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Public Policy Guide
2015As Utah’s business leader, we stand as the voice of business, we support
our members’ success and ...
STATEMENT ON CIVILITY
The Salt Lake Chamber believes civility must be
a guiding value in public discourse. We commit
ourse...
S A LT L A K E C H A M B E R P U B L I C P O L I C Y G U I D E
1
Dear Fellow Utahns,
Around the country, people are asking...
S A LT L A K E C H A M B E R P U B L I C P O L I C Y G U I D E
2
The Economic
Imperative for Action
Utah begins 2015 with ...
Growth pressures
Utah is also a growth state. Our
population will increase 60 percent by
2050 and all of this growth requi...
“The biggest burdens on
business today are complex
regulations and a cumbersome
tax code. Make business simpler
and the ec...
BUSINESS CLIMATE, TAXES AND REGULATION STATEMENT OF PRINCIPLES
n	 Ingredients for success – We believe low taxes, effectiv...
BusinessClimate,TaxesandRegulation
2015 BUSINESS CLIMATE, TAXES AND REGULATION POLICY PRIORITIES
n	 Comprehensive tax refo...
S A LT L A K E C H A M B E R P U B L I C P O L I C Y G U I D E
7
“Utah’s economy is thriving in
part because of our laser-like
focus on the economy. Our
commitment to economic
development...
ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT, JOBS AND GROWTH STATEMENT OF PRINCIPLES
n	 Free enterprise – We support America’s free enterprise sy...
EconomicDevelopment,JobsandGrowth
ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT, JOBS AND GROWTH POLICY POSITIONS (Continued)
n	 Building Utah’s im...
S A LT L A K E C H A M B E R P U B L I C P O L I C Y G U I D E
11
n	 Innovation district – Utah’s dynamic economy requires...
“Never before has the business
community been so unified in
its approach to improving Utah’s
education. We look forward to...
EDUCATION STATEMENT OF PRINCIPLES
n	 Innovation, accountability and investment – We stand with Gov. Gary R. Herbert
and th...
2015 EDUCATION PUBLIC POLICY PRIORITIES (Continued)
v	 Superior math instruction – We support
expanded math endorsements a...
WORKFORCE AND HEALTH CARE STATEMENT OF PRINCIPLES
n	 Beehive State – We believe that supporting and
strengthening Utah's w...
“Investment in our transportation
infrastructure matters. Substantive
action this year to address the needs
of the Unified...
INFRASTRUCTURE AND TRANSPORTATION STATEMENT OF PRINCIPLES
n	 Economic prosperity – We believe that a safe and efficient tr...
InfrastructureandTransportation
2015 POLICY PRIORITIES: TRANSPORTATION AND INFRASTRUCTURE
n	 Comprehensive transportation ...
S A LT L A K E C H A M B E R P U B L I C P O L I C Y G U I D E
19
2015 POLICY PRIORITIES: WATER INFRASTRUCTURE
n	 State wa...
“Utah’s natural environment is
truly an asset. We must make
every effort to preserve and
enhance that asset, while also
st...
NATURAL RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENT STATEMENT OF PRINCIPLES
n	 Balance economic interests – We champion Utah’s spectacular n...
NaturalResourcesandEnvironment
NATURAL RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENT POLICY POSITIONS (Continued)
n	 National and state parks ...
2015 OUTDOOR RECREATION AND TOURISM POLICY PRIORITIES
n	 Outdoor and tourism industry – We support
fostering accelerated g...
S A LT L A K E C H A M B E R P U B L I C P O L I C Y G U I D E
24
Business Champions
As a statewide chamber with members i...
S A LT L A K E C H A M B E R P U B L I C P O L I C Y G U I D E
25
Task Force Membership
As the voice of business, the Salt...
TaskForceMembership
World Trade Center Utah Board of Directors
Founding Members:
President & CEO: Derek Miller, World
Trad...
S A LT L A K E C H A M B E R P U B L I C P O L I C Y G U I D E
27
Immigration Task Force
Chair: Timothy Wheelwright, Durha...
TaskForceMembership
S A LT L A K E C H A M B E R P U B L I C P O L I C Y G U I D E
28
Natural Resources Business Council
C...
S A LT L A K E C H A M B E R P U B L I C P O L I C Y G U I D E
29
Capitol Club
Chair: Dan Harbeke, Union Pacific Railroad
...
The Salt Lake Chamber Board of Governors recognizes and appreciates the Chamber staff for its dedication and professionali...
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2015 public policy guide

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The Salt Lake Chamber's 2015 Public Policy Guide outlines the business community's policy priorities for the 2015 legislative session and calendar year.

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2015 public policy guide

  1. 1. Public Policy Guide 2015As Utah’s business leader, we stand as the voice of business, we support our members’ success and we champion community prosperity.
  2. 2. STATEMENT ON CIVILITY The Salt Lake Chamber believes civility must be a guiding value in public discourse. We commit ourselves to respectful discourse in the public square and pledge to do our part to promote civil society. “We invite elected officials, community leaders, members of the media and all Utahns to join us in advancing polite and civil discourse. I have no doubt that our public policies will be better if we develop them with civility.” — Lane Beattie, President and CEO, Salt Lake Chamber The Salt Lake Chamber is a statewide chamber of commerce representing more than 8,000 businesses, which employ more than half the workforce of our state. We are a capital city chamber with a statewide mission and reach. The Chamber works as Utah’s business leader to stand as the voice of business, support our members’ success and champion community prosperity. More than 8,000businesses represented More than 500,000employees represented Members in 29counties S T A N D S U P P O R T C H A M P I O N Cover Photo: Evan Rowell Introduction 1 Business Climate, Taxes and Regulation 5 Economic Development, Jobs and Growth 9 Education, Workforce and Health Care 13 Infrastructure and Transportation 17 Natural Resources and Environment 21 Business Champions 24 Task Force Membership 25
  3. 3. S A LT L A K E C H A M B E R P U B L I C P O L I C Y G U I D E 1 Dear Fellow Utahns, Around the country, people are asking—what is Utah’s secret to success? Once simply a small interior western state, we now lead the national recovery as a global business destination with unparalleled life quality. We stand on the shoulders of past forward-thinking trailblazers who demonstrated economic leadership. These leaders emphasized fiscal discipline, created an attractive tax climate, and invested in a talented workforce and top-notch infrastructure. All of this has been driven by a commitment to future community prosperity. That is our secret to success. Today, the economic fundamentals that powered our recovery need renewed attention and investment to meet future growth. Clear warning signs in educational achievement and needs in our transportation infrastructure require investment now. We must also address our future tax structure, clean our air and continue to grow our economy as we focus on future success. Community prosperity is a commitment to our future. It is a commitment to our children and grandchildren that they will inherit a stronger, safer and more prosperous Utah. We must build upon our current economic strength recognizing that leadership is doing more than what is expected. We will lead the Utah way. The 2015 Public Policy Guide outlines the business community’s principles, positions and priorities. This publication embodies our mission: to stand as the voice of business, to support our members’ success and to champion community prosperity. The steady hand of business leadership and collaboration with federal, state and local policymakers have helped make Utah what it is today. As Utah’s business leader, the Salt Lake Chamber believes now is the time to focus on fundamentals. To invest. To go beyond the politically expedient and to do more than what is expected. To exhibit lasting economic leadership and to prosper. We invite you to join us in taking advantage of this opportunity. Lane Beattie Terry Buckner President and CEO Chair
  4. 4. S A LT L A K E C H A M B E R P U B L I C P O L I C Y G U I D E 2 The Economic Imperative for Action Utah begins 2015 with significant economic momentum. Utah’s economy is the envy of the nation. Job growth ranks among the top states in the country, every major industry is growing and unemployment is at a six-year low. The business focus of Gov. Herbert and the Legislature has propelled Utah through the Great Recession and positioned the state extremely well for 2015. Thanks to a strong economy, we now have the resources to invest in our future. EDUCATIONWARNING SIGNS Falling behind Utah’s students are losing ground nationally and rank poorly among states with similar income, parent’s education and ethnic diversity. Source: 2009 American Community Survey Source: U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey Source: Utah Foundation, National Assessment of Educational Progress Now more than ever, education is the surest path to economic success. Unfortunately, we are seeing advanced warning signs in Utah of educational achievement. Among peer states, Utah’s test scores in math and reading for fourth and eighth graders are at the back of the pack. Completion rates for young adults are lower than their parents.  Utah women have lost their edge compared to national averages in completing their college degree. And Utah’s investment in education relative to our ability to pay has fallen from 7th best in the country in 1995 to 31st today. These trends will continue at our economic peril. $60 - $50 - $40 - $30 - $20 - $10 - 0 - 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 8 9 8 7 11 11 12 16 17 19 20 29 25 22 32 33 24 26 29 32 31 National Rank Women in the workplace In the last decade, fewer Utah women are completing college, leaving them under-qualified to lead Utah's future. UtahFemale NationalFemale 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 1960 1980 2000 2012 College completion declining In the last two decades, Utah has lost the advantage it once held of being among the most highly- educated states in the nation. 25-34 35-44 45-64 65 plus 32%- 30%- 28%- 26%- 24%- 22%- 29.3% 31.5% 30.5% 26.4% Age Cohort 4th Grade Reading Scores In 20118th Grade MathTest Scores In 2011 U.S. Average U.S. Average Source: Utah State Office of Education, Utah Governor’s Budget Summaries. Calculations by Utah Foundation PercentofUtahnswithBachelor’sDegree PercentofWomen25andOlderwithaBachelor’sDegree Investment in education Utah was once a leader in education investment, but now is 31st among states in public education spending per $1,000 of personal income.
  5. 5. Growth pressures Utah is also a growth state. Our population will increase 60 percent by 2050 and all of this growth requires investment in transportation, water and utility infrastructure. We have a structural imbalance in how we pay for transportation investment because Utah’s motor fuel tax has lost nearly 50 percent of its purchasing power since 1997. We must begin to meet the challenges of our roads, bridges, water lines, utility lines and public transit, which all require investment if Utah’s economy is going to thrive. S A LT L A K E C H A M B E R P U B L I C P O L I C Y G U I D E 3 State revenue growth The consensus revenue forecast for state government in fiscal year 2016 includes $313 million in new one-time funds (including $112 million from the fiscal year 2014 surplus) and $325 million in new available ongoing unrestricted General Fund and Education Fund revenue. This sizable revenue growth provides an opportunity for state government to address critical investment needs in people and in infrastructure. 2015 is a time to invest. Investment Investment requires sacrifice. Today we stand on the shoulders of forward-thinking leaders who built Utah’s strong and diverse economy. They made smart decisions like investing in the 2002 Olympic Winter Games, doubling the number of engineers graduating from our universities, rebuilding our State Capitol, and investing in public transit and roads. This same opportunity to exhibit lasting economic leadership exists for today’s leaders. And nowhere is this investment more important than in public and higher education. Urbanization Utah is increasingly becoming more urban and is already among the most urban states in the nation. 91%of Utah's population lives in urban areas Population growth A growing economy requires investment in human and physical capital. 60%increase in population by 2050 Utah’s business leaders believe now is the time to invest in Utah’s future. We don’t believe in hunkering down during the good times. We believe in investing in a prosperous future. We call it the 2015 Opportunity for Economic Leadership. Business knows when to invest We must continue our commitment to invest in Utah’s transportation system. We must keep our competitive advantage in transportation. 2 We must maintain an attractive tax climate. Addressing today’s critical needs must be met with a concerted effort in the coming years to modernize and improve Utah’s tax structure. 3 Following each of these guiding principles requires leadership. It’s easy to be an advocate for one and neglect the others. But that’s not leadership. Leadership is navigating change and creating a better tomorrow. We have the opportunity to invest in Utah’s future economy this year, if we only have the will to do it. We must make a landmark ongoing investment in Utah’s future workforce. We ignore clear education warning signs at our peril. We can invest now or pay a dear price later. 1 As a business community we have adopted the following guiding principles to guide public policy decisions in 2015: Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Consumer Price Index, Calculations by Salt Lake Chamber Source: Utah Governor's Office of Management and Budget Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Utah Foundation Buying power hit by inflation Utah's future growth relies upon a transportation infrastructure that current funding mechanisms no longer adequately support. 48%loss in purchasing power of the 24.5 cent-per- gallon motor-fuel tax
  6. 6. “The biggest burdens on business today are complex regulations and a cumbersome tax code. Make business simpler and the economy will thrive.” Lori Chillingworth, Executive Vice President, Small Business Division, Zions Bank Vice Chair, Salt Lake Chamber
  7. 7. BUSINESS CLIMATE, TAXES AND REGULATION STATEMENT OF PRINCIPLES n Ingredients for success – We believe low taxes, effective regulations, top-notch infrastructure, a talented workforce, and a well-managed and limited government create the environment for economic success. BUSINESS CLIMATE, TAXES AND REGULATION POLICY POSITIONS n Tax policy – We support tax policies that strengthen Utah’s economy, and properly balance tax simplicity, efficiency, fairness, revenue sufficiency and transparency. n Regulation – We support regulations that encourage capital investment, remove uncertainty, improve transparency, reduce the burden on business and protect the public and the environment. n No general tax increase – We oppose increases in income, sales or property taxes that are not supported by the public. The State of Utah should ensure that transportation user fees are increased and adjusted to preserve purchasing power to meet critical mobility needs. n Collection of remote sales and use taxes – We support a simplified regulatory framework under which remote sellers collect and remit taxes already owed by individual buyers to the state. We believe Congress should enact federal legislation which provides for fairness and certainty in the marketplace as well as ease of compliance for remote sellers. The Chamber’s full statement of principles is available at www.slchamber.com n Alcohol regulation – We support the regulation of alcohol, which satisfies public demand, ensures public safety, discourages underage drinking, and supports a welcoming and hospitable climate for tourism and business recruitment efforts. Business Climate, Taxes and Regulation S A LT L A K E C H A M B E R P U B L I C P O L I C Y G U I D E 5 Utah's tax climate is among the top in the nation. Utah received the top spot for regulations affecting small business in the nation. Source: ThumbtackSource: Tax Foundation Utah remains one of the best states for business with its pro-business climate. Source: Forbes
  8. 8. BusinessClimate,TaxesandRegulation 2015 BUSINESS CLIMATE, TAXES AND REGULATION POLICY PRIORITIES n Comprehensive tax reform and fiscal flexibility – Federal and state tax reform must be addressed. We will work actively with elected leaders to find the best process, approach and options for meaningful tax reform, including a complete review of all existing taxes and fees, while preserving legislative flexibility for future appropriations. n Regulation reform – Regulation has an important role in our economy, creating a level playing field for business while protecting public safety and the environment. A modern, balanced, transparent regulatory system gives businesses the confidence they need to hire, invest and innovate. We support local, state and federal regulatory reform efforts that reduce the regulatory burden on business, remove outdated or outmoded regulations and provide data-driven checks and balances. n Downtown development – We encourage policies and investments that support downtown Salt Lake City’s role as a vibrant and diverse residential and business community. This includes supporting the most efficient process, ordinances and business regulations that encourage economic development. n Statewide non-discrimination ordinance – We support a standardized statewide non-discrimination ordinance that protects against employment and housing discrimination while guaranteeing protections for religious liberty. n First Amendment rights – We support policy efforts to ensure individuals, businesses and organizations are not restricted in exercising First Amendment rights. n Repeal of the Federal Medical Device Tax – Medical device manufacturing companies play a vital role in Utah’s innovation economy. We support the repeal of the 2.3 percent medical device excise tax on gross revenue that was passed in the Affordable Care Act as it impedes American innovation that creates jobs and saves lives. S A LT L A K E C H A M B E R P U B L I C P O L I C Y G U I D E 6 Utah’s Model for the Nation: 2011 Business Regulation Review In 2011 under Gov. Gary R. Herbert's leadership, Utah conducted a lengthy review of regulation affecting business. Utah has been among the top states for business for several years, and this analysis of nearly 2,000 regulations representing 99 percent of Utah’s rules provides a proven framework for future regulation reform efforts. The review found: 48% of Utah’s rules substantially affect business. 54% of rules did not have clear justification for requirements and needed clarification. 368 changes to cut red tape, improve efficiency, update code and add certainty for business. Source: 2011 Business Regulation Review. Available at www.rules.utah.gov Represents nearly 1,000 companies Provides more than 27,000 jobs These jobs paid an average of $62,233 a year, or 146%of Utah average wages. Source: Governor's Office of Economic Development (GOED) Utah’s life sciences industry cluster
  9. 9. S A LT L A K E C H A M B E R P U B L I C P O L I C Y G U I D E 7
  10. 10. “Utah’s economy is thriving in part because of our laser-like focus on the economy. Our commitment to economic development has now given us the opportunity to invest in our future prosperity.” Gov. Gary R. Herbert State of Utah
  11. 11. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT, JOBS AND GROWTH STATEMENT OF PRINCIPLES n Free enterprise – We support America’s free enterprise system as the best way to grow the economy, stimulate innovation and create jobs. n Thriving community – We champion Utah’s enviable life quality and commitment to the greater good, including support for Utah’s major arts organizations. n Strategic partnerships – We create and sustain model partnerships with the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, the Governor’s Office of Economic Development (GOED), Economic Development Corporation of Utah (EDCUtah), World Trade Center Utah, the Downtown Alliance, Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses, Utah Small Business Coalition, the David Eccles School of Business, as well as chambers of commerce and business associations and other like-minded entities to drive economic development. n Utah’s future – We believe how we grow matters. Utah is facing unprecedented growth that will affect every facet of our community, economy and quality of life. We support the "Your Utah, Your Future," effort led by Gov. Herbert, Envision Utah and other key stakeholders in taking a long-term integrated approach to solving the challenges associated with growth. We invite Utahns to share their voice at www.envisionutah.org ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT, JOBS AND GROWTH POLICY POSITIONS n Lifeblood of the Utah economy – The majority of Utahns are employed by small businesses. We support funding for programs and the development and expansion of incubators, co-ops and business development centers that support small businesses and entrepreneurs, specifically for women, minorities and veterans, with quantifiable results. n Global perspective – The future growth of Utah’s exports and competitive advantages rely on global partnerships. We support public policy that encourages open markets and the full participation and empowerment of Utah businesses in the global marketplace. We also support efforts to grow Utah’s export base and attract foreign investment dollars through key partnerships, trade missions, the hosting of dignitaries and training on international trade opening markets. n Downtown development – A vibrant metropolitan center is an important economic engine. In partnership with the Downtown Alliance, we support investments and policies that reinforce downtown Salt Lake City’s position as a regional urban center for culture, commerce and entertainment. This includes the following major projects in the Central Business District: · 101 Tower · 111 South Main · Three and Three Un.commons · Liberty at Gateway · Broadway Park Lofts · Hyatt House Hotel · Courtyard by Marriott · Air Urban Center · The George S. and Dolores Doré Eccles Theater · Jessie Eccles Quinney Center for Dance · Capitol Theatre Renovation Economic Development, Jobs and Growth S A LT L A K E C H A M B E R P U B L I C P O L I C Y G U I D E 9 3% Utah’s job creation engine is powering our economy and is the envy of the nation, averaging 3 percent employment growth from 2011–2014. Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Utah Department of Workforce Services
  12. 12. EconomicDevelopment,JobsandGrowth ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT, JOBS AND GROWTH POLICY POSITIONS (Continued) n Building Utah’s image – Perceptions of Utah are an important component of our economic success. We support continued funding of Utah’s business marketing and global branding efforts, which will build Utah’s global brand and keep Utah“top of mind” as a place for businesses. We oppose unproductive “message bills”that detract from our state’s image. n High-tech industry incentives – We support tax incentives that enhance and grow Utah’s economy in critical areas such as life sciences, advanced manufacturing, software and IT development, aerospace and defense, logistics and distribution centers, energy development and financial services. 2015 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT, JOBS AND GROWTH POLICY PRIORITIES n Data-driven policy – We support strengthening resources for policy makers and the public to make informed decisions. n Downtown Rising – We support significant public private developments that enhance downtown’s place as the primary location for business, creativity and culture. n Homeless services – We support a regional approach for new resources and efforts to help service providers and their clients address issues of homelessness, panhandling and vagrancy. n Broadband – We support a public-private approach to expanding broadband access and infrastructure, enhancing reliability and increasing speed so Utah can remain a leader in economic development. n Rural economic development – We support rural economic development efforts and partners, specifically in regards to advancing infrastructure and growing export opportunities as rural communities and businesses play a vital role in Utah’s economy. n Unmanned systems – We support Utah’s efforts to build its unmanned systems industry, which presents a unique economic development opportunity to leverage existing strengths and further diversify our economy. n Regional headquarters – We pledge our best efforts to place an emphasis on attracting regional corporate headquarters in the coming years. n Military affairs – We work actively to strengthen the relationships between Utah’s military and defense communities and the broader business community, including championing efforts to support our service members, veterans and their families. n Sustain USTAR – We support the mission and continued funding of the Utah Science Technology and Research initiative as a critical component to continued economic growth. S A LT L A K E C H A M B E R P U B L I C P O L I C Y G U I D E 10 Number of Fortune 500 Companies inWestern United States 9 2 54 4 1 0 0 91 5 0 52 4 1 5 0 0 Source: Forbes 1st Place in technology concentration and economic dynamism 10% of all companies in Utah are tech companies 3rd Place of venture capital as a percentage of worker earnings Source: Milken Institute and CBRE Source: National Science Board and CBRE Source: 2014 New Economic Index and CBRE
  13. 13. S A LT L A K E C H A M B E R P U B L I C P O L I C Y G U I D E 11 n Innovation district – Utah’s dynamic economy requires new research and development facilities. We will work actively over the coming years with key partners to align economic, physical and collaboration assets to develop an innovation district in Salt Lake City. An innovation district will further Utah’s ability to grow jobs in ways that align with disruptive forces in the economy. What is an innovation district? v An area where leading-edge anchor institutions and companies cluster and connect with start-ups, business incubators and accelerators. v A physically compact, transit-accessible and technically-wired, mixed-use housing, office and retail spaces. v A distinctly urban environment that fosters ingenuity, collaboration and proximity not found in the traditional suburban office model.
  14. 14. “Never before has the business community been so unified in its approach to improving Utah’s education. We look forward to working with the governor and Legislature in implementing key strategic investments to move education forward.” Alan Hall, Founder and Managing Director of Mercato Partners Chair, Prosperity 2020
  15. 15. EDUCATION STATEMENT OF PRINCIPLES n Innovation, accountability and investment – We stand with Gov. Gary R. Herbert and the Utah Legislature in supporting a long-term plan for education. We believe the recommendations below will return Utah to a top-10 state in overall education within the next decade. EDUCATION PUBLIC POLICY POSITIONS n Funding growth – We support the funding of enrollment growth every year. n Parental and family engagement – We support education policies that recognize the importance of family involvement and that encourage parental participation. 2015 EDUCATION PUBLIC POLICY PRIORITIES n Initiatives to improve Utah students’reading and language skills – School success and college and career readiness begin with the ability to read at a high level of proficiency. We must continue to focus on reading achievement, along with high standards and accountability through rigorous assessment. v K–3 target reading curricula and support – We support results-based funding for expanded early intervention reading programs. v Improving instruction – We support the development of professional learning communities in elementary schools. v Ready to learn – We support increased voluntary pre-school, community schools and other innovative public-private partnerships to support school readiness and success for at-risk students. v Expanding voluntary full-day kindergarten – We support increasing full-day kindergarten classes for all families. n Initiatives to improve Utah students’math and analytical skills – Investment in technology devices and technology-based assessments to ensure that Utah will increase the number of residents completing college, especially STEM majors, to qualify themselves for high-skill, high-wage jobs. v Improve K–3 classrooms – We support innovation in the classroom through expanded access to technology devices. v Assessing success – We support increased technology-based math assessment tools in grades K–8. Education, Workforce and Health Care S A LT L A K E C H A M B E R P U B L I C P O L I C Y G U I D E 13 The Salt Lake Chamber and Prosperity 2020 acknowledges and thanks the efforts of our strategic partner, Education First, in advocating for education excellence. Source: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics Prosperitythrough Education:The five-year plan to make Utah a top-10 state in education Download the full plan at www.educationfirstutah.org 4th and 8th Grade 2013 Reading Ranking (NAEP) Goal Top 10 4th Grade 8th Grade 22nd 13th 4th and 8th Grade 2013 Math Ranking (NAEP) Goal Top 10 4th Grade 8th Grade 22nd 27th
  16. 16. 2015 EDUCATION PUBLIC POLICY PRIORITIES (Continued) v Superior math instruction – We support expanded math endorsements and technology training for teachers, as well as professional learning communities for math teachers in grades 4–8. We also support professional learning communities and professional development for math teachers in grades 9–12 and STEM endorsements for secondary math teachers. n Initiatives to improve Utah students’college readiness – Districts and schools must be accountable for improving high school graduation rates, ensuring students are guided and advised about class choices and post-high school options. v Expand access to critical guidance – We support additional middle and high school counselor and mentor positions as well as targeted professional development for counselors on issues related to college access and success. v Empower students – We support a middle and high school advocate, academic coach and tutor program. n Initiatives to improve instruction in Utah’s schools – Utah must develop and retain the most highly skilled public school teachers and administrators while measuring and rewarding superior instructional performance to improve overall education outcomes. v Quality instruction – We support improving professional training, development and com- pensation for Utah’s teachers. We also support increasing instruction programs and professional development priorities identified by Utah State Board of Education and local school districts. n Initiatives to increase college and postsecondary degree completion – Utah must invest in grant certificates and degrees to increase completion rates and properly prepare Utah’s future workforce. v Incentivizing success – We support instructional performance rewards for increasing graduation completion rates. v Supporting students – We support access and outreach initiatives to increase participation and competition rates of underserved students. v Meeting workforce needs – We support increasing certificate and degree programs that meet high-wage, high-demand workforce needs. n Initiatives to increase access and affordability of higher education – Innovative programs must direct investment to students that are properly preparing themselves for success in postsecondary education as they move through certificate and degree programs in a timely manner. v Outcome-based scholarships – We support increased funding for the increasing demand of scholarships that encourage students to prepare for college academically and financially by taking a core course of study and saving for college. v Improve access – We support expanded and new performance-based scholarships that specifically support lower income students. n Initiatives to strengthen Utah’s higher education system – Utah’s higher education compensation must be competitive in order to attract high-quality instructors and researchers. v Merit-based compensation – We support innovations to strengthen merit-based compensation practices and to improve instruction and research that reward exemplary instructors and researchers for achieving specific outcomes. We also support increased funding to support enhanced compensation to attract high-quality instructors and researchers. Education,WorkforceandHealthCare S A LT L A K E C H A M B E R P U B L I C P O L I C Y G U I D E 14 High School Graduation Goal Top 10 2012 Graduation Rate among States College Degrees Goal Top 10 2012 Degrees Percentage among States Bridging the Gap If we do not act today to invest in education and properly align our workforce, there will be an estimated 468,000 unfilled jobs by 2020. Jobs unfilled468,000 Sources: Georgetown University’s Center on Education and the Workforce, Utah Department of Workforce Services Source: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, U.S. Census Bureau, 2010-12 American Community Survey PUMS File 25th 18th
  17. 17. WORKFORCE AND HEALTH CARE STATEMENT OF PRINCIPLES n Beehive State – We believe that supporting and strengthening Utah's workforce enables our economy to thrive. n Health of Utahns – We believe a healthy workforce is neces- sary for a productive business community. We support reform that addresses the growing epidemic of obesity and lifestyle induced diseases, resulting in better health for Utahns. WORKFORCE AND HEALTH CARE POLICY POSITIONS n Health care reform based on market principles – We support reform that applies market principles to contain costs and improve health. Such reform includes increasing transparency of cost and quality, as well as fostering competition and providing incentives for patients, doctors, hospitals and insurers to utilize resourc- es in ways that lead to measurably better outcomes. n Health system reform – Health system reform is a dynamic and critical issue. The Health System Reform Business Bill of Rights and Responsibilities summarizes the Chamber’s position on health system reform and it is available at www.slchamber.com n The Utah Compact – We support the five principles articulated in the Utah Compact as our guiding principles for immigration reform. The full text of the compact is available at www.utahcompact.com n Mandatory electronic verification – We support a national electronic verification system for new employees that reduces the existing regulatory burden on businesses and includes national visa reform. We oppose revocation of business licenses as a penalty for non-compliance. 2015 WORKFORCE AND HEALTH CARE POLICY PRIORITIES n Workforce alignment – We support innovative efforts to strategically align the private and public sectors to attract and train a skilled and talented workforce. n Supporting and hiring our veterans – We support the reintegration of America’s service men and women back into our workforce through entrepreneurial opportunities for veterans. n Healthy Utah – We support the Governor’s Healthy Utah proposal as an alternative to Medicaid expansion that recognizes the necessity of balancing the financial resources of the state with the needs of Utahns. Our community is stronger when we provide access to health coverage for the poorest among us. This measured approach must include efforts to apply market principles, such as utilizing Medicaid dollars through the employer market or a health insurance exchange. n Autism treatment – Autism spectrum disorders impact all Utahns. We support informed action that helps address this very real problem. The cost of addressing these disorders should be shared by all Utahns and should not be financed through an insurance mandate. n Directly engage employers – We support continued and enhanced employer engagement in health care spending to control costs and increase quality. We will also continue to improve the Employer’s Toolbox, which has become a vital resource for employers, at www.slchamber.com n Avenue H – We support Utah’s small business health insurance marketplace as a significant option for meeting employer and employee needs for health insurance. n Action on immigration – Immigration is a federal issue. We call on our federal delegation to fix America’s broken immigration system and advance broad immigration reform that is consistent with the principles of the Utah Compact. S A LT L A K E C H A M B E R P U B L I C P O L I C Y G U I D E 15 Source: Kaiser Family Foundation Lowest health care costs in the nation #1
  18. 18. “Investment in our transportation infrastructure matters. Substantive action this year to address the needs of the Unified Transportation Plan is critical and will have a lasting impact on our future economic success.” David R. Golden, Executive Vice President, Wells Fargo Chair, Utah Transportation Coalition
  19. 19. INFRASTRUCTURE AND TRANSPORTATION STATEMENT OF PRINCIPLES n Economic prosperity – We believe that a safe and efficient transportation system, modern energy infrastructure and reliable supply of water are integral parts of the foundation for economic growth and improved life quality. As the state population is expected to increase 60 percent by 2040, we must ensure that our state’s infrastructure will be able to keep pace with population growth. n Core function of government – We believe that the creation and maintenance of infrastructure is a core responsibility of the government. Utah’s elected and appointed officials exhibit economic leadership through their continued commitment to infrastructure investment. n Technological innovation – We embrace technological advances and design innovations that enhance the efficiency and safety of our infrastructure, expand their scope, improve user satisfaction and protect Utah’s air quality. n Disciplined planning and investment – We believe because Utah has limited resources and robust growth, long-term planning and disciplined investment are required to meet our infrastructure needs. INFRASTRUCTURE AND TRANSPORTATION POLICY POSITIONS n Utah’s Unified Transportation Plan – This consensus plan is a model for the nation and is our guiding vision for transportation planning and investments. n User fees – Users should bear the primary responsibility for funding Utah’s infrastructure. Infrastructure and Transportation S A LT L A K E C H A M B E R P U B L I C P O L I C Y G U I D E 17 The UtahTransportation Coalition is a group of business and civic leaders working together to protect Utah's environment, improve the economy and preserve our quality of life through strategic transportation investments. Learn more at www.UtahTransportation.org Return on Investment For every $1.00 spent on Utah's UnifiedTransportation Plan, an estimated $1.94 is returned to the state in value. $1.94 Returned $1.00 Spent Source: Economic Development Research Group, Inc Impact ofTransportation Capacity No New Projects After 1995 Finish Current Projects Only Past investments in transportation have paid major dividends for our economy. If we do not continue to invest, we face a significant increase in future congestion, increased costs and ultimately a deteriorating business climate and quality of life. Source: Utah Department of Transportation TotalHoursofDelayPerDay 1,200,000- 1,000,000- 800,000- 600,000- 400,000- 200,000- 0- 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Implement 2040 Unified Plan
  20. 20. InfrastructureandTransportation 2015 POLICY PRIORITIES: TRANSPORTATION AND INFRASTRUCTURE n Comprehensive transportation funding action – We support a comprehensive transportation funding package that significantly addresses the funding gap identified in Utah’s Unified Transportation Plan. Specifically, user fees for transportation should be increased and reformed in innovative ways to regain and preserve purchasing power. n Meeting local transportation needs – Utah’s local roads are in critical need of maintenance. We support proposals as part of a comprehensive transportation funding package that meet this need, enhance overall transportation spending and address local road investments identified in Utah’s Unified Transportation Plan. n Investments in transit – Utah’s transit system is among the nation’s best when compared to communities of similar size. We support continued investments in public transit as part of a comprehensive transportation funding package to address growth and improve our air quality as identified in Utah’s Unified Transportation Plan. n Federal transportation funding – We support a sustainable, long-term solution to the federal transportation program that provides stable and predictable federal investment in Utah’s highways, public transportation and highway safety. n Downtown mobility and active transportation – We support future projects, such as a downtown streetcar and a direct TRAX connection between the airport and the University of Utah through downtown. We also support the thoughtful redesign of downtown wayfinding, additional expansion of the GREENbike | SLC Bike Share program and other active transportation investments. n Mountain transportation system – We support the Mountain Accord effort to explore transportation options in the Wasatch Mountains that increase accessibility, are a net-positive for the environment, encourage transit, enhance Utah’s global brand, and pass a rigorous environmental and local process. n Grand Boulevards – Great cities have great boulevards. We support improvements to revitalize the main arteries in and out of Utah’s capital city that enhance safety and improve the perception of our state. n Airport rebuild – We support the $1.8 billion Salt Lake International Airport terminal redevelopment that will be funded without any increases in taxes or state funds. Utah businesses should receive priority in the development of this project. n Improving safety – Employers understand that failing to buckle up harms others on Utah’s roads. We support a primary seat belt law that will protect operators and passengers in vehicles. S A LT L A K E C H A M B E R P U B L I C P O L I C Y G U I D E 18 Utah’s Motor FuelTax Has Not Increased Since 1997 24.5¢ 24.5¢ $117,600 163.4 $4.50 $169,000 286.9 $9.25 0%Increase 44%Increase 175%Increase 205%Increase 1997 1997 1997 19972013 2013 2013 2013 Motor FuelTax Median Home Price UDOT Const. Index Movie Ticket Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics, Bureau of Economic and Business Research, Utah Department of Transportation, calculations by Salt Lake Chamber Source: Utah Department of Transportation. O Preservation $1 Reconstruction $10 Rehabilitation $6 5 10 15 Years Very Poor RoadCondition/ MaintenanceCost Very Good 20 25 30 Financial Case for Highway Maintenance
  21. 21. S A LT L A K E C H A M B E R P U B L I C P O L I C Y G U I D E 19 2015 POLICY PRIORITIES: WATER INFRASTRUCTURE n State water strategy – We support the development of a comprehensive state water strategy to identify how to continue the legacy of meeting our long-term water needs, protect our current water resources and make disciplined investments. This includes a thorough discussion with all stakeholders about the advantages and disadvantages of how we pay the future investments in water infrastructure and how best to utilize user fees. 2015 POLICY PRIORITIES: ENERGY INFRASTRUCTURE n Accessing energy in the Uinta Basin – Investment and development of Utah’s Uinta Basin requires improvements to the area’s transportation and energy infrastructure. We support investments in the Uinta Basin that increases accessibility, improves safety, protects the environment and responds to rural needs. n Energy infrastructure – Abundant, affordable energy contributes directly to our quality of life and strengthens our economy. We support efforts to expand and modernize Utah’s energy infrastructure to take full advantage of existing and new sources of energy and prepare for Utah’s future growth. Additionally, rate setting should acknowledge the full cost of our energy infrastructure and distribution. STAGE 1: JULY 2014 Preconstruction: $3.5 Million STAGE 2: JANUARY 2016 Preconstruction: $8.8 Million South Parking: $20 Million Rental Facilities: $61 Million Central Plant: $17 Million STAGE 4: JUNE 2022 Apron/Paving: $47 Million Demolition: $93 Million S. Concourse East: $169 Million PROJECT TOTAL: $1.78 BILLION STAGE 3: MAY 2019 Central Plant: $50 Million Roadway: $48 Million S. Concourse West: $270 Million Terminal/Gateway: $410 Million Parking Garage: $168 Million $0 Monthly Expenditures ($ millions) $10 $20 $30 $40 2014 2015 2016 2018 2019 2020 2021 2017 2022 STAGE1STAGE2STAGE3STAGE4 STAGE 1: JULY 2014 Preconstruction: $3.5 Million STAGE 2: JANUARY 2016 Preconstruction: $8.8 Million South Parking: $20 Million Rental Facilities: $61 Million Central Plant: $17 Million STAGE 4: JUNE 2022 Apron/Paving: $47 Million Demolition: $93 Million S. Concourse East: $169 Million PROJECT TOTAL: $1.78 BILLION STAGE 3: MAY 2019 Central Plant: $50 Million Roadway: $48 Million S. Concourse West: $270 Million Terminal/Gateway: $410 Million Parking Garage: $168 Million $0 Monthly Expenditures ($ millions) $10 $20 $30 $40 2014 2015 2016 2018 2019 2020 2021 2017 2022 STAGE1STAGE2STAGE3STAGE4 Airport CompletionTimeline Source: Salt Lake International Airport and CBRE
  22. 22. “Utah’s natural environment is truly an asset. We must make every effort to preserve and enhance that asset, while also strengthening our business climate and quality of life.” Richard Walje, President and CEO of Gateway Projects, PacifiCorp Public Policy Chair, Salt Lake Chamber
  23. 23. NATURAL RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENT STATEMENT OF PRINCIPLES n Balance economic interests – We champion Utah’s spectacular natural environment as a legacy passed to us from preceding generations. It provides recreational opportunities and natural beauty that attracts great companies and employees. Our natural resources also keep our communities strong and are an essential part of many business processes. We must thoughtfully approach how we appropriately balance these economic interests. n Responsible development – We believe the responsible development, management and use of natural resources are a key driver and strength of Utah’s economy. These essential resources ensure access to a high standard of living and quality of life, create jobs and provide a solid foundation for broader economic strength. n Private sector solutions – We champion voluntary private sector initiatives to promote efficiency, sustainability and stewardship to improve our spectacular natural environment. n Personal responsibility – We recognize that businesses, citizens and government share the same natural environment. As Utah continues to grow, we must all commit to clean our air, conserve more water, promote responsible development and preserve first-rate access to Utah’s great outdoor recreation assets NATURAL RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENT POLICY POSITIONS n Greenhouse gas – Global warming requires global solutions. Any proposed federal regulation of greenhouse gases must be designed to prevent the transfer of economic wealth from Utah to other states or nations, minimize economic hardship on businesses and consumers, and allow for alternative means of compliance. n Nuclear – We support development of nuclear power if economically viable, including the assessment of economic risks and a policy for safely storing or reprocessing locally produced spent fuel. n Federal Air Quality Standards Compliance – We must carefully address air quality issues while minimizing the cost to business. Utah must meet current federal air quality standards. Without action, we may lose federal highway funding, garner additional regulatory burdens, and impair economic development and corporate recruitment. We remain actively engaged and supportive of the PM2.5 State Implementation Plan, and support the Tier 3 Vehicle Emissions and Fuel Standards Program. n Economic development – Our air quality and water supply have lasting implications on our state’s ability to retain and attract new businesses and employees. We view efforts to clean Utah’s air and judiciously utilize and wisely develop our water resources through the lens of economic development. Natural Resources and Environment S A LT L A K E C H A M B E R P U B L I C P O L I C Y G U I D E 21 Energy & Minerals Water CleanAir Outdo or Recreation & To urism Natural Resource Business Council
  24. 24. NaturalResourcesandEnvironment NATURAL RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENT POLICY POSITIONS (Continued) n National and state parks – Utah’s national and state parks attract millions of visitors annually and contribute to the economies of both urban and rural Utah. We support policy to enhance and promote these precious natural resources. n Public lands – Utah has vast public lands set aside to benefit future generations. We support efforts to responsibly manage Utah’s public lands and properly balance development and conservation. These efforts should be inclusive of all stakeholders and the public. 2015 CLEAN AIR POLICY PRIORITIES n Providing transportation options – Mobile emissions are a significant contributor to Utah’s air quality challenges. We support increased transportation funding to improve our transit system, active transportation and last mile options to reduce mobile emissions and eliminate idling on Utah’s roadways. We also invite members of the public to show their support at www.choices4cleanair.com n Cleaner vehicles and fuels – We support efforts to promote Tier 3 Vehicle Emissions and Fuel Standards Program, other alternative fuels and low-emission vehicles on Utah’s roads. We also support incentives to convert state, commercial and private sector fleets to cleaner vehicles, as well as the necessary fuel and support infrastructure for low emissions vehicles. n Public awareness and research – We support efforts to help Utah residents better understand the causes and effects of poor air, including funding research and promoting voluntary actions to improve air quality. n Small business focus – We support incentives that facilitate small business participation in emission reductions and minimize costs incurred as a result of further regulations. The Salt Lake Chamber has launched a private sector- led Inversion Mitigation Campaign, which in 2013 had 68 companies participate, representing nearly 70,000 employees. In partnership with UCAIR, the program asks companies to commit to doing more during the inversion season to improve air quality and is a model of voluntary practices. Learn more at www.cleanairchampion.com 2015 ENERGY AND MINERALS DEVELOPMENT POLICY PRIORITIES n Energy and mineral development – Utah’s vast and diverse energy and mineral resources ensure access to reasonably priced energy while creating jobs, supporting rural economic development and providing a solid foundation for broader economic strength. We support policies that encourage and facilitate appropriate energy and mineral production, and that preserve and strengthen Utah’s competitive advantages. n Energy efficiency – We will champion efforts to engage and educate businesses on energy efficiency and cost-effective energy options in partnership with the Governor’s Office of Energy Development and the wattsmart® program. n Public awareness and research – We support efforts to help Utah residents better understand the impact of energy and minerals on our economy, including funding improved research to promote innovation and efficiencies. S A LT L A K E C H A M B E R P U B L I C P O L I C Y G U I D E 22 Utah’s Energy Competitive Advantage 11th lowest Utah had the 11th lowest average electricity prices in the nation in 2013. Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA)
  25. 25. 2015 OUTDOOR RECREATION AND TOURISM POLICY PRIORITIES n Outdoor and tourism industry – We support fostering accelerated growth in the outdoor recreation and tourism sectors of our economy in collaboration with the Office of Outdoor Recreation, Office of Global Branding, Tourism and Film located in the Governor’s Office of Economic Development (GOED), the Economic Development Corporation of Utah (EDCUtah) and other key partners. n “Rourism”– We support the state’s effort to grow rural economies through enhanced recreation and tourism— a concept called "rourism." We also support efforts to promote improved outdoor recreation infrastructure and opportunities throughout Utah. n Accommodating visitors – We support policies that promote the growth of our state’s convention industries, and that create a more welcoming and inclusive nightlife experience for locals and visitors alike. n Life Elevated® – Utah is competing on a global stage for tourism, business and investment. We support additional funding to promote Utah’s natural beauty to attract tourism and businesses. We also support long-term efforts and commitments to expand Utah’s tourism marketing, including the Tourism Marketing Performance Fund (TMPF). 2015 WATER POLICY PRIORITIES n Water conservation – We support continued efforts in promoting water conservation. We strongly promote best practices and innovation in water utilization for businesses through the“Utah | Water is Your Business” and“Slow the Flow”initiatives. S A LT L A K E C H A M B E R P U B L I C P O L I C Y G U I D E 23 88% of Utahns agree that outdoor recreation is very important to them. Source: Utah Office of Outdoor Recreation $12.00- $10.00- $8.00- $6.00- $4.00- $2.00- 0- 0 10,000 20,000 30,000 40,000 50,000 Pricepergallon Gallons Denver Las Vegas Tuscon Phoenix Salt Lake City St. George Ogden Boise Water Rates of SelectedWestern Cities. Summer Rate Schedule Source: Utah Foundation 88%
  26. 26. S A LT L A K E C H A M B E R P U B L I C P O L I C Y G U I D E 24 Business Champions As a statewide chamber with members in each of Utah’s 29 counties, we are committed to standing as the voice of business, supporting our members’success and championing community prosperity. The Salt Lake Chamber honors legislators who support a pro- economy and pro-business agenda with the title of“Business Champion.” During the legislative session, the Salt Lake Chamber Executive Board will designate top priorities of the business community within this Policy Guide and other critical issues that arise to be considered on the legislative floor as“priority votes.” The designation of Business Champion is directly tied to a legislator’s voting record on priority votes issued that receive a floor vote in the Senate and the House. Senate 27/29 (93%) House 67/75 (91%) We deeply appreciate the tireless efforts of Utah's Legislature in making Utah the best state for business. We want to recognize the 2014 Business Champions that represented over 90 percent of the Legislature. “Our business community is organized, united and ready to work with our elected officials. We have a very pro-business governor and Legislature. That combination is rare, and it is the primary reason our economy is performing as well as it has.” Lane Beattie, former Utah State Senate President and current President and CEO of the Salt Lake Chamber “We are going to be crusaders about Utah’s future. We must leave our state better than we found it.” Speaker Greg Hughes, Utah House of Representatives “Utah has critical needs that we must act on today. Leadership requires we make hard decisions that benefit generations for years to come.” President Wayne Niederhauser, Utah State Senate
  27. 27. S A LT L A K E C H A M B E R P U B L I C P O L I C Y G U I D E 25 Task Force Membership As the voice of business, the Salt Lake Chamber develops policies and positions, and champions and advocates on major issues affecting Utah businesses. Key to this effort is the work of policy-related committees, subcommittees, task forces, and councils involving more than 850 representatives of member corporations, organizations, and the academic community who serve voluntarily. In almost every instance, significant policy and public issue positions originate with one of these Chamber components. Participation on a committee by a member is not explicit support for any one position. Utah Economic Council Public Co-Chair: Juliette Tennert, Governor’s Office of Management and Budget Private Co-Chair: Natalie Gochnour, Salt Lake Chamber Kjersten Adams, Cicero Group Chris Bray, Utah Nonprofits Association Wes Curtis , Southern Utah University Richard W. Evans, Brigham Young University John Gilbert, Utah State University Leslee Katayama, Utah Tax Commission Stephen Kroes, Utah Foundation Doug MacDonald, EconoWest Thomas N. Maloney, University of Utah Kelly Mathews, Wells Fargo, Retired Carrie Mayne, Utah Department of Workforce Services Darin Mellott, CBRE Alan Westenskow, Zions Bank Public Finance Jim Wood, Bureau of Economic and Business Research The Economic Club of Utah President: Mark Knold, Utah Department of Workforce Services Vice President: Phil Dean, Governor’s Office of Management and Budget Secretary: Nick Thiriot, Bureau of Economic and Business Research Treasurer: Colleen Huber, David Eccles School of Business Membership Chair: Michelle Beebe, Utah Department of Workforce Services Programs and Events Chair: Brigham Mellor, Salt Lake County Young Leaders Chair: Michael Merrill, Salt Lake Chamber The Salt Lake Chamber shares a strategic partnership with the Utah Economic Council and Economic Club of Utah to promote economic research, data and analysis important to the success of the Utah economy. Downtown Alliance Downtown Alliance Leaders President and CEO: Lane Beattie, Salt Lake Chamber and Downtown Alliance Chair: John Dahlstrom, Wasatch Properties Incoming Chair: Linda Wardell, City Creek Center Past Chair: Peggy Lander Executive Director: Jason Mathis, Downtown Alliance Downtown Alliance Board of Trustees: Christy Alter, Goldman, Sachs & Co.Bruce Bingham, Hamilton Partners Jake Boyer, The Boyer Company Kent Gibson, Capstone Property Management Kay Hall, Zions Bank Molly Mazzolini, Infinite Scale Jim Olson, Utah Jazz Gary Porter, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Vasilios Priskos, InterNet Properties Ex-Officio Board Members: Mayor Ralph Becker, Salt Lake City Mayor Ben McAdams, Salt Lake County Council Member Luke Garrott, Salt Lake City Council D.J. Baxter, Redevelopment Agency of Salt Lake City Scott Beck, Visit Salt Lake Babs De lay, Downtown Merchants Association Small Business Committee Chair: Kelly R. Harris, Harris Financial Utah James Andrus, Piercy Bowler Taylor & Kern Larry Bontempo, ES Media Dale Campbell, R&O Construction Company Taylor Cotterell, NaviTrust Valerie Curry, Argosy University Mike Gibbons, Wadsworth Development Group Ingolf de Jong, GENCOMM Tricia Kritzberg, Kritzberg Consulting Todd McLachlan, Commerce Real Estate Solutions Jon Nepstad, Fehr & Peers Bobby Peede, United States Audio Visual, LLC Chuck Penna, Penna Powers Joe Reidling, Critical Power Exchange Ryan Snow, NOVAS Business Advisors Bryan Washburn, Cambridge Financial Center John Webster, XMission Business Internet Mike Wright, Excellent Training Policy-related committees, subcommittees, task forces and councils have three basic policy responsibilities: n Identify current and emerging problems. n Develop policies and positions on issues to recommend to the Salt Lake Chamber Executive Board. n Provide support on policy analysis and communication efforts. Members also help generate membership and support for specific initiatives such as Prosperity 2020, Utah Transportation Coalition, Clean Air Champions, Clear the Air Challenge and the annual legislative reception.
  28. 28. TaskForceMembership World Trade Center Utah Board of Directors Founding Members: President & CEO: Derek Miller, World Trade Center Utah Chair: Scott Anderson, Zions Bank Lane Beattie, Salt Lake Chamber Alex Dunn, Vivint Christian Gardner, Gardner Co. David Huntsman, Huntsman Corporation Ron Jibson, Questar Corporation Jacob Kingston, Washakie Renewable Energy Executive Secretary Dean Luikart, Wells Fargo Greg Miller, LHM Management Corp Darin Parker, PMI Public Sector: Stuart Adams, Utah Senate Rob Behunin, Utah State University Jeff Edwards, EDCUtahNatalie Gochnour, University of Utah Val Hale, Governor's Office of Economic Development (GOED) Eric Hutchings, Utah House of Representatives Mark Madsen, Utah Senate Brad Wilson, Utah House of Representatives Private Sector: Vice-Chair: Lew Cramer, Coldwell Banker Mark Bouchard, CBRE Jason Combes, Rio Tinto Larry Coughlin, Boeing Mark Garfield, Zions BankTerry Grant, Key Bank Bruce Larson, Goldman Sachs Richard Nelson, Utah Technology Council Steve Price, Price Realty Group Paul Savage, Kirton McConkie David Utrilla, US Translation Company Prosperity 2020 Founders Council: Chair: Alan Hall, Tempus Global Data Vice-Chair: Keith Buswell, Wadman Corporation Scott A. Anderson, Zions Bank Lane Beattie, Salt Lake Chamber Philip Cofield, Junior Achievement of Utah, Inc. Rebecca Dutson, United Way of Salt Lake Jeff Edwards, Economic Development Corporation of Utah (EDCUtah) Val Hale, Governor's Office of Economic Development (GOED) Steve Kroes, Utah Foundation Derek Miller, World Trade Center Utah Richard Nelson, Utah Technology Council Gov. Olene Walker Prosperity 2020 Business Executives: Jeff Alexander, Alexander's Bruce Bingham, Hamilton Partners Mark Bouchard, CBRE Jake Boyer, The Boyer Company Roger Boyer, The Boyer Company Lonnie Bullard, Jacobsen Construction Company Mona Burton, Holland & Hart Adam Chase , Chase Marketing Group Wilford Clyde, Clyde Companies Lew Cramer, Coldwell Banker Commercial Jeffery Edwards, Economic Development Corporation of Utah (EDCUtah) Rick Folkerson, Ken Garff Automotive Group Kem Gardner, Gardner Company David Golden, Wells Fargo Dan Harbeke, Union Pacific Railroad Carol Hunter Ron Jibson, Questar Corporation Nolan Karras, Investment Management Research David Lang, Goldman, Sachs & Co. Charlie Lansche, Fidelity Investments David Layton, Layton Construction Company Stan Lockhart, IM Flash Technologies Daniel Lofgren, Cowboy Partners Thomas Love, Love Communications Brent Low, MediaOne of Utah Deborah Lux, ATK Robert S. Marquardt, Management & Training Corporation (MTC) Rich McKeown, Leavitt Partners Andrea Moss, Zions Bank Jeffery Nelson, Nelson Labs Scott Parson, Staker Parson Ray Pickup, WCF Greg Reid, SelectHealth Patricia Richards, SelectHealth Charles Sorenson, Intermountain Healthcare Bert Zimmerli, Intermountain Healthcare Chamber Support: Brigham City Area Chamber Cedar City Area Chamber Davis Chamber of Commerce Lehi Area Chamber of Commerce Moab Area Chamber of Commerce Murray Area Chamber of Commerce Ogden/Weber Chamber Park City Chamber Richfield Area Chamber Salt Lake County Business Alliance Sandy Area Chamber of Commerce South Jordan Chamber of Commerce South Salt Lake Chamber of Commerce Southwest Valley Chamber St. George Area Chamber of Commerce Utah Hispanic Chamber of Commerce Utah Valley Chamber of Commerce Vernal Area Chamber of Commerce Wayne County Business Association West Jordan Chamber of Commerce Education Policy Advisors: Richard Kendell Gary Carlston The Salt Lake Chamber and Prosperity 2020 acknowledge and thank the efforts of our strategic partner, Education First, in advocating for education excellence. Health System Reform Task Force Co-Chair: Marc Bennett, Healthinsight Co-Chair: Andrew Croshaw, Leavitt Partners Ron Andus, McKesson Pharmacuetical Verna Askwig, Wadsworth Development Group Bill Barnes, Intermountain Healthcare Former Lt. Governor Gregory Bell, UHA, Utah Hospitals & Health Systems Association William (Bill) Biddle, BC Technical, Inc. Doug Boudreaux, MountainStar - HCA Mountain Division Terry Buckner, The Buckner Company Brook Carlislie, ACS CAN David J. Castleton, Ray Quinney & Nebeker Bill Crim, United Way of Salt Lake Jennifer Danielson, Regence BlueCross BlueShield of Utah Chris DeLaMare, Gold Cross Services Mara Dykstra, University of Utah Hospitals and Clinics Lynda England, Healthinsight David Entwistle, University of Utah Hospitals and Clinics Michel Erdmann, RBM Building Services Inc. Raymond J. Etcheverry, Parsons Behle & Latimer Elizabeth Garbe, United Way of Salt Lake Christian Gardner, Gardner Company Jerianne Gerloff, Pfizer Inc. Paul Glauser, Staker Parson Companies Natalie Gochnour, University of Utah John Hanshaw, MountainStar - HCA Mountain Division Kelly R. Harris, Harris Financial Utah Michael Hawkins, Interim Healthcare Tim Homer, Wasatch Electric Scott Hymas, RC Willey Home Furnishings Lynda F. Jeppesen, Larry H. Miller Group of Companies Sean Jolley, Humana Erin Laney, Economic Development Corporation of Utah (EDCUtah) Gary Larcenaire, Valley Behavioral Health Catherine M. Larson, Strong & Hanni Eric Leavitt, Leavitt Group Chet Loftis, Regence BlueCross BlueShield of Utah Tim Loftis, Med One Capital James McDougal, Light Touch Medical Aesthetics Rich McKeown, Leavitt Partners Janet Metcalf, The Buckner Company Kaye Mickelson, City of Salt Lake Stephan Micklos, Merrill Lynch Donna Milavetz, OnSite Care Michael J. Miller, Strong & Hanni Doug Moody, Solution Services, Inc. Bill Moreton, Moreton & Company Dr. Sean Mulvihill, University of Utah Jon Murray, Humana Meredith Nickle, Enterprise Holdings, Inc. Jessica Palfreyman, Leavitt Partners Ray Pickup, WCF Kevin Pinegar, Durham Jones & Pinegar, P.C. Greg Poulsen, Intermountain Healthcare Brandon Rawlins, Jones Lang LaSalle Chris Redgrave, Zions Bank Rachel Reimann, SelectHealth Dana Smith, Dental Select Nick Standiford, North American Recovery Mark Stimpson, Regence BlueCross BlueShield of Utah Jill Taylor, KeyBank of Utah Juliette Tennert, Governor's Office of Planning & Budget Kimball Thomson, BIOUTAH Norman Thurston, Utah Department of Health Steven Tyler, Holland & Hart Dr. Rachot Vacharothone, After Hours Medical Company Brooke Venemon, Utah Transit Authority Mark Ward, University of Utah Nathan Wickizer, Cache Valley Electric Company JaeLynn Williams, 3M Health Information Systems S A LT L A K E C H A M B E R P U B L I C P O L I C Y G U I D E 26
  29. 29. S A LT L A K E C H A M B E R P U B L I C P O L I C Y G U I D E 27 Immigration Task Force Chair: Timothy Wheelwright, Durham Jones & Pinegar, P.C. Brian Alegre, Granite Construction Company Jeff Alexander, Alexander's Michael Arrett, Vantage Title Insurance Agency, LLC Brian Bethers, 1-800-Contacts Todd Bingham, Utah Manufacturers Association Melanie Bowen, Office of Senator Orrin G. Hatch Jake Boyer, Boyer Company, The Mark Brennan, Ames Construction Lonnie Bullard, Jacobsen Construction Company Diego Carroll, Parsons Brinckerhoff Jessica Christopher, Senator Mike Lee Wilford Clyde, Clyde Companies Mark Compton, Utah Mining Association Clint Ensign, Sinclair Companies Elizabeth Garbe, United Way of Salt Lake Sharon Garn, Office of Senator Orrin G. Hatch Terry Grant, Wells Fargo Tom Guinney, Gastronomy Val Hale, Governor's Office of Economic Development (GOED) Tyler Harvey, Wells Fargo Chris Hipwell, ABC-Associated Builders and Contractors, Inc. Clark Ivory, Ivory Homes Mary Ivory, Ivory Homes Sen. Scott Jenkins, Utah State Senate Jonathan Johnson, Overstock.com Jason Keith, Enterprise Holdings, Inc. Jason Mathis, Downtown Alliance Roger McConkie, Prince Yeates Lynn McMurray, Kirton McConkie Guy Mewburn, American Guys Asset Management Consultants Doug Moody, Solution Services, Inc. David Nixon, Jones Lang LaSalleBrett Okland, Okland Construction Company Scott Parson, Staker Parson Companies Ray Pickup, WCF Stan Rasmussen, Sutherland Institute Alan Rindlisbacher, Layton Construction Company Rebecca Sanchez, Salt Lake County Mayor's Office Jennifer Somers, Office of Congressman Rob Bishop, First District of Utah Paul Torres, Manuel's Fine Foods Roger Tsai, Holland & Hart Steven Tyler, Holland & Hart Jon Warburton, After Hours Medical Company Utah Transportation Coalition Membership Executive Committee: Chair: David Golden, Wells Fargo Kyle Adams, Delta Air Lines Abby Albrecht, Granite Construction Company Doug Anderson, Redmond Minerals Larry Anderson, Redmond Minerals Todd Beutler, Utah Urban Rural Specialized Transportation Association Bob Bonar, Snowbird Ski & Summer Resort Shannon Bond, Parsons Brinckerhoff Paul Campbell, Wheeler Machinery Co. Ron Clegg, Parsons Brinckerhoff Wilford Clyde, Clyde Companies Brent Jensen, HDR Engineering, Inc. Newel Jensen, Parsons Brinckerhoff Shauna Kane, Delta Air Lines Cheri McCurdy, Uintah Transportation Special Service District Bryan Olsen, WCF Scott W. Parson, Staker Parson Companies John Pfisterer, Komatsu Equipment Co. Kyle Phillips, Herzog Contracting Corp Michael Seare, Kiewit Infrastructure West Co. Dave L. Smith, Penna Powers Brad Sweet, Granite Construction Company John Tripi, Ames Construction, Inc. Con Wadsworth, Ralph L. Wadsworth Construction Zachary Wester, Blulng (Blu.) Strategic Members: Clayton Gilliland, Stacy and Witbeck, Inc. Richard Miller, PARSONS Supporting Members: Clint Ensign, Sinclair Companies Michael King, Wilson & Company, Inc., Engineers & Architects Michael Lasko, CH2M HILL Coalition Members: Mike Alter, Kilgore Companies Alene Bentley, Rocky Mountain Power Linnea Bentz, Humana Marty Biljanic, Wadsworth Development Group Allen Clemons, Hughes General Contractors, Inc. Peter Corroon, Ninigret Group Mark Droubay, Double D. Distribution Dan England, CR England - Global Transportation TJ England, CR England - Global Transportation Mark Green, M.C. Green & Sons, Inc. General Contractors Jeffrey Guy, Ash Grove Cement Company Chris Hipwell, ABC-Associated Builders and Contractors, Inc. Sydne Jacques, Jacques and Associates Jason Kilgore, Kilgore Companies Allison Milne, Cache Valley Electric Company Heather Morley, Morgan Asphalt Jon Nelson, Harris Rebar Jon Nepstad, Fehr & Peers Ken Nunley, Utelite Corporation Mardi Pearson, Fehr & Peers Associates Andy Powell, URS Corporation Tyler Robirds, H W Lochner, Inc. Brent Toller, Western Coating, Inc. Wick Udy, Jones Lang LaSalle Nathan Wickizer, Cache Valley Electric Company Michael Worrall, J.U.B. Engineers, Inc. Alliance Members: Kordel Braley, Institute of Transportation Engineers - Utah Chapter Richard Clasby, Utah Trucking Association Chris DeHerrera, ABC-Associated Builders and Contractors, Inc. Lee Peacock, Utah Petroleum Association Helen Peters, WTS-Northern Utah Nathan Rafferty, Ski Utah Reed Ryan, Utah Asphalt Pavement Association Sasha Seegmiller, Utah Highway Users Association Michael Smith, American Council of Engineering Companies Blake Thomas, Office of Energy Development Richard Thorn, Associated General Contractors Advisory Members: Michael Allegra, Utah Transit Authority Johnny Anderson, Utah House of Representatives Ken Bullock, Utah League of Cities & Towns H. David Burton, Utah Transit Authority, Board of Trustees Cameron Diehl, Utah League of Cities & Towns Andrew Gruber, Wasatch Front Regional Council Linda Hull, Utah Department of Transportation Robin Hutcheson, City of Salt Lake Curt Hutchings, Dixie Metropolitan Planning Organization Laynee Jones, Mountain Accord Jeremy Keele, Salt Lake County Jason Mathis, Downtown Alliance Lincoln Shurtz, Utah Association of Counties Adam Trupp, Utah Association of Counties LaVarr Webb, Exoro Group, The Muriel Xochimitl, Wasatch Front Regional Council The Salt Lake Chamber and Utah Transportation Coalition want to acknowledge the members of the Utah Association of Counties, Utah League of Cities and Towns and the Chambers of Commerce across Utah for their support of the Utah Transportation Coalition's communications effort. A full list of these participants are available at: www.utahtransportation.org
  30. 30. TaskForceMembership S A LT L A K E C H A M B E R P U B L I C P O L I C Y G U I D E 28 Natural Resources Business Council Co-Chair: Joe Cannon, Fuel Freedom Foundation Co-Chair: Stephen Sands, Rio Tinto Kennecott Clean Air Task Force Chair: Chris Lee, Deseret Management Corporation Alan Anderson, Chamber West Ryan Atkinson, Strong & Hanni Vicki Bennett, City of Salt Lake Steve Bergstrom, Intermountain Healthcare Kip Billings, Wasatch Front Regional Council Josh Brown, Kennecott Utah Copper Corporation Doug Carver, Carver Energy Services Jen Colby, University of Utah Jim Crowder, Enterprise Holdings, Inc. Mike Dalley, Staker Parson Companies Quinn Dietlein, Hale Centre Theatre Jeff Edwards, Economic Development Corporation of Utah (EDCUtah) Michel Erdmann, RBM Building Services Inc. Stanford Fitts, Strong & Hanni Kim Frost, Economic Development Corporation of Utah (EDCUtah) Carl Galbraith, Questar Corporation Andrew Gruber, Wasatch Front Regional Council Jonathan Johnson, Overstock.com Donna Kessler, Economic Development Corporation of Utah (EDCUtah) G.J. LaBonty, Utah Transit Authority Rich Lambert, Wells Fargo Michael Lasko, CH2M HILL Lance Lawrence, Kiewit Infrastructure West Co. Kate Lilja, City of Salt Lake Ronald Mangone, Strong & Hanni Jesse Mangum, Jones Lang LaSalle Erin Mendenhall, Breathe Utah Paul Murphy, Rocky Mountain Power Jon Nepstad, Fehr & Peers Associates Blaine E. Rawson, Ray Quinney & Nebeker Joe Reidling, Critical Power Exchange Holly Robb, Maverik, Inc. Stephen Sands, Rio Tinto Kennecott Daniel Seelos, PricewaterhouseCoopers Matt Sibul, Utah Transit Authority Brett Slack, Comcast Business Justin Smart, Penna Powers Stephen Smithson, Snell & Wilmer LLP Joe Stoddard, Grant Thornton LLP Robert Storey, Zions Bank Shannon Storrud, Hexcel Ryan Streams, USTAR Shawn Teigan, Utah Foundation Zachary Wester, Blulng (Blu.) Ian Wright, National Energy Foundation Sarah Wright, Utah Clean Energy Water Task Force Co-Chair: Rob Moore, Big-D Construction Corp. Co-Chair: Craig Wagstaff, Questar Corporation Abby Albrecht, Granite Construction Company Samuel Allen, REAL Salt Lake / Rio Tinto Stadium Steve Bergstrom, Intermountain Healthcare Maura Carabello, The Exoro Group KC Ericksen, Orbit Irrigation Products Brandon Finch, Kiewit Infrastructure West Co. Tage Flint, Weber Basin Water Conservancy District Chris Gamvroulas, Ivory Homes Marie Geist, American Water Graham Gilbert, Snell & Wilmer LLP Troy Jensen, Intermountain Healthcare Eric Marble, Chanshare & Green Valley Randy Marble, Chanshare & Green Valley Alan Matheson, Governor, State of Utah Brandon Monson, The Exoro Group Adam Murdock, CH2M HILL Brett Nielsen, Whitaker Construction Co., Inc. Scott W. Parson, Staker Parson Companies Steve Schnoor, Rio Tinto Kennecott Michael Smith, American Council of Engineering Companies Stephen Smithson, Snell & Wilmer LLP Nick Standiford, North American Recovery Jody Williams, Holland & Hart LLP Mike Wilson, Metropolitan Water District of Salt Lake & Sandy Energy and Minerals Task Force Former Chair: Dr. Laura Nelson, Governor's Office of Energy Development Ryan P. Atkinson, Strong & Hanni Nate Ballard, Wadsworth Development Group Desmond Barker Jr., Des Barker Associates Kimberly Barnett, Salt Lake County Mayor Ralph Becker, City of Salt Lake Vicki Bennett, City of Salt Lake Mike Bodell, Bodell Construction Bob Bonar, Snowbird Ski & Summer Resort Mark Brennan, Ames Construction Kenneth Bullock, Utah League of Cities & Towns Rey Butcher, Questar Corporation Bradley Cahoon, Snell & Wilmer LLP Diego Carroll, American Council of Engineering Companies Doug Carver, Carver Energy Services Steven J. Christiansen, Parr Brown Gee & Loveless Mark Compton, Utah Mining Association Denise Dragoo, Snell & Wilmer LLP Fred Ferguson, Office of Congressman Chaffetz Brandon Finch, Kiewit Infrastructure West Co. Stanford P. Fitts, Strong & Hanni Kelly Francone, Energy Strategies LLC Christian Gardner, Gardner Company Nick Goodman, CYRQ Energy Matt Greene, Red Leaf Resources Robert Grow, Envision Utah Scott Hardy, Cicero Group Jeff Hartley, Red Leaf Resources Tim Homer, Wasatch Electric Gary Hoogeveen, Rocky Mountain Power Rikki Hrenko-Browning, Enefit American Oil Brent Hunziker, Whitaker Construction Co., Inc. Tiffany James, Magnum Energy Ron Jibson, Questar Corporation Chane Kellerstrass, Kellerstrass Oil Company Job Kingston, A-FAB Engineering Christopher Kirkpatrick, Enterprise Holdings, Inc. Dennis Klaus, Salt Lake Community College Steve Kroes, Utah Foundation Scott Lamb, Wadsworth Development Group Rich Lambert, Wells Fargo Justin Lawrence, Tesoro Refining & Marketing Tammie Lucero, Uintah County Economic Development Ronald Mangone, Strong & Hanni Duane Marsala, Marsala & Co Nathan Marsala, Marsala & Co Mike McKee, Uintah County Guy Mewburn, American Guys Asset Management Consultants Shawn Packard, Red Leaf Resources Scott W. Parson, Staker Parson Companies Dan Patry, SunEdison Ray Pickup, WCF Monica Rafferty, Coldwell Banker Commercial Bob Reeder, Parsons Behle & Latimer Debra Rigby, Questar Corporation Gary Robinson, Questar Corporation Lisa Schauer, MacKay Sposito Dennis Schwartz, MacKay Sposito Brad Shafer, Rocky Mountain Power Polly Shaw, SunEdison Stuart Smith, Faithful & Gould Stephen Smithson, Snell & Wilmer LLP Heather Stettler, SWCA, Inc. (SWCA Environmental Consultants) Cody Stewart, Governor, State of Utah Joe Stoddard, Grant Thornton LLP Ryan Streams, USTAR Michael Swenson, Potash Ridge David Taylor, Rocky Mountain Power Shawn Teigan, Utah Foundation Chad Teply, Rocky Mountain Power Roger Tew, Utah League of Cities & Towns Brok Thayn, Hunt Electric, Inc. Kevin Townsend, Merrill Lynch Wick Udy, Jones Lang LaSalle Michael Vaughan, Rio Tinto Kennecott Richard Walje, Rocky Mountain Power Al Walker, USTAR Alan Westenskow, Zions Bank Zachary Wester, Blulng (Blu.) Art Westmoreland, WCF Brian Wilkinson, Wilkinson Ferrari & Co. Ian Wright, National Energy Foundation Sarah Wright, Utah Clean Energy The Natural Resources Business Council membership includes all the participants of the Clean Air, Energy, Outdoor Recreation and Tourism, and Water Task Forces.
  31. 31. S A LT L A K E C H A M B E R P U B L I C P O L I C Y G U I D E 29 Capitol Club Chair: Dan Harbeke, Union Pacific Railroad Vice-Chair: Greg Summerhays, WCF Neil Abercrombie, Utah State University C. Lance Allen, Waste Management of Utah Ryan Andrus, WCF Clay Ashdown, Intermountain Healthcare Ken Ashton, Snell & Wilmer L.L.P. Melanie Baker, Verisk Health Jan Bayle, Robert W. Baird & Co. Brock Beattie, Zions Management Services Company Jake Briem, LANDesk Software Inc. Todd Brightwell, Economic Development Corporation of Utah (EDCUtah) Josh Brown, Rio Tinto Kennecott Patrick Burt, Kipp and Christian, P.C. Brandon Burton, Bonneville International Corporation Aaron Call, G&A Partners Terry Capener, Lagoon Corporation Stuart Clason, Governor's Office of Energy Development Sheryl Cox, America First Credit Union Andrew Croshaw, The Leavitt Partners Denise Dragoo, Snell & Wilmer L.L.P. Scott Eastmond, KSL Newsradio 1160 AM/ KSFI FM 100 TJ England, CR England - Global Transportation Jake Goodliffe, Staker Parson Companies Eric Gustafson, CBRE Jeremy Hafen, Sunroc Building Materials, Inc. Jeff Hartley, Red Leaf Resources Vaughn Holbrook, Regence BlueCross BlueShield of Utah Eric Isom, CenturyLink Spencer Jenkins, Utah System of Higher Education Michael Johnson, FCS Community Management Sean Jolley, Humana David Kallas, Utah Transit Authority John Kimball, REAL Salt Lake / Rio Tinto Stadium Garrett Koerner, Ernst & Young, LLP Dean Luikart, Wells Fargo Boyd Martin, DR Horton Custom Homes Kristin McCullagh, SelectHealth Brad Mortensen, Weber State University Brennan Moss, Pia Anderson Dorius Reynard Moss Laura Nelson, Governor's Office of Energy Development Christina Oliver, Salt Lake County Business and Economic Development Elizabeth Palazzolo, Mountain Medical Chad Pehrson, Parr Brown Gee & Loveless Julie Penrod, Mountain Medical Jared Perry, Make-A-Wish Utah Jennifer Robinson, University of Utah - Center for Public Policy and Administration Brad Shafer, Rocky Mountain Power Tim Sheehan, Salt Lake Community College James Sheets, LDS Hospital Paul Skeen, Eide Bailly LLP Robert Spendlove, Utah State House of Representatives Steve Starks, Larry H. Miller Group of Companies Curtis Thornhill, Apt Marketing Solutions (ThornHill Holdings) Michael Todd, Deseret News Rachot Vacharothone, After Hours Medical Company Jack Vines, Verisk Health Richard Walje, Rocky Mountain Power Cori Ward, University of Utah Angela Welling, Google Timothy Wheelwright, Durham Jones & Pinegar, P.C. Brian Wilkinson, Wilkinson Ferrari & Co. Mike Winder, Zions Bank Together we succeed. Business unites as a family of chambers, industry associations and other key partners. Today, more than ever before, it is important to get involved. As Utah's largest statewide business association, we are working to solve the issues that impact Utah's business community, our economy and our collective future prosperity. Visit us at www.slchamber.com The Chamber has members in all 29 Utah counties, as well as 13 other states, Washington, D.C., Canada and France. Nearly 80 percent of our membership is comprised of small businesses. We have two strategic partners: the Downtown Alliance and World Trade Center Utah. The Economic Development Corporation of Utah (EDCUtah), the David Eccles School of Business, and the Governor’s Office of Economic Development (GOED) are also vital partnerships that support our success as a business community. We have formal partnerships with 28 other chambers of commerce or business associations: U.S. Chamber of Commerce, Utah State Chamber of Commerce, Brigham Area Chamber of Commerce, BioUtah, Cedar City Area Chamber of Commerce, ChamberWest, Davis Chamber of Commerce, East Valley Chamber of Commerce, Lehi Area Chamber of Commerce, Moab Chamber of Commerce, Murray Area Chamber of Commerce, National Association of Women Business Owners, Ogden/Weber Chamber, Park City Chamber/ Bureau, Richfield Area Chamber of Commerce, Sandy Area Chamber of Commerce, South Jordan Chamber of Commerce, South Salt Lake Chamber of Commerce, St. George Area Chamber of Commerce, Utah Asian Chamber of Commerce, Utah Hispanic Chamber, Utah Nonprofits Association, Utah Small Business Coalition, Utah Technology Council, Utah Valley Chamber of Commerce, Vest Pocket Business Coalition, Wayne County Chamber of Commerce, and West Jordan Chamber of Commerce—and we continue to establish new partnerships to strengthen the Utah economy. The Salt Lake Chamber has a formalized relationship with the World Bank Group and the International Development Bank to act as the Intermountain West region’s Private Sector Liaison Officer, and has signed memorandums of agreement with 16 international chambers, including: Tokyo Chamber of Commerce, AMCHAM Camera del Comercio Americana del Peru (Lima, Peru), London Chamber of Commerce and Industry (UK), Monterrey Chamber of Commerce (Mexico), Shan’xi Bureau of Commerce (China), Wuhan Chamber of Commerce (China), Chinese Committee for Promotion of International Trade, Italy Utah Cooperation Center (Italy), Vietnam Chamber of Commerce and Industry, Palestinian American Chamber of Commerce, Nanchang General Chamber of Commerce (China), Sana’a Chamber of Commerce (Yemen), World Trade Center St. Petersburg (Russia), Ural Chamber of Commerce & Industry (Russia), and Camara de Comercio y Produccion de Sullana (Peru).
  32. 32. The Salt Lake Chamber Board of Governors recognizes and appreciates the Chamber staff for its dedication and professionalism. twitter.com/ saltlakechamber flickr.com/ saltlakechamber facebook.com/ saltlakechamber linkedin.com/ saltlakechamber youtube.com/ saltlakechamber slchamber.com slchamber.com/blog SALT LAKE CHAMBER I 175 E. University Blvd. (400 S.) #600 I Salt Lake City, Utah 84111 I 801.364.3631 I slchamber.com SALT LAKE CHAMBER 2014-2015 BOARD OF GOVERNORS Don H. Adams, Bear River Mutual Insurance Company John A. Adams, Ray Quinney & Nebeker Kyle Adams, Delta Air Lines Abby Albrecht, Granite Construction Company Pres. Stan Albrecht, Utah State University Jeff Alexander, Alexander's Michael Allegra, Utah Transit Authority Christy Alter, Goldman, Sachs & Co. Larry Anderson, Redmond Minerals Jim Balderson, Jones Lang LaSalle Gene Barton, Hexcel Corporation D.J. Baxter, Redevelopment Agency of Salt Lake City Scott Beck, Visit Salt Lake, The Convention and Visitors Bureau Mayor Ralph Becker, City of Salt Lake Brian Bethers, 1-800-Contacts Robert Brems, Utah College of Applied Technology Mark Brennan, Ames Construction Barrie Brewer, Syloet Solutions International Todd Brightwell, Economic Development Corporation of Utah (EDCUtah) Bryce Buchanan, PricewaterhouseCoopers Lonnie Bullard, Jacobsen Construction Company Keith Buswell, Wadman Corporation Dale Campbell, R&O Construction Company Robert Campbell, Wheeler Machinery Andy Carroll, REAL Salt Lake / Rio Tinto Stadium Lee Carter, UBS Bank USA Samuel Clark, Dale Barton Agency Ron Clegg, Parsons Brinckerhoff Wilford Clyde, Clyde Companies Dean Cottle, Robert W. Baird & Co. Lew Cramer, Coldwell Banker Commercial Michael Dale, New Media Strategists Bob Dalley, Deseret Power Jennifer Danielson, Regence BlueCross BlueShield of Utah Raymond Dardano, Marlin Business Bank Ingolf de Jong, GENCOMM Kay Hall, Zions Bank Alex Dunn, Vivint Donald Dunn, Fuel Freedom Foundation Rebecca Dutson, United Way of Salt Lake Spencer Eccles, The Cynosure Group Jeff Edwards, Economic Development Corporation of Utah (EDCUtah) Gary England, Headwaters TJ England, CR England - Global Transportation Clint Ensign, Sinclair Companies David Entwistle, University of Utah Hospitals and Clinics KC Ericksen, Orbit Irrigation Products Raymond J. Etcheverry, Parsons Behle & Latimer Mark E. Faas, Deloitte & Touche LLP Matt Finnegan, Kern River Gas Transmission Company Tage Flint, Weber Basin Water Conservancy District Rick Folkerson, Ken Garff Automotive Group Rob Fox, Brahma Group Christian Gardner, Gardner Company Luke Garrott, Salt Lake City Council David Gessel, UHA, Utah Hospitals & Health Systems Association Kent Gibson, Capstone Property Management Marsha Gilford, Smith's Food & Drug Stores Mike Goar, Canyons Resort Lisa Gough, Sysco Intermountain Terry Grant , Key Bank Robert Grow, Envision Utah Jonathan Hafen, Parr Brown Gee & Loveless Neil Hafer, Enterprise Holdings, Inc. John Hanshaw, MountainStar - HCA Mountain Division Dan Harbeke, Union Pacific Railroad Kelly R. Harris, Harris Financial Utah Kurt Hawes, Washakie Pres. Matthew Holland, Utah Valley University Tim Homer, Wasatch Electric Brandi Honey, SkyWest Airline Greg Hopkins, Hero Partners Tom Hori, REDCON Curt Howell, Leavitt Partners Mark Howell, AmericanWest Bank Kirk Huffaker, Utah Heritage Foundation Pres. Deneece Huftalin, Salt Lake Community College Scott Hymas, RC Willey Home Furnishings Eric Isom, CenturyLink Jonathan Johnson, Overstock.com Richard Johnson, Stoel Rives Sen. Patricia Jones, Dan Jones & Associates Steve Kroes, Utah Foundation Bob Lake, Eide Bailly LLP Charlie Lansche, Fidelity Investments Gary Larcenaire, Valley Behavioral Health Chris Lee, Deseret Management Corporation Pres. Brian Levin-Stankevich, Westminster College David Lockwood, EnergySolutions Daniel Lofgren, Cowboy Partners Steve Lundgren, Marriott Hotels Al Manbeian, GPS Capital Markets, Inc. Bill Manning, REAL Salt Lake / Rio Tinto Stadium Mayor McAdams Ben, Salt Lake County Ron Mangone, Strong & Hanni Rich McKeown, Leavitt Partners Kyle McSlarrow, Comcast Business Mike Moffitt, Gold Cross Services Robert Murdock, ATK Aerospace Structures Richard Nelson, Utah Technology Council Sterling Nielsen, Mountain America Credit Union Corporate Merritt Norton, Blulng (Blu.) Brett Okland, Okland Construction Company Jim Olson, Miller Sports Properties Kimberly Page, Keystone Aviation Robert Patterson, U. A. Local #140 - Pipefitters - Plumbers - HVAC & R Candice Payne, Alaska Airlines Pres. David Pershing, University of Utah David A. Peterson, O.C. Tanner Company Walter Plumb, Plumb Holdings Gary Porter, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Greg Randall, KPMG Dean. Taylor Randall, David Eccles School of Business, U of U Chris Redgrave, Zions Bank David Reid, ABC 4 Utah Patricia Richards, SelectHealth Robin Rockwood, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco / Salt Lake City Branch Ronald Ruff, Mountain Medical Don Schulthies, Wal-Mart Stores Michael Seare, Kiewit Infrastructure West Co. Daniel Shapiro, eBay Randy Shumway, Cicero Group Aaron Skonnard, Pluralsight John Spigiel, Watson Laboratories Steven Stauffer, Grant Thornton LLP Kami Taylor, CBRE Kimball Thomson, BIOUTAH Joe Tomon, Proctor & Gamble Paul Torres, Manuel's Fine Foods Maxine Turner, Cuisine Unlimited Catering & Special Events Rachot Vacharothone, After Hours Medical Company Vicki Varela, Utah Office of Tourism, Film and Global Branding Kip Wadsworth, Wadsworth Development Group Jin Wang, Westminster College John W. Ward, Harmons Mike Washburn, Thanksgiving Point Glen Watkins, Jones Waldo Holbrook & McDonough Michael Weinholtz, CHG Healthcare Services Angie Welling, Google Grant Whitaker, Utah Housing Corporation Nathan Wickizer, Cache Valley Electric Company Pres. Charles Wight, Weber State University Brent Williams, Dental Select JaeLynn Williams, 3M Health Information Systems Jody Williams, Holland & Hart Superintendent McKell Withers, Salt Lake City School District Andrea Wolcott, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco / Salt Lake City Branch Todd Wolfenbarger, Summit Group Edgar Wright, Pepsi Beverages Company David Zimmerman, Brahma Group Craig Zollinger, Chase SALT LAKE CHAMBER 2014-2015 EXECUTIVE BOARD President and CEO: Lane Beattie, Salt Lake Chamber Chair: Terry Buckner, The Buckner Company Vice Chair: Lori Chillingworth, Zions Bank Bruce Bingham, Hamilton Partners Jake Boyer, The Boyer Company John Dahlstrom, Wasatch Group (Commercial Management) Chris Gamvroulas, Ivory Homes David Golden, Wells Fargo Val Hale, Governor's Office of Economic Development (GOED) Victor Ingalls, American Express Centurion Bank Ron Jibson, Questar Corporation Fred Lampropoulos, Merit Medical Systems, Inc. Peggy Lander Brent Low, MediaOne of Utah Molly Mazzolini, Infinite Scale Keith McMullin, Deseret Management Corporation Derek Miller, World Trade Center Utah Scott Parson, Staker Parson Companies Ray Pickup, WCF Vasilios Priskos, InterNet Properties Stephen Sands, Rio Tinto Kennecott Gary Stevenson, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Richard Walje, Rocky Mountain Power Linda Wardell, City Creek Center - The Taubman Company Bert Zimmerli, Intermountain Healthcare

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