  6. 6. 2. Start a Stress Journal A stress journal can help you identify the regular stressors in your life and the way you deal with them. Each time you feel stressed, keep track of it in your journal. As you keep a daily log, you will begin to see patterns and common themes.Write down:  What caused your stress (make a guess if you’re unsure)  How you felt, both physically and emotionally  How you acted in response  What you did to make yourself feel better
  7. 7. 3. Look at how you currently cope with stress Think about the ways you currently manage and cope with stress in your life. Your stress journal can help you identify them. Are your coping strategies healthy or unhealthy, helpful or unproductive? Unfortunately, many people cope with stress in ways that compound the problem.
  8. 8. These coping strategies may temporarily reduce stress, but they cause more damage in the long run:  Smoking  Drinking too much  Overeating or undereating  Zoning out for hours in front of the TV or computer  Withdrawing from friends, family, and activities  Using pills or drugs to relax  Sleeping too much  Procrastinating  Filling up every minute of the day to avoid facing problems  Taking out your stress on others (lashing out, angry outbursts, physical violence)
  9. 9. Change the situation:  Avoid the stressor  Alter the stressor Change your reaction:  Adapt to the stressor  Accept the stressor
  10. 10. 1: Avoid unnecessary stress 2: Alter the situation 3: Adapt to the stressor 4: Accept the things you can’t change 5: Make time for fun and relaxation 6: Adopt a healthy lifestyle 7: Adjusting Your Attitude
  11. 11. Once you’ve mastered these core skills you’ll have the confidence to face stressful challenges, knowing that you’ll always be able to rapidly bring yourself back into balance.
  12. 12. THANK YOU

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