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Mobile learning in Cambodia with Grit and KAPE

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Mobile learning in Cambodia with Grit and KAPE

  1. 1. Mobile learning in Cambodia Experimental technology based learning interventions with Grit and KAPE
  2. 2. Agenda 1. The case for mobile learning 2. Where we‟re going with (+ edu innovations) 3. The Grit pilot @ PIO 4. Implementation at the demonstration school 5. Q&A and demonstrations (15 min)
  3. 3. Why mobile?
  4. 4. Isn‟t that kinda gimmicky? Aren‟t there more basic needs to worry about? Mobiles are just distracting (in the classroom). That‟s expensive and a luxury item.
  5. 5. Why mobile?
  6. 6. It scales.
  7. 7. x x
  8. 8. The big idea • The internet, particularly though the mobile phone, is the catalyst for transformational innovation in education. • We have just begun to explore how the internet might be used to promote learning. • The mobile phone will redefine education. • These innovations are more likely to come from the „extremes‟ – people working in difficult conditions with few resources. Places like Cambodia.
  9. 9. Plan on the future • The growth of mobile in developing countries is not linear, it‟s closer to being exponential. • Computers that cost $1000 today will be mobile devices that cost $10 in 8 years time. (Bill Joy on Moore's Law). • There‟s a US$35 “iPad” like tablet in India. • There are 5.6 billion active mobile subscriptions in the world.
  10. 10. What are we to do? • ICT is one of the most powerful tools for educational reform across the system. • ICT has significant potential for supporting education in remote and conflict –affected areas.
  11. 11. Our intent Experiment with new technology- assisted models to provide under- served people groups with greater opportunities to learn.
  12. 12. Grit hypothesis We can accelerate learning outcomes if students are able to access and use mobile tablet devices containing existing content. (Improvement will be even higher if we can use localised content).
  13. 13. Grit overview • Software solution that runs on mobile tablet devices. • Aggregates educational content and makes it easy to use for learners in developing countries. • Re-use rather than re-invent. • In future, the software will use an adaptive, personalised curriculum to engage learners to meet them where they are at. • But for now, it‟s a simple supplementary mechanism for learners.
  14. 14. Grit in practice • Android tablet (from $100 generic Chinese tablet to $210 Google Nexus7) • Locked down so you can‟t “break it” • Loaded with hand picked content (all free or $2): • Videos • Games • Quizzes • Tutorials
  15. 15. The PIO trial • People Improvement Organisation (PIO) runs 3 schools, about 1,000 students on old rubbish dump. • Grit pilot test started 2nd September 2012. • Focused just on math and grade 3 (8yr+) • Picked 1 class. 36 students in the class. 16 were randomly selected to participate. The others were the control group. • All 36 students given a 21 question standardised math test before starting.
  16. 16. What‟s the impact? 52% increase on average on test scores compared with the control. (after approximately 20 hours of use)
  17. 17. This means.. 19% 48% 14% 52% 29% 62%
  18. 18. Insights • Feedback is immediate. Reduces time required to go through the problem solving loop. • Encourages risk taking. Prevents loss of face. • Naturally encourages collaboration and discussion. • Digital literacy is a by product.
  19. 19. Grows confidence
  20. 20. Challenges • Cheap devices are… cheap. • Electricity is a challenge. • Logistics can be time consuming. • Keeping devices charged. • Allocating devices. • Need to time limit some apps. • English is a barrier on some of the apps.
  21. 21. Opportunities • Use in groups of two for peer learning. • Use videos. • Use older students as tutors. • Experiment with using it as part of the classroom. • Try with high school students (they‟re very interested). • Game based programming.
  22. 22. Copy relevant innovations • Super smart guy, started tutoring his cousin & family by putting videos on YouTube. • It went viral and today it has over 3200 videos from biology, chemistry, physics, finance, history and humanities. • Each video is about 10 min long and there are interactive exercises and individualize statistics. • Completely free.
  23. 23. Khmer video lectures
  24. 24. Re-use what exists
  25. 25. BSI school • We are replicating what was done at PIO school at the demonstration school & improving on it. • We are extending it to include other subjects and different learner ages (secondary school). • We are involving more students. • We are considering how we can provide teaching resources to teachers using the tablets.
  26. 26. Where to from here? • First version of a new prototype. • Khmer video lectures. • Increase engagement and personalisation. • Integrate non-cognitive skills. • More pilots like with the demonstration school. • Find suitable funding models
  27. 27. But I being poor, have only my dreams; I have spread my dreams under your feet. Tread softly because you tread on my dreams.

Editor's Notes

  • Usual objections to mobile learning.Most are rooted in a belief that mobiles are not cost effective and do not produce real results.I hope I can change your mind about this.
  • As you all know there are a lot of needs.Developing world: low-cost, high quality learning at scale.Developed world: Cracking the culture of failure.We need significant innovations to meet these needs if we’re serious about solving the world’s educational challenges.
  • A diagram of the types of innovation in education. Most of the efforts are directed in the top left corner.Where mobile learning innovations can be.Every journey of a thousand steps begins with the first.he first cell points us to the most familiar category: sustaining innovation in formal learning, such as schools and colleges. The school improvement agenda pursued by governments around the world—to get more children into better schools, with better teachers, facilities and equipment—fits into this category.Moving to the right brings us to sustaining innovation in informal learning—that is, outside school,at home, and in the community. This quadrant is attracting growing attention from policymakers. Family and community exert a profound influence on attitudes to and capabilities for learning. In deprived communities, children often have to overcome considerable social and emotional barriers to learning, in addition to facing economic and material constraints. Innovation in this quadrant is focused on working in communities, with families and parents, to enable more children to make more of school.The third cell is disruptive innovation in formal learning—the mandate to reinvent school. Reinvented schools might have teachers, assessments, and classes, but they are radically different from the traditional school in a number of ways:• They have personalized timetables.• Assessment in this setting often does not involve traditional exams..• Classes are organized by ability and interest rather than age.• There is more peer-to-peer teaching and learning.Disaffection with school, evident in high dropout rates and exam failure, suggests there is a pent-up demand for a different kind of school experience—an experience that is more engaging, rewarding and relevant to the skills people will need in the century to come. Governments and educational entrepreneurs around the world are making growing investments in this area to create schools fit for the 21st century.The bottom right-hand cell is disruptive innovation in informal learning outside school: not alternative types of school but alternatives to school, which make learning available without a school structure, classroom, teacher, timetable, or exam. Most of Hole in the Wall’s activities fit in this category.
  • It’s not my idea at all.If you’re not prepared to be wrong you’ll never come up with something original.traditional schools are designed for an era when most jobs were in hierarchical, industrial-era corporations that needed compliant, punctual, diligent workers who were good at following written instructions. Education tailored to the needs of mass production industry is out of kilter with the times. The spread of the web, particularly through mobile phones, will allow more people than ever to access information, knowledge, and advice from skilled teachers and their peers, to participate in discussion, and to learn by their own discovery and through playing games. We have only just begun to explore how the web might be used to promote learning. Some of the most telling lessons in transformational, radical innovation will come from the bottom of the pyramid, not the top. That is why our research has focused on social entrepreneurs working in extreme social conditions in slums and informal settlements in developing-world cities.
  • The hardware and infrastructure we see now will change incredibly rapidly in the coming years – offering new opportunities we can only dream of presently.Do you remember your first cell phone? How long ago was that? What did that look like? What do you use now?
  • 13 million Cambodians, or 87% of the population in own a mobile.Compare that to 2% internet subscriber rate.With this group comes the change it brings. Here’s a taste of the fast changing world we live in. sure it’s more relevant to us in Aus but this I argue is even more reason why we need to change the way we educate Cambodian kids.
  • Sure this may not be as big a deal in Aus as it is in Cambodia, but I don’t’ think that argument holds.We’re an incredibly globalised economy. If we want the kids we teach to be leaders today, we need to teach differently. If we believe kids deserve our best,
  • In this context information retention doesn’t matter nearly as much as CREATIVITY
  • Well if technology is changing our world, technology can help us keep pace.
  • Highlight two words.Culture where we accept experimentation and remove stigma of failure. Technology assisted models that can be replicated and scaled elsewhere. KAPE has a history of that with the low power computer labs.Now we’re going to try to do this with Grit.Mobile devices can ultimately offer even greater opportunities. Currently yes there are challenges with the access but that’s where the experimentation comes in.
  • Content can be math, english, science or even teacher resources.
  • Test scores.From fail to pass.
  • Didn’t want to touch the tablets at all. But quickly got over it.
  • Demonstrate the creation of a video.
  • What we’ve talked about today can heavily influence and affect the many dreams of the children in Cambodia.

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