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Innovation District
Vision
The vision for the Innovation District
you are about to see will be forever
evolving.
Our goal is to successfully execute
...
The first 100 years of our country's history
were about who could build the biggest,
most efficient farms.
The second 100 ...
Our
urgency
Our people
… results in excess
patent growth of
approximately 9%.
Innovation comes from smart
people working together.
A 1...
Our nation’s scarcest resource is and will be our vibrant human capital,
particularly young minds. Boston’s ability to com...
1,000 Acres
“A new approach is called for on the waterfront – one that is both more
deliberate and more experimental...
- ...
Total available SF 3,384,602
Industrial 914,156
Office 1,872,878
Flex 572,568
Hospitality 25,000
Our space
Illustration an...
Our
businesses
Imagine a place…
… where an entrepreneur creates a new product while drinking coffee with a
friend from the nearby univers...
Live
build flexible housing options to
work for flexible lifestyles
Play
provide public space &
programming to foster an
i...
Where
innovators
work, play
and live in
Boston
Why create create
clusters of
innovative people?
The best ideas are shared, created quickly and happen in close places
People proximately located share technologies and kn...
More jobs
Large firms have access to customers and plenty of money, but are best
suited to produce expensive products that...
VCs concentrate where the ideas are.
Clusters provide an efficient marketplace where ideas are generated, VCs are
and want...
Why build flexible
housing options to work
for flexible lifestyles?
A luxury they can’t afford
Many innovators cannot afford traditional housing options
Entrepreneurial housing opportunities...
Different lifestyles
We must “continue to develop [Boston’s] urban vitality, ensuring that it is the
kind of place that pe...
Why provide
public space and
programming to
foster an
innovation
ecosystem?
9am-5pm to 24/7
Today’s entrepreneurs do not work nine to five—they work intensely and
erratically. Much of the entreprene...
Core
Principles
Shared Innovation
Create opportunities for all
Livability
Move beyond meeting
environmental standardsUrban...
Urban lab
Learn from what doesn’t work, implement what does, and scale the best
Those cities that are best able to adapt t...
Move beyond meeting environmental standards toward livability
Better ventilation, lighting and general environment result ...
Shared Innovation
For sustainable growth, there must be opportunities for all
For the Innovation District to be relevant f...
SLIDE 3
Seth Godin. Fast Company Unleash Your Ideavirus July 31, 2000
SLIDE 5
Edward L. Glaeser and Albert Saiz, “Rise of ...
Boston Innovation District Vision 2010
Boston Innovation District Vision 2010
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Boston Innovation District Vision 2010

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Original Vision document from August 2010.
Prepared by Andrew Feinberg, Mitch Weiss, and Sam Hammar. Designed by Jessica Lord.

Published in: Government & Nonprofit
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Boston Innovation District Vision 2010

  1. 1. Innovation District Vision
  2. 2. The vision for the Innovation District you are about to see will be forever evolving. Our goal is to successfully execute key projects over the next four years to set the vision for the future of the District. We want to ensure that the momentum we all build is sustainable and stays on course until completion.
  3. 3. The first 100 years of our country's history were about who could build the biggest, most efficient farms. The second 100 years were about the race to build efficient factories. Welcome to the third century: This one's about ideas. -Seth Godin Our motivation
  4. 4. Our urgency
  5. 5. Our people … results in excess patent growth of approximately 9%. Innovation comes from smart people working together. A 10% percent increase in college graduates who are retained in a given location… 40.3% of Bostonians hold Bachelor degrees Over 80 metro-Boston colleges are educating 330,874 higher education students annually And graduating 22,198 Master’s Degrees and 2,836 Doctoral Degrees each year.
  6. 6. Our nation’s scarcest resource is and will be our vibrant human capital, particularly young minds. Boston’s ability to compete for our best minds is the key to our success. To capture their ideas, we must capture their minds Otherwise, they will… cure cancer develop new modes of transportation solve the world’s problems …elsewhere Our people
  7. 7. 1,000 Acres “A new approach is called for on the waterfront – one that is both more deliberate and more experimental... - Mayor Thomas M. Menino The massive expanse of the South Boston waterfront, with its existing knowledge base, opportunity for growth, and world-class infrastructure is ripe to produce world-class products and services” Our place
  8. 8. Total available SF 3,384,602 Industrial 914,156 Office 1,872,878 Flex 572,568 Hospitality 25,000 Our space Illustration and not drawn to scale
  9. 9. Our businesses
  10. 10. Imagine a place… … where an entrepreneur creates a new product while drinking coffee with a friend from the nearby university. After developing her vision with the help of local talent, the venture capitalist across the street fund’s her vision, allowing it to become a reality. In collaboration with the anchor firm down the street, that product is scaled and changes the face of the industry… Our place
  11. 11. Live build flexible housing options to work for flexible lifestyles Play provide public space & programming to foster an innovation ecosystem Work create clusters of innovative people new jobs new businesses new patents new policies new ways of living Our plan Our goals
  12. 12. Where innovators work, play and live in Boston
  13. 13. Why create create clusters of innovative people?
  14. 14. The best ideas are shared, created quickly and happen in close places People proximately located share technologies and knowledge more easily, and implement innovations more rapidly. And because most ideas are born from existing products rather than from ether, people in clusters innovate at a quicker rate. In fact, innovators cite other patents in their own creations at a 8.8% higher rate than those created elsewhere. More ideas, quicker
  15. 15. More jobs Large firms have access to customers and plenty of money, but are best suited to produce expensive products that do not always meet the customers needs… Small firms have plenty of great ideas, but do not have access to capital or customers Placing small and large companies together results in a sustaining, symbiotic relationship that feeds innovation. Clusters support small companies, which create more jobs An increase in the number of small businesses is the best driver of job growth.
  16. 16. VCs concentrate where the ideas are. Clusters provide an efficient marketplace where ideas are generated, VCs are and want other VCs want to be… VCs help great ideas become great products by providing more than just capital: Monitoring Management Team Coaching Introductions to key Partners More money Most VC money flows to innovation clusters Start-ups are even more likely to get funded in those cities
  17. 17. Why build flexible housing options to work for flexible lifestyles?
  18. 18. A luxury they can’t afford Many innovators cannot afford traditional housing options Entrepreneurial housing opportunities are necessary to support early-stage entrepreneurs in all sectors. Without low-cost accommodations, we will not retain the brightest minds.
  19. 19. Different lifestyles We must “continue to develop [Boston’s] urban vitality, ensuring that it is the kind of place that people from across the country, and around the world, want to live” and offer a complete suite of options. For the entrepreneur who is never at home because she’s at the lab all night or developing a new program with her co-founders, an apartment near the office would be a great solution. Entrepreneurs are constantly moving. Gaining access to housing comes at the cost of losing the flexibility entrepreneurial lifestyles require.
  20. 20. Why provide public space and programming to foster an innovation ecosystem?
  21. 21. 9am-5pm to 24/7 Today’s entrepreneurs do not work nine to five—they work intensely and erratically. Much of the entrepreneur’s “work” is done outside of the office. In fact, creative workers spend as much as half of their work schedule out of their offices. Whether grabbing a drink or dinner, going for a run, or relaxing in the park, these knowledge workers are constantly exchanging information and examining collaboration opportunities. An abundance of collaborative venues and open spaces is critical to fostering the creative process. Innovators are redefining the term “day job”
  22. 22. Core Principles Shared Innovation Create opportunities for all Livability Move beyond meeting environmental standardsUrban Lab Learn from what doesn’t work, implement what does, and scale the best new jobs new businesses new patents new policies new ways of living Our Goals
  23. 23. Urban lab Learn from what doesn’t work, implement what does, and scale the best Those cities that are best able to adapt to changing conditions are the ones that thrive. Given that more educated people better adapt to a changing environment, Boston’s highly educated workforce is perfectly suited to lead us in the 21st century. 1 This experiment concentrates rapid prototyping and quicker iterations, allowing our innovators to find the right answers, quicker. The Innovation District, a concentration of talent and ideas, will harvest key lessons for the city and where relevant, apply them.
  24. 24. Move beyond meeting environmental standards toward livability Better ventilation, lighting and general environment result in increased productivity from less sick time and greater worker productivity and increase the value of real estate from $37 to $55 dollars per square foot. We are well placed to lead the world in coastal zone climate change mitigation and adaptation. We will test urgent methods and share key practices, while creating a market for successful technologies and products. Toward livability
  25. 25. Shared Innovation For sustainable growth, there must be opportunities for all For the Innovation District to be relevant for our entire City, the lessons must, in part, be relevant to all people. We believe that the innovation economy provides new opportunities to people of all backgrounds and education levels. One does not need a Ph.D., lab or computer to develop new products and processes for the 21st century. We welcome the newest construction techniques, baking recipes, and craftspeople, all of which will help create to the Innovation District.
  26. 26. SLIDE 3 Seth Godin. Fast Company Unleash Your Ideavirus July 31, 2000 SLIDE 5 Edward L. Glaeser and Albert Saiz, “Rise of the Skilled City,” Harvard Institute of Economic Research Discussion Paper, 2025 (December 2003): 38-9 SLIDE 6 The Boston Consulting Group for The Boston Foundation, “Preventing a Brain Drain: Talent retention in Greater Boston?,” (October 2003): 5 MORE IDEAS, QUICKER Edward L . Glaeser and William R. Kerr, “Local Industrial Conditions and Entrepreneurship: How Much of the Spatial Distribution Can We Explain?,” Journal of Economics & Management Strategy 18, No. 3 (Fall 2009). Adam B. Jaffee and Manuel Trajtenberg and Rebecca Henderson, “Geographic Localization of Knowledge Spillovers As Evidenced by Patent Citations,” The Quarterly Journal of Economics (August 1993):594-5. MORE JOBS Henry Chen, Paul Gompers, Anna Kovner and Josh Lerner, “Buy Local? The Geography of successful and Unsuccessful Venture Capital Expansion,” Harvard Business School Working Paper 09-143 (June 2009): 2. Henry Chen, Paul Gompers, Anna Kovner and Josh Lerner, “Buy Local? The Geography of successful and Unsuccessful Venture Capital Expansion,” Harvard Business School Working Paper 09-143 (June 2009): 16. (in relation to their local combined statistical area) Henry Chen, Paul Gompers, Anna Kovner and Josh Lerner, “Buy Local? The Geography of successful and Unsuccessful Venture Capital Expansion,” Harvard Business School Working Paper 09-143 (June 2009): 20-21. Edward Glaeser and William Kerr, “What Makes A City Entrepreneurial?,” Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston and Taubman Center for State and Local Government, Policy Briefs (Febrauary, 2010), 3. MORE MONEY Henry Chen, Paul Gompers, Anna Kovner and Josh Lerner, “Buy Local? The Geography of successful and Unsuccessful Venture Capital Expansion,” Harvard Business School Working Paper 09-143 (June 2009. LUXURY CAN’T AFFORD Entry Level Data, provided by Salary.com DIFFERENT NEEDS Edward Glaeser and William Kerr, “What Makes A City Entrepreneurial?,” Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston and Taubman Center for State and Local Government, Policy Briefs (Febrauary, 2010), 3. Edward L. Glaeser and Albert Saiz, “Rise of the Skilled City,” Harvard Institute of Economic Research Discussion Paper, 2025 (December 2003): 25. The difference in numbers is is a result of controlling for the initial house price in each community. NINE TO FIVE “Why Office Design Matters,” HBS Working Knowledge, 9/12/2005 URBAN EXPERIMENT Edward L. Glaeser and Albert Saiz, “Rise of the Skilled City,” Harvard Institute of Economic Research Discussion Paper, 2025 (December 2003): 1-2. Research

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