POLICY

Public

2014

Guide

As Utah’s business leader, we stand as the voice of business, we support
our members’ success...
The Salt Lake Chamber

13

Members in

29

States

Counties

Plus Ontario, Canada

The Salt Lake Chamber is a statewide ch...
Dear Fellow Utahns,
Our financial sector colleagues remind us that businesses are doing well, but their capital is sitting...
Economic

Development

“Economic
development is the
Salt Lake Chamber’s
priority. We engage in
policy issues that
strength...
Economic Development

Utah Jobs Agenda
A plan to create 150,000 jobs in five years
44,380

60,000 - 55,594
47,368
40,000 -...
Economic Development

n	 Building Utah’s image – Perceptions of Utah are an
important component of our economic developmen...
Economic Development

Utah’s Future

Utah is facing unprecedented growth that will affect
every facet of our community, bu...
Education

Prosperity 2020

“In terms of
economic prosperity,
transportation is the
rails and education is
the engine as w...
Education – Prosperity 2020

Minority Share of Population

Utah’s School Age Population (Ages 5–17)

Utah’s minority share...
Education – Prosperity 2020

Prosperity 2020’s goal is to
improve educational results
School-business partnerships improve...
Education – Prosperity 2020

Prosperit y 2020 BUSINESS SUPPORT
Prosperity 2020 Founders Council
Economic Development Corpo...
nt study

Utah Transportation

1.3 Billion for a total of $54.7 billion

ons as growth jobs)
Utah’s households and busines...
UTAH Transportation Coalition

n	 Comprehensive five-year transportation funding action –
We commend the Utah legislature ...
UTAH Transportation Coalition

Recent Accomplishments
n	 Utah Transportation Coalition – Formerly the Utah Mobility
Coalit...
UTAH Transportation Coalition

Utah's motor fuel tax has not increased since 1997

0
Increase
%

44 175
Increase
Increase
...
Natural Resource

Business Council

“Utah’s natural
resources provide
Utah families with
unparalleled life
quality and eco...
N a t u r a l Re s o u r c e s

Water
“The Salt Lake
Chamber has a long
history of being
involved in water
issues in Utah—...
N a t u r a l Re s o u r c e s

Clean Air
“For many Utahns,
clean air is the state’s
most pressing issue.
Cleaning the air...
N a t u r a l Re s o u r c e s

72

#

Number of
Champions
Five Year Impact of Clear Air Challenge

Recent Accomplishments...
N a t u r a l Re s o u r c e s

Energy & Minerals
“Responsible
development of
Utah’s natural
resources will fuel
Utah’s ec...
N a t u r a l Re s o u r c e s

Utah Mining/Minerals

291 30,690

Mining operations

Direct jobs

Utah’s Energy Competitiv...
N a t u r a l Re s o u r c e s

Outdoor

Recreation & Tourism
"Utah's world-class
outdoor recreation
and tourism fuel our
...
N a t u r a l Re s o u r c e s

More than

200,000
direct jobs in
outdoor recreation,
travel and
tourism-related
industrie...
Health System

Reform

“Utah’s health system
is the envy of the
nation. By partnering
with employers, we
can continue to
i...
H e a lt h S y s t e m Re f o r m

90

Lowest
health care
costs in the
nation

%

2

#

Invest an additional $11.3 Billion...
Downtown
"Salt Lake City is a
major gateway to the
rest of Utah. Bringing
visitors to Salt Lake
City and the rest of
the s...
30
20

Downtown

10
0

1980 100

1990

90

100

2000

100

88.4%

100
79.0%

80

2012

77.6%

Percent of 70
population liv...
International
“Every major policy
issue supported by the
Salt Lake Chamber
is critical to Utah’s
international
competitive...
I n t e r n at io n a l
20
15
10

1

20

6.8

5

15
20

0

20
19.2

19.2

15

13.8
10

10.3
6.8

5

20

2006

2008

5
2012...
Immigration
“Utah businesses
are counting on our
elected leaders in
Washington to act
on immigration
reform. An improved
i...
Small Business
Statement of Principles
n	 Lifeblood of the Utah economy – Approximately 700,000 Utahns are employed
by app...
S a lt L a k e Ch a m b e r 2 0 1 3 – 2 0 1 4 E x e c u t i v e B OA R D
Lane Beattie, Salt Lake Chamber
Bruce Bingham, Ha...
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2014 Public Policy Guide

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The Salt Lake Chamber's annual Public Policy Guide, outlining the policy issues that the business community will be focused on during the 2014 Legislative Session.

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2014 Public Policy Guide

  1. 1. POLICY Public 2014 Guide As Utah’s business leader, we stand as the voice of business, we support our members’ success and we champion community prosperity.
  2. 2. The Salt Lake Chamber 13 Members in 29 States Counties Plus Ontario, Canada The Salt Lake Chamber is a statewide chamber of commerce representing 7,850 businesses, which employ nearly half the workforce of our state. We are a capital city chamber with a statewide mission and reach. Just as the capital city is the center of commerce in our state, the Chamber works to strengthen the statewide business climate. The Chamber has members in all 29 Utah counties, as well as 13 other states and Washington, D.C. Nearly 80 percent of our membership is comprised of small businesses. We have two strategic partners: the Downtown Alliance and World Trade Center Utah. Currently, we have formal partnerships with 28 other chambers of commerce or business associations: U.S. Chamber of Commerce, Utah State Chamber of Commerce, Brigham Area Chamber of Commerce, BioUtah, Cedar City Area Chamber of Commerce, ChamberWest, Davis Chamber of Commerce, East Valley Chamber of Commerce, Lehi Area Chamber of Commerce, Moab Chamber of Commerce, Murray Area Chamber of Commerce, National Association of Women Business Owners, Odgen/Weber Chamber, Park City Chamber/Bureau, Richfield Area Chamber of Commerce, Sandy Area Chamber of Commerce, South Jordan Chamber of Commerce, South Salt Lake Chamber of Commerce, St. George Area Chamber of Commerce, Utah Asian Chamber of Commerce, Utah Hispanic Chamber, Statement on Civility The Salt Lake Chamber believes civility must be a guiding value in public discourse. We commit ourselves to respectful discourse in the public square and pledge to do our part to promote civil society. “We invite elected officials, community leaders, members of the media and all Utahns to join us in advancing polite and civil discourse. I have no doubt that our public policies will be better if we develop them with civility.” 7,850 Businesses represented 500,000 Employees represented Utah Nonprofits Association, Utah Small Business Coalition, Utah Technology Council, Utah Valley Chamber of Commerce, Vest Pocket Business Coalition, Wayne County Chamber of Commerce, and West Jordan Chamber of Commerce—and we continue to establish new partnerships to strengthen the Utah economy. The Salt Lake Chamber has a formalized relationship with the World Bank Group and the International Development Bank to act as the Intermountain West region’s Private Sector Liaison Officer, and has signed memorandums of agreement with 16 international chambers, including: Tokyo Chamber of Commerce, AMCHAM Camera del Comercio Americana del Peru (Lima, Peru), London Chamber of Commerce and Industry (UK), Monterrey Chamber of Commerce (Mexico), Shan’xi Bureau of Commerce (China), Wuhan Chamber of Commerce (China), Chinese Committee for Promotion of International Trade, Italy Utah Cooperation Center (Italy), Vietnam Chamber of Commerce and Industry, Palestinian American Chamber of Commerce, Nanchang General Chamber of Commerce (China), Sana’a Chamber of Commerce (Yemen), World Trade Center St. Petersburg (Russia), Ural Chamber of Commerce & Industry (Russia), and Camara de Comercio y Produccion de Sullana (Peru). Contents: Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Economic Development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Prosperity 2020 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Transportation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Natural Resource Business Council . . . . . . . . . 14 Water . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Clean Air . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Energy & Minerals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Outdoor Recreation & Tourism . . . . . . . . . . 20 Health Care Reform . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Downtown . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 International . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Immigration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Small Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Follow us online: Cover photo by LLoyd Nielsen youtube.com/ saltlakechamber facebook.com/ saltlakechamber flickr.com/ saltlakechamber twitter.com/ saltlakechamber Lane Beattie, President and CEO, Salt Lake Chamber slchamber.com/ blog plus.google.com/ +Slchamber
  3. 3. Dear Fellow Utahns, Our financial sector colleagues remind us that businesses are doing well, but their capital is sitting idle in bank accounts. Data shows continual growth in corporate profits, which are on track to top $1.7 trillion in 2014. Businesses have resources to invest and expend, yet this capital remains on the sidelines. Why? It’s simple. Businesses are led by rational people. Rational people are leery to invest when factors that have a significant impact on the success of a venture are unknown or constantly changing. Some recent news headlines tell the story: n n n n n n “An economy buried by regulations” - US News and World Report, 8-27-2013 “Political uncertainty will continue to stunt economic growth” - Forbes, 10-16-2013 “The government shutdown cost the U.S. 120,000 jobs” - The Christian Science Monitor, 10-24-2013 “Obamacare delaying hiring, debt ceiling debate and shutdown hurt the economy” - Forbes, 10-16-2013 “Policy uncertainty paralyzes the economy” - Wall Street Journal, 9-24-2013 “Cost of regulation just topped $1 trillion” - CNBC, 11-21-2013 Here is the kicker—we do this to ourselves. Our own actions are keeping businesses in low gear. If we will just get out of our own way, our economy is ready to ignite with productivity. Our mission at the Salt Lake Chamber is to support our members’ success. To accomplish this, we advocate for simplified and reasonable regulations as well as predictable and certain laws, so rational people can be confident in deploying resources into a productive economy. This 2014 Public Policy Guide states our policy principles and outlines our objectives for the coming year. We invite our elected leaders to partner with us in unleashing the productive resources of business. Together we can make Utah a premier global business destination. Lane Beattie President and CEO Ron Jibson Chair S alt L ake C hamber 2 0 1 4 P ublic P olicy G uide 1
  4. 4. Economic Development “Economic development is the Salt Lake Chamber’s priority. We engage in policy issues that strengthen our economy. As we move forward with our stellar public and private sector partners, we can accomplish the governor’s vision of being a premier global business destination.” Natalie Gochnour, Chief Economist, Salt Lake Chamber and Associate Dean, University of Utah David Eccles School of Business 2 Statement of Principles n Free enterprise – We support America’s free enterprise system as the best way to grow the economy, stimulate innovation and create jobs over the long term. n Ingredients for success – We believe low taxes, effective regulations, strong families, top-notch infrastructure, a talented workforce, and a well-managed and limited government create the environment for economic success. n Thriving community – We champion Utah’s enviable life quality and commitment to the greater good, including support for Utah’s major arts organizations. n Strategic partnerships – We create and sustain model partnerships with the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, the Governor’s Office of Economic Development, Economic Development Corporation of Utah, World Trade Center Utah, the Downtown Alliance, Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses, Utah Small Business Coalition, the David Eccles School of Business, chambers of commerce and business associations, and other like-minded entities. Polic y Posit ion s n Stand against harmful regulation – We will actively pursue opportunities to reduce the regulatory burden on business and improve the fairness and effectiveness of government regulations. n Collection of remote sales and use taxes – We support a simplified regulatory framework under which remote sellers collect and remit taxes already owed by individual buyers to the state. The Chamber's statement of principles is available at www.slchamber.com/economicdevelopment. 2014 Public Polic y Priorit ies n Jobs – The Salt Lake Chamber joins with Gov. Gary Herbert to make job creation a top priority. We support the governor’s plan to facilitate the creation of 100,000 jobs in 1,000 days and offer a complimentary private sector job creation plan, the Utah Jobs Agenda. Utah’s private sector is set to achieve this year the Utah Jobs Agenda goal of creating 150,000 jobs in five years—more than a year ahead of schedule. We will continue to make job creation a major focus. The Utah Jobs Agenda also set out a number of additional goals, from education to exports, to grow Utah’s economy. In the past two years, Utah has made significant progress and even surpassed these goals. The Chamber will continue to champion these priorities for robust economic growth. S alt L ake C hamber 2 0 1 4 P ublic P olicy G uide Since January 2011: Education – Top state priority Air Quality – Top state priority Transportation – Completed over $4 billion in projects International – Exports are now more than triple our 2006 numbers at more than $18 billion Immigration – Utah’s guest-worker law and Utah Compact are national examples of responsible reform
  5. 5. Economic Development Utah Jobs Agenda A plan to create 150,000 jobs in five years 44,380 60,000 - 55,594 47,368 40,000 - 42,362 (YTD) 33,443 Projected 20,000 1,291 0- -7,217 -20,000 -40,000 -60,000 - -63,734 -80,000 - 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 Source: Utah Dept. of Workforce Services and the Salt Lake Chamber n No general tax increase – We oppose increases in income, sales or property taxes that are not supported by the public. The state of Utah should ensure that transportation user fees are increased to meet critical mobility needs and indexed or otherwise adjusted over time to keep pace with inflation. n Regional headquarters – We challenge our economic development partners, and pledge our best efforts, to place an emphasis on attracting regional corporate headquarters in the coming years. Number of Fortune 500 companies in Western states 2 0 0 8 1 0 0 5 4 1 10 3 54 4 6 0 52 Recent Major Corporate Recruitment/Expansions in Utah Company Location Jobs created* Workday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Salt Lake City . . . . . . . . 250 Family Dollar . . . . . . . . . . . St. George. . . . . . . . . . . 450 Hexcel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Salt Lake City . . . . . . . . 660 Xactware. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lehi. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 859 P&G. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Box Elder. . . . . . . . . . . 1,185 Goldman Sachs. . . . . . . . . Salt Lake City . . . . . . . 1,200 SyberJet/Metalcraft. . . . . . Cedar City . . . . . . . . . . 1,200 IM Flash Technologies. . . . Lehi. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,850 eBay, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Draper . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,200 Exelis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Salt Lake City . . . . . . . 2,700 *Jobs are created over the lifetime of the incentive Source: Governor’s Office of Economic Development n Taxes and fiscal flexibility – Federal and state tax reform are emerging issues that must be addressed. We will work actively with elected leaders to consider the best process, approach and options for meaningful tax reform. We will also work with lawmakers to preserve legislative flexibility for future appropriations and support fair tax policies for Utah’s hospitality industry. n Sustain USTAR – We support the mission of the Utah Science Technology and Research initiative as a critical component to continued economic growth. We support continued funding of the initiative. n Alcohol regulation – Regulation of alcohol should satisfy public demand, ensure public safety, discourage underage drinking, as well as support a welcoming and hospitable climate for tourism and business recruitment efforts. n Statewide non-discrimination ordinance – We support a standardized statewide non-discrimination ordinance that protects against employment and housing discrimination while guaranteeing protections for religious liberty. n First Amendment rights – We support policy efforts to ensure individuals, businesses and organizations are not restricted in exercising First Amendment rights. n High-tech industry incentives – We support tax incentives that enhance and grow Utah’s economy in critical areas such as life sciences, advanced manufacturing, software and IT development, aerospace and defense, logistics and distribution centers, and financial services. Source: Fortune S alt L ake C hamber 2 0 1 4 P ublic P olicy G uide 3
  6. 6. Economic Development n Building Utah’s image – Perceptions of Utah are an important component of our economic development success. We support continued funding of Utah’s business marketing and global branding efforts, which will build Utah’s global brand and keep Utah “top of mind” as a place businesses need to be. We oppose unproductive “message bills” that detract from our state’s image. n Broadband – We support the state coordinated effort to expand broadband access, enhance reliability and increase speed so that Utah can remain a leader in economic development. n Utah Economic Council and the Economic Club of Utah – The Salt Lake Chamber has partnered with the David Eccles School of Business and the Utah Governor’s Office of Management and Budget to create the Utah Economic Council. This council will serve as the board of directors for the Economic Club of Utah, provide economic leadership for the state and oversee content of the Economic Report to the Governor. n Unmanned Systems – Unmanned systems present a unique economic development opportunity for Utah in the multibillion dollar sector of both air and ground systems. We support the state effort to build its unmanned systems capabilities. n Foreign Direct Investment – We support the Governor’s Office of Economic Development, the World Trade Center Utah, local governments and other stakeholders in attracting foreign investment dollars and partnerships. n Rural economic development – We support continued rural economic development through the state Business Resource Centers, SBA Small Business Development Centers, Office of Rural Development, local chambers of commerce and other stakeholders. Utah Economic Council Public co-chair: Juliette Tennert, Governor's Office of Management and Budget Private co-chair: Natalie Gochnour, Salt Lake Chamber Chris Bray, Utah Nonprofits Association Wes Curtis, Southern Utah University John Edwards, Cicero Group 4 Richard W. Evans, Brigham Young University John Gilbert, Utah State University Leslee Katayama, Utah State Tax Commission Stephen Kroes, Utah Foundation Doug MacDonald, EconoWest Tom Maloney, University of Utah S alt L ake C hamber 2 0 1 4 P ublic P olicy G uide Kelly Matthews, Wells Fargo, Retired Carrie Mayne, Utah Department of Workforce Services Darin Mellott, CBRE Alan Westenskow, Zions Bank Public Finance Jim Wood, Bureau of Economic and Business Research
  7. 7. Economic Development Utah’s Future Utah is facing unprecedented growth that will affect every facet of our community, businesses and quality of life. This growth brings challenges and a tremendous opportunity to strengthen our economy and enhance our state's global competitiveness. Population Growth 2012 2040 2,855,287 Wasatch Front: +1,146,431 The Utah business community joins with Gov. Herbert, and other key organizations and individuals throughout the state to support "Your Utah, Your Future," led by Envision Utah, in taking the long-term view on public policy issues. 4,570,433 Outside Wasatch Front: +568,715 School Age Population (Ages 5–17) 2012 630,124 2040 861,024 Elderly Population (Ages 65+) 2012 271,419 2040 704,887 Working Age Population (ages 18-65) 2012 1,695,596 60.1% Change Private Sector Employment Growth 2012 2040 1,379,948 2,273,536 2040 2,643,158 Source: Bureau of the Census and Governor's Office of Planning and Budget Note: Wasatch Front population includes Davis, Salt Lake, Utah and Weber counties. S alt L ake C hamber 2 0 1 4 P ublic P olicy G uide 5
  8. 8. Education Prosperity 2020 “In terms of economic prosperity, transportation is the rails and education is the engine as we steam towards success. Fueling that engine and supporting that infrastructure are both necessary to build the strongest economy in the nation.” The Vision Alan Hall, Chair, Prosperity 2020; Founder and Co-Managing Director, Mercato Partners; Chairman, Marketstar 2014 Public Polic y Priorit ies Innovation, Accountability and Investment – The largest population of young people in the country will be deployed as the best educated workforce, propelling Utah to enduring prosperity. We support efforts to develop a framework for a disciplined and prudent planning process that will identify both the funding needs and mechanisms to return Utah to a top-10 state in overall education within the next decade. Prosperit y 2020 Goals: 90 % of students will be proficient in math and reading 90 66 % will graduate from high school % of Utahns will have postsecondary certificates or degrees Utah will be a As part of education, center for technology jobs and businesses will enjoy a renewed emphasis Top 10 STEM THE ARTS We applaud and support the Utah Legislature’s Education Task Force efforts to find solutions to move Utah towards reaching the goals stated above. Prosperity 2020 supports their recommendations on public and higher education issues, including: n Initiatives to improve 4th grade reading scores: ● Increase pre-school access for at-risk children – We support funding pre-school programs that prepare at-risk children to enter school ready to learn. ● Expand optional full-day kindergarten programs – We support doubling our fullday kindergarten classes to serve an additional 5,000 at-risk students. ● Expand early intervention reading programs – We support results-based funding for expanded early intervention reading programs. n Initiatives to improve 8th grade math scores: ● ● 6 Teacher professional development – We support a three-year program for middle grade math teachers to improve the quality of instruction across the state. Improve STEM learning – We support the provision of innovative math education hardware and software to support math instruction for students. S alt L ake C hamber 2 0 1 4 P ublic P olicy G uide
  9. 9. Education – Prosperity 2020 Minority Share of Population Utah’s School Age Population (Ages 5–17) Utah’s minority share of the population is increasing rapidly 50% - 49% 45% 45% 40% 40% 35% 35% - 31% 30% - 27% 24% 25% - 20% 20% - 32% 19% 19% 22% 37% 34% 27% 25% 15% 15% 10% - 8% 8% 9% 10% 5% 0% 1980 1990 Utah 2000 2010 2020 2030 Salt Lake County 2040 U.S. 630,000 720,000 860,000 2012 2020 2040 Source: Bureau of the Census and the Univ. of Utah, Bureau of Economic and Business Research Source: Bureau of the Census and Governor's Office of Planning and Budget n Initiatives to improve high school completion and college and career readiness: Educational Attainment ● ● Expand access to school counselors – We support additional counselor positions to improve access for students that are at risk of not graduating, support college and career readiness and STEM counselors in every high school. We also support early intervention technology programs to assist high school counselors and student advocates. Empower students – We support a student advocate program to provide additional support for over 30,000 current high school students who are at risk of not graduating. % of population 25 and older with a bachelor’s degree 22.3% 22.6% 29.7% 1990 Source: Bureau of the Census Utah’s 8th Grade Math Scores and Ranks Year Score Rank Incentivize innovation – We support incentives for innovative teaching through results-proven technology grants and other innovative teaching strategies that improve instruction and performance of students. n Initiatives to support Utah achieving the 66% goal: ● 2010 15 #16 #17 Rank # n Initiatives to encourage innovative teaching in public education: ● 2000 Enhance parental and family engagement – We support education policy that recognizes the importance of family involvement and encourages parental participation. Data shows this participation is one of the most influential determinants of a child’s success in learning. ● Strengthen higher education – We support capacity funding for higher education to admit, retain and graduate more students. ● Support students – We support expanded need and performance-based financial aid for students, especially in regards to STEM-related majors. Source: National Assessment of Educational Progress Utah’s 4th Grade Reading Scores and Ranks Rank: 15 12 #26 # Rank: Score 220 1992 # Rank: Score 222 2002 1 Score 223 2013 Source: National Assessment of Educational Progress S alt L ake C hamber 2 0 1 4 P ublic P olicy G uide 7
  10. 10. Education – Prosperity 2020 Prosperity 2020’s goal is to improve educational results School-business partnerships improve school environments and boost outcomes for our students. Tutoring Students Serving as Board Members and Consultants The Larry H. Miller Group of Companies and Questar Corporation are two big supporters of Read Today. Their volunteers spend an hour a week tutoring struggling readers. Results show students making huge gains in reading proficiency. Read Today is in elementary schools throughout Utah. Helping students to reach proficiency in reading is key to improving outcomes as they continue their schooling. Providing Space for Events Sponsoring Activities Weighing in on Programs of Study Donating Money, Goods and Services Goldman Sachs, ATK and Nelson Laboratories shared industry perspectives at a conference of school counselors seeking to align the education of today’s students with the needs of the marketplace. Wells Fargo volunteers visited students in more than 120 Utah classrooms. Bankers are teaching 4th-12th grade students the essentials of financial education and necessary real-world skills. Alexander’s Print Advantage was among the sponsors of the Utah Valley Spelling Bee where 58 students in 3rd-8th grade competed against one another. The company helped the winner travel to Washington, D.C., to compete in the Scripps National Spelling Bee. Sharing Expertise Providing Internships IM Flash Technologies donated 74 desktop computers to 6th -8th grade students in the mathematics instruction technology program that prepares students for college mathematics courses. Volunteering in Classrooms Funding Scholarships Get involved and help put Utah on the path to enduring prosperity. Join Prosperity 2020 in its efforts to enhance education in Utah. Find out more about participating in the Prosperity 2020 Business Promise with Read Today and other exemplary programs, such as Road to Success, Junior Achievement, Utah Scholars and United Way. Join the Movement. Visit: Prosperity2020.com 8 S alt L ake C hamber 2 0 1 4 P ublic P olicy G uide Alan Hall, Chair, Prosperity 2020; Founder and Co-Managing Director, Mercato Partners; Chairman, Marketstar
  11. 11. Education – Prosperity 2020 Prosperit y 2020 BUSINESS SUPPORT Prosperity 2020 Founders Council Economic Development Corporation of Utah Friends of Utah Higher Education Governor's Office of Economic Development Junior Achievement of Utah United Way of Salt Lake Utah Foundation Utah Technology Council World Trade Center Utah Brigham City Area Chamber Cedar City Area Chamber ChamberWest Davis Chamber of Commerce East Valley Chamber Lehi Area Chamber of Commerce Moab Area Chamber of Commerce Murray Area Chamber of Commerce Ogden / Weber Chamber Park City Chamber Richfield Area Chamber Salt Lake Chamber Sandy Area Chamber of Commerce South Jordan Chamber of Commerce South Salt Lake Chamber Southwest Valley Chamber of Commerce St. George Chamber of Commerce Utah Valley Chamber of Commerce Wayne County Business Association West Jordan Chamber of Commerce P2020 Business Executive Council Chair: Alan Hall, MarketStar and Mercato Partners Gary Carlston, Senior Public Education Policy Advisor Jeff Alexander, Alexander's Print Advantage Scott Anderson, Zions Bank Lane Beattie, Salt Lake Chamber Bruce Bingham, Hamilton Partners Mark Bouchard, CBRE Jake Boyer, The Boyer Company Roger Boyer, The Boyer Company Scott Browne, Rio Tinto | Kennecott Lonnie M. Bullard, Jacobsen Construction Mona Burton, Holland & Hart Keith M. Buswell, Wadman Corporation Adam Chase, Chase Marketing Group Wilford Clyde, Clyde Companies Jeff Edwards, Economic Development Corporation of Utah Rick Folkerson, Ken Garff Automotive Group Kem Gardner, The Gardner Company David R. Golden, Wells Fargo Dan Harbeke, Union Pacific Carol Hunter Clark D. Ivory, Ivory Homes Ron Jibson, Questar Corporation Nolan Karras, The Karras Company, Inc. David Lang, Goldman Sachs Charlie Lansche, Fidelity Investments David Layton, Layton Construction Company Stan Lockhart, IM Flash Dan Lofgren, Cowboy Partners Brent Low, MediaOne of Utah Deborah Lux, ATK Rich McKeown, Leavitt Partners Robert Marquardt, Management & Training Corporation Jeff Nelson, Nelson Laboratories Scott Parson, Staker Parson Ray Pickup, WCF Greg Reid, SelectHealth Patricia Richards, SelectHealth Randy Shumway, Cicero Group Dr. Charles Sorenson, Intermountain Healthcare Gov. Olene Walker Bert R. Zimmerli, Intermountain Healthcare S alt L ake C hamber 2 0 1 4 P ublic P olicy G uide 9
  12. 12. nt study Utah Transportation 1.3 Billion for a total of $54.7 billion ons as growth jobs) Utah’s households and businesses over Coalition dditional GDP (Show X/Y Axis with a Arrow “Utah has a long history in disciplined planning ph - Keep from last yearand investment in ds of excess CO2 from congestion in the gy-Cloud with # in cloud) transportation. We need to continue this practice to ensure eline? our children can 1997enjoy economic 2013 prosperity and a high $24.5 Cents $24.5 Cents quality of life.” Statement of Principles City residents live near a transit stop (Bus $117,600 $169,000 H. David Burton, Co-Chair, Utah Transportation Coalition dex 163.4 ount on purpose) $1.17 286.9 $2.25 $450 $900 $4.50 $9.25 n Economic prosperity – A safe and efficient transportation system creates the foundation for economic growth and improved life quality. As the state population is expected to increase by 60 percent by 2040, we must ensure our state’s transportation system will be able to keep pace with population growth. n Core function of government – Creation and maintenance of infrastructure is a core responsibility of government. Utah’s elected and appointed officials exhibit economic leadership through their continued commitment to transportation investments. n Technological innovation – We embrace technological advances and design innovations that enhance the efficiency and safety of our transportation systems, expand their scope, improve user satisfaction and protect Utah’s air quality. n Utah’s Unified Transportation Plan – This consensus plan is a model for the nation and is our guiding vision for transportation in Utah. % Polic y Posit ion s n Disciplined planning – Utah’s dynamic growth requires a long-term view and stable, adequate funding. n Disciplined investment – Users should bear primary responsibility for funding Utah’s transportation infrastructure. User fees should be expanded in innovative ways in order to meet critical needs and should be indexed or otherwise adjusted over time to keep pace with inflation. 2014 Public Polic y Priorit ies n Meeting local transportation needs – Utah’s local roads are in critical need of preservation and maintenance. We support proposals that meet this need, enhance overall transportation spending and accomplish local road investments as called for in Utah’s Unified Transportation Plan. Financial c a se for Road maintenance Very Poor Rehabilitation Road Condition/ Maintenance Cost $ 6 Reconstruction Preservation $ $ 1 Very Good 0 5 10 Source: Utah Department of Transportation (UDOT) 10 S alt L ake C hamber 2 0 1 4 P ublic P olicy G uide 15 Years 20 10 25 30
  13. 13. UTAH Transportation Coalition n Comprehensive five-year transportation funding action – We commend the Utah legislature for its commitment to disciplined transportation planning and investment. We support fully funding the prioritized needs identified in Utah’s Unified Transportation Plan and support implementing, within the next five years, solutions to our $11.3 billion funding shortfall. n Investments in transit – The recent completions of major transit projects are only one component of a robust public transit system. We support continued investments in public transit as called for in Utah's Unified Transportation Plan. n Mountain transportation system – We support efforts to explore transportation options in the Wasatch Mountains that increase accessibility, are a net-positive for the environment, encourage transit, enhance Utah’s global brand, and pass a rigorous environmental and local process. n Grand Boulevards – Great cities have great boulevards. We support vital improvements to revitalize the main arteries in and out of Utah’s capital city, enhance safety and improve the perception of our state. n Airport rebuild – After decades of disciplined planning and leadership, this year the Salt Lake City International Airport will begin a $1.8 billion rebuild. The project will be funded without any increases in taxes or state funds. We support and applaud this effort. n Accessing energy in the Uinta Basin – Investment and development of Utah’s Uinta Basin is largely reliant on improvements to the area’s transportation and energy infrastructure. We support transportation and infrastructure investment in the Uinta Basin that increases accessibility, improves safety, protects the environment and responds to rural needs. Employers understand that failing to buckle up harms others on Utah’s roads. We support a primary seat belt law that will protect operators and passengers in vehicles. Wearing a seat belt prevents an occupant from harming others as a projectile and helps drivers better maintain control of their vehicles, making Utah's roads safer. are the single most effective traffic safety device for preventing death and injury 39 Estimated number of additional lives saved annually by a primary seat belt law.* In a crash, unbuckled passengers can become a projectile and increase the risk of hurting or killing others in a car by 40% * Based on 2012 statistics. Source: Zero Fatalities - A Utah Department of Transportation Program S alt L ake C hamber 2 0 1 4 P ublic P olicy G uide 11
  14. 14. UTAH Transportation Coalition Recent Accomplishments n Utah Transportation Coalition – Formerly the Utah Mobility Coalition, the Coalition re-launched in June of 2013 and has gained significant support. The Coalition works to ensure that through disciplined planning and investments, Utah will have a 21st century transportation system that enables residents to enjoy remarkable life quality and prosperity. 2040 Unif ie d P l a n Eco no m i c I m pac t st u dy An investment of an additional n Award-winning transportation talent – The Utah Department of Transportation was recently awarded the America’s Transportation Awards Grand Prize for the I-15 CORE project, which used innovative techniques to complete the $1.725 billion project two years ahead of schedule and $260 millionUNIFED PLAN LOGO: under budget. $11.3 Billion Economic development study n FrontLines 2015 – Utah Transit Authority (UTA) added 70 UNIFED PLAN LOGO: Economic development study new miles of rail, nearly two years additional $11.3 Billion for a total of $54.7 billion Invest an ahead of schedule and for a total of $54.7 billion in transportation funding more than $300 million under budget. Utahns can now Invest an additional $11.3 Billion for a total of $54.7 billion would... 182,618 Jobs (same Icons Draper, travel from Salt Lake City International Airport toas growth jobs) · $84.8 billion save Utah’s households and businesses over 182,618 Jobs (same Icons as growth jobs) Utah, and from Ogden from Daybreak to the University of (Piggy Bank) · $84.8 billion save Utah’s households and businesses over to Provo on transit. · $183.6 billion in additional GDP (Show X/Y Axis with a Arrow (Piggy Bank) Save Utah’s households and businesses more than · $183.6 billion in additional GDP a angle) n S-Line – The Sugar House Up at(Show X/Y Axis with athe Streetcar represents Arrow Up at a angle) revitalization of a storied history ofof Salt Lake City residents live near a transit stop (Bus · 89% streetcars · 89% of Salt Lake City residents live near a transit stop (Bus in Salt Lake City and is spurring more than $400 million in Stop Sign) Stop Sign) economic development along its route. · Item 1997 2013 % Item n GREENbike | SLC Bike Share – In its first season,1997 the Increase Increase Motor Fuel Tax $24.5 Cents more than 26,000 trips $24.5 Cents downtown bike share system had Tax Motor Fuel $24.5 Cents 0% with 320 annual and 6,000 unique daily users. The program 0% Median Home Price $117,600 $169,000 UNIFED 52,000 vehicle miles traveled, 14,000 car Median Home Price $117,600 reduced overPLAN LOGO: study 44% Economic development UDOT and offset 61,000 163.4 of 286.9 starts Construction Index for a 44%$54.7 of carbon emissions. The pounds billion Invest an additional $11.3 Billion total UDOT Construction Index 163.4 175% (Not a on purpose) 182,618 Jobs (same Icons as growth jobs) systemBreaddollar amount$1.17175%in 2014. will grow substantially (Not a dollar amount on purpose) Loaf of $2.25 n $84.8 Billion Preservation Graph - Keep from last year Preservation Graph - Keep from last year 2013 % Jobs $169,000 286.9 192% $1.17 Fleet conversions – Utah’sLoaf of Bread private fleets are public and Truck of Concrete $450192% $900 expanding to of Salt Lakeand other alternative fuels. These · 89% CNG City residents live near a transit stop (Bus 200% Truck of Concrete $450 Stop Sign) Movie Ticket $9.25 conversions decrease $4.50last year and 200% stabilize costs and improve · Preservation Graph - Keep from 205% Contribute more than $183.6 Billion $2.25 $900 $4.50 205% 182,618 $24.5 Cents · $84.8 billion save Utah’s households and businesses over (Piggy Bank) · $183.6 billion in additional GDP (Show X/Y Axis with a Arrow Up at a angle) our air quality. pounds of excess CO2Movie Ticket · 185 million from congestion in the Generate in additional GDP $9.25 Salt Lake Metro (Smoggy-Cloud with # in cloud) $24.5 Cents Road Condition/ Maintenance Cost Very Poor $169,000 Source: Economic Development Rehabilitation Research Group 6 Rehabilitation Full study is available at: www.utahtransportation.org Reconstruction Preservation $ $ Very Good THEN AND NOW: Very Poor 185 Million Make it look like a timeline? Item 1997 Increase Motor Fuel Tax $24.5 Cents 0% Median Home Price $117,600 44% UDOT Construction Index 163.4 175% (Not a dollar amount on purpose) Loaf of Bread $1.17 192% Truck of Concrete $450 200% Movie Ticket $4.50 205% 2013 % $ 0 5 286.9 $2.25 $900 $9.25 Very Poor Rehabilitation Road Condition/ Maintenance Cost $ 6 Reconstruction Preservation $ 1 $ Very Good 0 12 1 5 S alt L ake C hamber 2 0 1 4 P ublic P olicy G uide 10 15 Years 20 10 25 30 10 Road Condition/ Maintenance Cost · n Expanded transit pass access – The agreement between · 185 million pounds of Salt Lake City and UTA to providefrom congestion inat a reduced from congestion in the · 185 million pounds of excess CO2 transit passes theexcess CO2 Salt to all city (Smoggy-CloudSalt Lakecloud) (Smoggy-Cloud with # in cloud) Lake Metro residents is awith # in Metro rate first-in-the-nation approach. Additionally, there have been major strides through the THEN AND NOW: introduction of UTA’s Farepay electronic prepaid, reloadable THEN AND NOW: pay cards, and efforts of private and public employers to Make it look like a timeline? Make it look like a timeline? support access and utilization of transit. $ 6 10 Rec Preservation 20 15 Years $ 1 25 30 Estimated pounds of excess CO2 from traffic congestion in the Salt Lake Metro area in 2011 Very Good 0 5 10 Source: Texas A&M Transportation Institute (TTI) 15 Years 20
  15. 15. UTAH Transportation Coalition Utah's motor fuel tax has not increased since 1997 0 Increase % 44 175 Increase Increase 24.5¢ $117,600 1997 2013 1997 163.4 2013 Median Home Price 192 200 205 Increase Increase Increase 1997 $1.17 2013 UDOT Const. Index 1997 % $900 $2.25 286.9 $169.000 24.5¢ Motor Fuel Tax % % % % $9.25 $450 2013 Loaf of Bread 1997 $4.50 2013 Truck of Concrete 1997 2013 Movie Ticket Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics, Bureau of Economic and Business Research, Utah Department of Transportation Utah Tran sportat ion Coalit ion Member ship Chairs David R. Golden, Wells Fargo H. David Burton, Former Presiding Bishop of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Rich Thorn, Associated General Contractors of Utah John Tripi, Ames Construction Con Wadsworth, Ralph L. Wadsworth Construction Executive Committee Larry Anderson, Redmond Minerals Bob Bonar, Snowbird Ski & Summer Resort Paul Campbell, Wheeler Machinery Brad Chistofferson, Clyde Companies Scott Parson, Staker Parson Companies John Pfisterer, Komatsu Equipment Kyle Phillips, Herzog Contracting Corporation Mike Seare, Kiewit Brad Sweet, Granite Construction Strategic Members Ron Clegg, Parsons Brinkerhoff Clayton Gilliland, Stacy & Witbeck Richard Miller, PARSONS Supporting Members Bob Brenner, LiveView Technologies Clint Ensign, The Sinclair Companies Brent Jensen, HDR Michael King, Wilson and Company Michael S. Lasko, CH2M Hill Coalition Members Mike Alter, Kilgore Paving & Maintenance Ed Cooper, Ash Grove Cement TJ England, CR England - Global Transportation Mark Green, M.C. Green & Sons Chris Hipwell, Associated Builders and Contractors of Utah Syndee Jacques, Jacques & Associates Sean Jolly, Humana Jon Nelson, Harris Rebar Tyler Robirds, HW Lochner Brent Toller, Western Coating, Inc. Nathan Wickizer, Cache Valley Electric Alliance Members Associated Builders and Contractors of Utah American Council of Engineering Companies Associated General Contractors of Utah SkiUtah Utah Asphalt Paving Association Advisory Members Salt Lake City Utah League of Cities and Towns Utah Transit Authority Utah Department of Transportation Wasatch Front Regional Council If you are interested in the Utah Transportation Coalition, visit www.utahtransportation.org. S alt L ake C hamber 2 0 1 4 P ublic P olicy G uide 13
  16. 16. Natural Resource Business Council “Utah’s natural resources provide Utah families with unparalleled life quality and economic opportunities. We owe future generations our best stewardship efforts to ensure they enjoy the same advantages we now enjoy.” Senate President Wayne Niederhauser The Natural Resource Business Council represents an inclusive approach to multiple sectors of Utah’s economy. The Council is the guiding body for the water, clean air, energy and minerals, and outdoor recreation and tourism task forces. Statement of Principles n Stewardship – Utah’s spectacular natural environment is a legacy passed to us from preceding generations and is a key component of the state’s economy and high quality of life. Working together in long-term, prudent and proactive stewardships are vital in preserving these assets for future generations and driving economic growth. n Responsible utilization – Proper development and utilization of Utah’s natural resources promotes economic development and strengthens Utah. Polic y Posit ion s n Public lands – Utah has vast public lands set aside to benefit future generations. We support efforts to responsibly utilize Utah’s public lands and properly balance development and conservation. These efforts should be inclusive of all stakeholders and the public. n Sustainability – We will promote pro-business and pro-economy best practices focused on stewardship, utilization and sustainability of our natural resources. 14 S alt L ake C hamber 2 0 1 4 P ublic P olicy G uide
  17. 17. N a t u r a l Re s o u r c e s Water “The Salt Lake Chamber has a long history of being involved in water issues in Utah— from the formation of the Metropolitan Water District, to the construction of major water projects to use Utah’s allocation of the Colorado River. As our population continues to grow, the business community needs to engage in this issue more than ever.” Lane Beattie, President and CEO, Salt Lake Chamber “When the well runs dry, we’ll know the worth of water.” Ben Franklin Statement of Principles n Scarce resource – Utah faces dynamic growth and must judiciously utilize and wisely develop our water resources. Economic growth will be dramatically curtailed without prudent and swift action to invest in, conserve and manage this precious and limited resource. n Balance economic interests – Water is a key driver of Utah’s economy. It provides recreational opportunities and natural beauty that attracts great companies and employees. It keeps our communities vital and strong, and is an essential part of many business processes. We must thoughtfully approach how we manage our limited water to appropriately balance these economic interests.   n Private solutions – Conservation of water is good business. The Chamber is committed to promoting best practices and innovation in water utilization for businesses. 2014 Public Polic y Priorit ies n Disciplined planning and investment – Utah needs a long-term vision to meet our water needs and protect our water resources. We support efforts to identify and prioritize new infrastructure for Utah’s water resources, including the development of a state water strategy. n Conservation – We support continued efforts in promoting water conservation, including reducing per-capita consumption by 25 percent by the year 2025 (as compared to the year 2000). S alt L ake C hamber 2 0 1 4 P ublic P olicy G uide 15
  18. 18. N a t u r a l Re s o u r c e s Clean Air “For many Utahns, clean air is the state’s most pressing issue. Cleaning the air will require each of us to do our part.” Robert Grow, President and Chief Executive Officer, Envision Utah Statement of Principles n Balance economic interests – We must carefully address air quality issues while minimizing the cost to business. Without action, we may lose federal highway funding, garner additional regulatory burdens, and impair economic development and corporate recruitment. n Private sector solutions – Clean air makes good business sense and the business community will be a significant part of the solution. We are committed to private sector initiatives to promote and recognize voluntary clean air practices for businesses. n Personal responsibility – We all have a role in keeping our air clean. Businesses, citizens and government share our roads and breathe the same air. We all should do our part to clean our air. Polic y Posit ion s n Federal regulatory compliance – Utah must meet current federal air quality standards. Reaching compliance will limit regulatory burdens on businesses and help secure future federal highway funding. We remain actively engaged and supportive of the PM2.5 State Implementation Plan and support the proposed Tier 3 Vehicle Emissions and Fuel Standards Program. n Economic development – Our air quality has lasting implications on our state’s ability to retain and attract new businesses and employees. We view efforts to clean Utah’s air through a lens of economic development. 2014 Public Polic y Priorit ies n Transportation funding – Mobile emissions, specifically from idling, are a significant contributor to Utah’s air quality challenges. We support increased transportation funding to improve our transit system and reduce idling on Utah's roadways. n Cleaner vehicles – We support efforts and incentives to convert a significant amount of state and private sector fleets to cleaner vehicles. We also support increasing the availability of natural gas and electric vehicle fueling and charging stations. n Public awareness and research – We support efforts to help Utah residents better understand the causes and effects of poor air, including funding research and promoting voluntary actions to improve air quality. n Collaborative efforts – We support the efforts by the governor, Legislature, UCAIR and Envision Utah to work with key stakeholders to craft solutions to improve Utah’s air. n Small business focus – We support public policy that facilitates small business participation in emission reductions and minimizes costs incurred as a result of further regulations. 16 S alt L ake C hamber 2 0 1 4 P ublic P olicy G uide
  19. 19. N a t u r a l Re s o u r c e s 72 # Number of Champions Five Year Impact of Clear Air Challenge Recent Accomplishments Saved n National recognition – The Chamber’s Clean Air Champions program was recognized as one of the 10 most innovative chamber programs to promote clean energy and energy efficiency. n Clear the Air Challenge – In its fifth year, 8,500 Utahns participated in the month-long campaign to drive less and drive smarter. In 2013, more than 1.9 million miles and nearly 170,000 vehicle trips were saved collectively. n Transit passes – Several new initiatives through innovative partnerships debuted to encourage more Utahns to use public transit. All Salt Lake City residents will receive heavily discounted passes. Zions Bank sponsored the RideClear pass program. UTA introduced the Farepay Card, a more convenient way to pay transit fares with prepaid, reloadable cards. Saved 7.1 Million T r av e l M I LE S 14,033 Cold Starts Avoided 9 Million Pounds of CO2 600,000 Car Trips 95% of participants engage through their employer Source of Wasatch Front PM2.5 Emissions 32% 11% Area Sources Point n Last mile – Two programs will help more Utahns utilize transit as an option for commuting. GREENbike | SLC Bike Share and Enterprise CarShare provide commuters with access to transportation in order to reach their final destinations via transit. 61,108 Eliminated 57% Mobile 5,000 Number of RideClear one week complimentary TRAX passes Carbon Offset of 320 Annual Users 120,000 Number of cars off the road along Wasatch Front due to transit commuters 1.5 Auto Travel Lanes Saved by UTA Commuters Along I-15 Corridor Source: Clear Air Challenge, Utah Department of Environment Quality, Utah Transit Authority (UTA), GreenBike | SLC Bike Share Cle an Air Ta sk Force Member ship Chair: Jonathan Johnson, Overstock.com Desmond J. Barker, Jr., Des Barker Associates Steve Bergstrom, Intermountain Healthcare Kip Billings, Wasatch Front Regional Council Douglas Carver, Carver Energy Services Jen Colby, University of Utah Jim Crowder, Enterprise Holdings, Inc. Mike Dalley, Staker Parson Companies Quinn Dietlein, Hale Centre Theatre Jeff Edwards, Economic Development Corporation of Utah Robin Erickson, Utah Clean Cities Coalition Andrew Gruber, Wasatch Front Regional Council Greg Hardy, Chevron Robert Paine III M.D., University of Utah - Program for Air Quality, Health, and Society Sophia Jackson, Utah Clean Cities Coalition Kerry E. Kelly, University of Utah - Program for Air Quality, Health, and Society G.J. LaBonty, Utah Transit Authority Rich Lambert, Wells Fargo Lance Lawrence, Kiewit Kate Lilja, City of Salt Lake Jesse Mangum, Jones Lang LaSalle Erin Mendenhall, Breathe Utah Christine Osborne, Utah Division of Air Quality Angelo Papastamos, UDOT TravelWise E. Blaine Rawson, Ray Quinney & Nebeker Stephen Sands, Kennecott Utah Copper Corporation Elizabeth Schulte, Parsons Behle & Latimer Sheldon Seitz, After Hours Medical Company Matt Sibul, Utah Transit Authority Brett Slack, Comcast Cable Communications Justin Smart, Penna Powers Brian Haynes Pike Sowle, Goldman, Sachs & Co. R. Tee Spjute, Shumway Van & Hansen Robert Storey, Zions Bank Ryan Streams, USTAR Shawn Teigan, Utah Foundation Shelly Cordon Teuscher, Parsons Behle & Latimer Sherry Weaver, Canyons Resort S alt L ake C hamber 2 0 1 4 P ublic P olicy G uide 17
  20. 20. N a t u r a l Re s o u r c e s Energy & Minerals “Responsible development of Utah’s natural resources will fuel Utah’s economy. I am committed to cultivating productive partnerships with the private sector to make this happen.” Statement of Principles Governor Gary R. Herbert n Energy and mineral development – Utah has vast and diverse energy and mineral resources. We support policies that encourage and facilitate appropriate energy and mineral production, and that preserve and strengthen Utah’s competitive advantages. n Responsible utilization – We support the balanced development of Utah’s rich energy and mineral resources. Development and wise use of these essential resources ensures access to reasonably priced energy, creates jobs and provides a solid foundation for broader economic strength. n Stewardship – Utah’s spectacular natural environment is a legacy passed to us from preceding generations. We support conservation as well as innovative and environmentally responsible development of energy and mineral resources and infrastructure. Polic y Posit ion s n Greenhouse gas – Global warming requires global solutions. Any proposed federal regulation of greenhouse gases must be designed to prevent the transfer of economic wealth from Utah to other states or nations, minimize economic hardship on businesses and consumers, and allow for alternative means of compliance. Utah should not participate in regional greenhouse gas initiatives. n Nuclear – We support development of nuclear power if economically viable, including the assessment of economic risks and a policy for safely storing or reprocessing locally produced spent fuel. 2014 Public Polic y Priorit ies n Responsive regulation – We support regulations that encourage capital investment, remove uncertainty, improve transparency, reduce the burden on business and protect the environment. Additionally, rate setting should acknowledge the full cost of our energy infrastructure and distribution. n Energy efficiency – We support and will champion efforts to engage and educate businesses on energy efficiency and cost-effective energy options. n Accessing energy in the Uinta Basin – Investment and development of Utah’s Uinta Basin is largely reliant on improvements to the area’s transportation and energy infrastructure. We support transportation and infrastructure investment in the Uinta Basin that increases accessibility, improves safety, protects the environment and is responsive to rural needs. n Rural economic development – We recognize the vital role rural communities and businesses play in Utah’s economy, specifically in the energy and mineral sectors. We are committed to honoring and supporting rural development efforts, including advancing infrastructure in these areas. 18 S alt L ake C hamber 2 0 1 4 P ublic P olicy G uide
  21. 21. N a t u r a l Re s o u r c e s Utah Mining/Minerals 291 30,690 Mining operations Direct jobs Utah’s Energy Competitive Advantage 5th lowest average energy prices in the nation 20,073,000 9 # $5.6 Billion short tons of coal produced (2011) 13,294 “Clean vehicles” in use Natural gas producing state Economic value generated 187 $29 Billion % Possible lost production due to transportation limitations in the Uinta Basin Increase in megawatts generated from renewable sources 2006-2010 11 # 88 CNG gas stations Crude oil producing state (2,816,000 barrels) Source: National Mining Association, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Utah Department of Transportation Energy & Minerals Ta sk Force Chair: Dr. Laura Nelson, Potash Ridge Desmond J. Barker, Jr., Des Barker Associates Kimberly Barnett, Salt Lake County Rep. Roger E. Barrus, Utah State House of Representatives John Baza, Utah Division of Oil, Gas and Mining Mayor Ralph Becker, City of Salt Lake Todd Bingham, Utah Manufacturers Association Mike Bodell, Bodell Construction Bob Bonar, Snowbird Ski & Summer Resort Mark Brennan, Ames Construction Kenneth Bullock, Utah League of Cities & Towns Rey Butcher, Questar Corporation Bradley Cahoon, Snell & Wilmer LLP Douglas Carver, Carver Energy Services Steven J. Christiansen, Parr Brown Gee & Loveless Mark Compton, Utah Mining Association Denise Dragoo, Snell & Wilmer LLP Alair Emory, Governor's Office of Energy Fred Ferguson, Congressman Rob Bishop First District of Utah Brandon Finch, Kiewit Kelly Francone, Energy Strategies LLC Christian Gardner, Gardner Company Nick Goodman, CYRQ Energy Matt Greene, Red Leaf Resources Scott Hardy, Cicero Group Jeff Hartley, Red Leaf Resources Tim Homer, Wasatch Electric Gary Hoogeveen, Kern River Gas Transmission Company Rikki L. Hrenko, Enefit American Oil Tiffany A. James, Magnum Energy Kevin Jensen, After Hours Medical Company David Jensen, Utah Property Managment Associates Ron Jibson, Questar Corporation Samantha Mary Julian, Governor's Office of Energy Chane Kellerstrass, Kellerstrass Oil Company John S. Kirkham, Stoel Rives Christopher Kirkpatrick, Enterprise Holdings, Inc. Dennis Klaus, Salt Lake Community College Scott Lamb, Wadsworth Development Group Rich Lambert, Wells Fargo Justin Lawrence, Tesoro Refining & Marketing Tammie Lucero, Uintah County Economic Development Ron Mangone, Strong & Hanni Duane Marsala, Marsala & Co Nathan Marsala, Marsala & Co Mike McKee, Uintah County Economic Development Kirk Morgan, Ferguson Enterprises, Inc. Scott W. Parson, Staker Parson Companies Scott Peters, Environmental Planning Group, LLC Gibson Peters, Governor's Office of Energy Ray Pickup, WCF Monica Rafferty, Coldwell Banker Commercial Bob Reeder, Parsons Behle & Latimer Debra Rigby, Questar Corporation Reed Searle, EnergySolutions Brad Shafer, Rocky Mountain Power Amanda Smith, Department of Environmental Quality Cody Stewart, Governor's Office Ryan Streams, USTAR Greg Sutherland, Senator Mike Lee David L. Taylor, Rocky Mountain Power Shawn Teigan, Utah Foundation Chad Teply, Rocky Mountain Power Shelly Teuscher, Parsons Behle & Latimer Roger O. Tew, VanCott Brok Thayn, Hunt Electric, Inc. Kevin Townsend, Merrill Lynch Wick Udy, Jones Lang LaSalle Michael Vaughan, Rio Tinto - Kennecott Utah Copper A. Richard Walje, Rocky Mountain Power Alan J. Walker, Utah Energy Triangle (USTAR) Alan Westenskow, Zions Bank Brian Wilkinson, Wilkinson Ferrari & Co. Maura Yates, SunEdison S alt L ake C hamber 2 0 1 4 P ublic P olicy G uide 19
  22. 22. N a t u r a l Re s o u r c e s Outdoor Recreation & Tourism "Utah's world-class outdoor recreation and tourism fuel our economy and create a great quality of life. For Utahns, life elevated is more than a brand — it’s our way of life.” Vicki Varela, Managing Director of Tourism, Film and Global Branding, State of Utah  Statement of Principles n Economic value – Outdoor recreation and tourism represent robust business sectors that benefit both urban and rural Utah. We view efforts to enhance these industries as vital to economic development. n Responsible stewardship – Utah’s spectacular natural environment is a legacy passed to us from preceding generations. We support conservation as well as firstrate access to Utah’s great outdoors for recreation. n National and state parks – Utah’s national and state parks attract millions of visitors annually, and are a significant contribution to urban and rural Utah. We support policy to enhance and promote these precious natural resources. 2014 Public Polic y Priorit ies n Industry Task Force – The Salt Lake Chamber will form an outdoor recreation and tourism industry task force to support and foster growth in these key sectors of our economy. We value and will collaborate with key partners, including the Governor’s Office of Economic Development, Office of Outdoor Recreation, Office of Global Branding, Tourism and Film, SkiUtah, Utah Tourism Industry Coalition, and Visit Salt Lake, among others. n Life Elevated® – Utah is competing on a global stage for tourism, business and investment. We support additional funding to promote Utah’s natural beauty to attract tourism and businesses. We also support long-term efforts and commitments to expand Utah’s tourism marketing, including the Tourism Marketing Performance Fund (TMPF). n Mountain transportation system – We support efforts to explore transportation options in the Wasatch Mountains that increase accessibility, are a net-positive for the environment, encourage transit, enhance Utah’s global brand, and pass a rigorous environmental and local process. 7.4 Billion $ Traveler spending for 2012 20 S alt L ake C hamber 2 0 1 4 P ublic P olicy G uide 1.2 Billion $ Consumer spending on outdoor products
  23. 23. N a t u r a l Re s o u r c e s More than 200,000 direct jobs in outdoor recreation, travel and tourism-related industries in Utah 14 Utah’s osted ski resorts h Million 4 17.6 Million recreation visits were made to Utah’s five national parks, seven national monuments, two national recreation areas, one national historic site and 43 state parks Source: Utah Office of Tourism, Outdoor Industry Association 13 season g the 2012r days durin skie $ 1 $ 1 $ 1 1$ $ 1 1 $ For every $1 invested in advertising the average 2012 ROI in tax dollars to the state was 5.42 $ S alt L ake C hamber 2 0 1 4 P ublic P olicy G uide 21
  24. 24. Health System Reform “Utah’s health system is the envy of the nation. By partnering with employers, we can continue to improve our health system and provide even better outcomes at lower costs.” Greg Bell, President and CEO, Utah Hospital Association Statement of Principles n Reform based on market principles – We support reform that applies market principles to contain costs and improve health. Such reform includes increasing transparency of cost and quality, as well as fostering competition and providing incentives for patients, doctors, hospitals and insurers to utilize resources in ways that lead to measurably better outcomes. n Controlling costs – We support bold action to contain unsustainable health care costs. n Health of Utahns – A healthy workforce is necessary to a productive business community. We support reform that addresses the growing epidemic of obesity and lifestyle-induced diseases and results in better health for Utahns. Polic y Posit ion s n The Health System Reform Business Bill of Rights and Responsibilities summarizes the Chamber’s position on health system reform efforts and is available at www.slchamber.com/healthreform. 2014 Public Polic y Priorit ies n Medicaid expansion – We favor a measured approach to Medicaid expansion that recognizes the necessity of balancing the financial resources of the state with the needs of Utahns. Our community is stronger when we provide access to health coverage for the poorest among us. This measured approach also includes efforts to apply market principles to Medicaid expansion, such as utilizing Medicaid dollars through the employer market or a health insurance exchange. n Repeal of the Medical Device Tax – We support the repeal of the 2.3 percent medical device excise tax on gross revenue that was passed in the Affordable Care Act. This tax will impede American innovation that creates jobs and saves lives. It will also result in layoffs at medical device manufacturing companies. n Avenue H – We support Utah's small business health insurance marketplace as a significant option for meeting employer and employee needs for health insurance n Autism treatment – Autism spectrum disorders impact all Utahns. We support informed action that helps address this very real problem. The cost of addressing these disorders should be shared by all Utahns and should not be financed through an insurance mandate. n Directly engage employers – As the largest payer in the health system, employers must strategically expend financial resources. In 2014, we will facilitate employer engagement in health care spending to control costs and increase quality. Furthermore, we will continue to improve the Employer Toolbox, which has become a vital resource for employers. www.slchamber.com/toolbox 22 S alt L ake C hamber 2 0 1 4 P ublic P olicy G uide
  25. 25. H e a lt h S y s t e m Re f o r m 90 Lowest health care costs in the nation % 2 # Invest an additional $11.3 Billion for a total of $54.7 billion $1,800 182,618 Jobs (same Icons as growth jobs) · $84.8 billion save Utah’s households and businesses over (Piggy Bank) · $183.6 billion in additional GDP (Show X/Y Axis with a Arrow Up at a angle) · 89% of Salt Lake City residents live near a transit stop (Bus Stop Sign) · Preservation Graph - Keep from last year · 185 million pounds of excess CO2 from congestion in the Salt Lake Metro (Smoggy-Cloud with # in cloud) Amount Utahns spend per capita on health care THEN AND NOW: Make it look like a timeline? –substantially Item 1997 Increase Motor Fuel Tax $24.5 Cents 0% Median Home Price $117,600 44% UDOT Construction Index 163.4 175% (Not a dollar amount on purpose) Loaf of Bread $1.17 192% Truck of Concrete $450 200% Movie Ticket $4.50 205% 2013 % $24.5 Cents $169,000 286.9 less than the national average $2.25 $900 $9.25 Very Poor of Chamber members feel that providing health care coverage for their employees is very important State for employer sponsored coverage Rehabilitation $ Road Condition/ Maintenance Cost 1 # UNIFED PLAN LOGO: Economic development study 6 Sixth healthiest state Reconstruction Preservation $ Very Good 0 $ 1 5 10 15 Years 20 10 25 30 Source: Kaiser Family Foundation, Salt Lake Chamber, United Health Foundation He alth System Reform Ta sk Force Co-chair: Marc Bennett, Healthinsight Co-chair: Andrew Croshaw, Leavitt Partners Past chair: Rich McKeown, Leavitt Partners Nancy Adams, LDS Hospital Dr. Ted Adams, LDS Hospital Clay Alger, Shumway Van & Hansen Ron Andus, McKesson Pharmacuetical Verna Askwig, Wadsworth Development Group Heather Austin, Utah Transit Authority Bill Barnes, Intermountain Healthcare William J. Biddle, BC Technical, Inc. Doug Boudreaux, MountainStar - HCA Mountain Division Terry H. Buckner, The Buckner Company David J. Castleton, Ray Quinney & Nebeker Sen. Allen Christensen, Utah State Senate Bill D. Crim, United Way of Salt Lake Jennifer B. Danielson, Regence BlueCross BlueShield of Utah Chris DeLaMare, Gold Cross Services Sheryl Dobson-Wainwright, SDW consultants Nathan Dorsey, Shumway Van & Hansen Teresa Ellis, Regence BlueCross BlueShield of Utah David Entwistle, University of Utah Hospitals and Clinics Michael Erdmann, RBM Building Services Inc. Christian Gardner, Gardner Company Jerianne Gerloff, Pfizer Inc. David Gessel, UHA, Utah Hospitals & Health Systems Association Paul Glauser, Staker Parson Companies Terry Graft, Wal-Mart Stores John Hanshaw, MountainStar - HCA Mountain Division R. Kelly Harris, Harris Financial Utah Tim Homer, Wasatch Electric Earl Hurst, Moreton & Company Scott Hymas, RC Willey Home Furnishings Emily Jackson, Snell & Wilmer LLP Lynda Jeppesen, Larry H. Miller Group of Companies Fred Lampropoulos, Merit Medical Systems, Inc. Gary Larcenaire, Valley Behavioral Health David D. Larsen, Aerojet Rocketdyne Corporation Eric Leavitt, Leavitt Group R. Chet Loftis, PEHP Nancy Malecker, Utah Transit Authority Pete McCabe, GE Healthcare Surgery James McDougal, Light Touch Medical Aesthetics Janet Metcalf, The Buckner Company Stephan Micklos, Merrill Lynch Donna Milavetz, MD, MPH, OnSite Care Scott Milton, UPS Doug Moody, Solution Services, Inc. William Moreton, Moreton & Company Dr. Sean J. Mulvihill, University of Utah Kathleen Murphy, Regence BlueCross BlueShield of Utah Steve Neeleman, HealthEquity Meredith Nickle, Enterprise Holdings, Inc. Teri Olsen, University of Utah Scott W. Parson, Staker Parson Companies Scarlett Pate, Bonneville International Corporation David Patton, Utah Department of Health Ray Pickup, WCF Greg Poulsen, Intermountain Healthcare Russ Raddon, Humana Brandon Rawlins, Jones Lang LaSalle Chris Redgrave, Zions Bank Patricia Richards, SelectHealth Janet Root, PhD, Utah Health Information Network Rep. Dean Sanpei, Utah State House of Representatives Lindsey Shumway, Shumway Van & Hansen Cheryl Smith, Questar Corporation Dana Smith, Dental Select Michael Sonntag, Bear River Mutual Insurance Company Mark Stimpson, Regence BlueCross BlueShield of Utah Jill Taylor, KeyBank of Utah Shelly Teuscher, Parsons Behle & Latimer Norman Thurston, Utah Department of Health Steven E. Tyler, Holland & Hart Dr. Rachot Vacharothone, After Hours Medical Company David P. Vanderwarker, Regence BlueCross BlueShield of Utah Blake Watkins, Gallagher Benefit Services, Inc Nathan Wickizer, Cache Valley Electric Company Gary Wight, Kipp and Christian, P.C. Trent Wignall, Parallel HR Solutions, Inc. JaeLynn Williams, 3M Health Information Systems Roberta Williams, American Express Centurion Bank Suzanne Winters, USTAR S alt L ake C hamber 2 0 1 4 P ublic P olicy G uide 23
  26. 26. Downtown "Salt Lake City is a major gateway to the rest of Utah. Bringing visitors to Salt Lake City and the rest of the state enhances our visibility and reputation as business and family friendly. As we continue to focus on energy and technology development, we must also strengthen tourism.” Speaker Rebecca Lockhart Statement of Principles n Statewide economic and cultural center – A vibrant metropolitan center is an important economic engine for the entire region. Downtown Salt Lake City is the regional metropolitan center for culture, commerce and entertainment. Celebrating a long legacy as Utah’s historic center for finance, law, media and creative enterprise, downtown has reinvented itself in a dramatic transformation over the past decade. n Downtown development – In partnership with the Downtown Alliance, we support investments and policies that reinforce downtown Salt Lake City’s position as a regional urban center for culture, commerce and entertainment. 2014 Public Polic y Priorit ies n Convention industry – The Salt Lake Chamber encourages policies that promote the growth of our state’s convention and tourism industries. To that end, we support a convention center hotel so long as the financing is privately led. Public financial support should be devoted to a public purpose, and be limited and consistent with financing used for other significant privately led projects in Salt Lake City. We also support local and state policies that create a more welcoming and vibrant nightlife experience for locals and visitors alike. n Dynamic urban living – We encourage policies and investments that support downtown’s role as a vibrant and diverse residential community. We oppose local regulations, taxes or fees that discourage private investment in urban residential projects. n Depot District – The Gateway development created a strong foundation for this burgeoning entrepreneurial district. Private and public resources should continue to be devoted to transit-oriented development. We support new resources and approaches to help service providers and their clients address issues of homelessness and vagrancy. A public market will also act as a catalyst for transforming this important neighborhood. n Grand Boulevards District – The Grand Boulevards act as the main arteries in and out of Utah’s capital city, serving thousands of drivers every day. State Street, 400 South, Beck Street, 500 South and 600 South require a consensus-driven, strategic approach along with additional public and private investment to create a more dignified, green and monumental entrance for Utah’s urban center. n Regional rail – Great progress has been made on regional rail that connects downtown to the Wasatch Front. We support future projects, such as a downtown streetcar and connector, which will spur further infill development and better connect residents, workers and visitors to downtown destinations. We also support further expansion of the GREENbike | SLC Bike Share program as an integral part of regional transit. 24 S alt L ake C hamber 2 0 1 4 P ublic P olicy G uide
  27. 27. 30 20 Downtown 10 0 1980 100 1990 90 100 2000 100 88.4% 100 79.0% 80 2012 77.6% Percent of 70 population living in urban areas 88.4% in Utah 90 90 60 79.0% 79.0% 80 80 100 77.6% 76.2% 77.6% 76.2% 50 88.4% 7090 70 40 79.0% 30 6080 20 5070 10 4060 77.6% 40 88.4% 1980 30 0 3050 76.2% 2040 1990 76.2% 79.0% 80 77.6% 46.5 76.2% 1980 2000 88.4% Convention Industry 70 60 50 40 30 2000 10 2012 0 10 0 1980 70 79.0% 77.6% 60 $298,082,850 40 2012 30 20 0 1990 1980 2000 1990 2000 Downtown Resident Goals 5,000 2000 90 80 10 0 1990 1980 1980 100 50 1990 10 020 % of attendees estimated to return after attending a convention 20 20 1030 1990 60 77.6% 50 88.4% 90 76.2% 2012 2000 2012 *Based on lost city-wide conventions and average visitor spending habits during convention stays 10,000 2012 2013 1990 2010-2013 total lost business without convention hotel* 2012 2020 100 80 .6 Milolitoln $793 a 88.4% 90 79.0% 70 60 50 40 30 20 77.6% 10 0 20,000 2040 Source: Downtown Alliance, Visit Salt Lake, Utah Department of Transportation, Utah Tax Commission 1980 1990 76.2% $781,793,600 013 t 2012-2 struction con under- roject value p or new owntown in d 2000 2012 2012 select retail sales 94,000 Daily commutes on 500 and 600 south Recent Accomplishments n City of learning – Neumont University, a leading computer science institution, relocated its Utah campus into the former Salt Lake Tribune building at 143 S. Main and opened its doors in June of 2013. The building was renovated to contain 16 high-tech classrooms, labs, common areas and housing for more than 85 students. Located in the heart of downtown, the project contributes vibrancy and youth, bringing 500 students daily to downtown’s active atmosphere. We also value downtown’s relationship with Salt Lake Community College, LDS Business College, Brigham Young University and the University of Utah. n Public Safety Building – Opening in summer of 2013, the new Public Safety Building is the first public safety building in the nation to generate as much energy as it uses. It houses Salt Lake City Police, Fire, SLC 911 Dispatch and an Emergency Operations Center. n Arts and cultural facilities – Downtown is home to worldclass arts and cultural facilities, continuing to expand and improve its venues. In 2013, Ballet West and the Salt Lake County Center for the Arts formed a partnership to renovate The Capitol Theatre and build a $33.4 million addition adjacent to the existing historical theatre. Design plans for the $116 million new Utah Performing Arts Center design were unveiled in April of 2013 with the project set to break ground in January of 2014. Downtown Alliance Board of Trustees Leaders Lane Beattie, President and CEO, Salt Lake Chamber / Downtown Alliance Peggy Lander, Chair, Downtown Alliance Jason Mathis, Executive Director, Downtown Alliance Downtown Alliance Board of Trustees Christy Alter, Goldman, Sachs & Co. Lane Beattie, Salt Lake Chamber Jake Boyer, The Boyer Company Bruce Bingham, Hamilton Partners John Dahlstrom, Wasatch Properties Jim Divver, Zions Bank Kent Gibson, Capstone Management David R. Golden, Wells Fargo Molly Mazzolini, Infinite Scale Design Jim Olson, Utah Jazz Gary Porter, The Church of Jesus 
Christ of Latter-day Saints Vasilios Priskos, InterNet Properties Linda Wardell, City Creek Center Ex Officio Board Members D.J. Baxter, Redevelopment Agency of Salt Lake City Scott Beck, Visit Salt Lake Mayor Ralph Becker, Salt Lake City Babs Delay, Downtown Retail Merchants Association Council Member Luke Garrott, Salt Lake City Council Mayor Ben McAdams, Salt Lake County S alt L ake C hamber 2 0 1 4 P ublic P olicy G uide 25 20
  28. 28. International “Every major policy issue supported by the Salt Lake Chamber is critical to Utah’s international competitiveness. Whether it be health care costs, infrastructure, education, water, clean air, energy or other pressing issues, they are all key ingredients to succeeding in the global marketplace.” Scott Anderson, Chair, World Trade Center Utah, CEO, Zions Bank Statement of Principles n Open markets – We support public policy that encourages open markets and the full participation of Utah businesses in the global marketplace. n Global perspective – Public policy must take into account the global nature of competition and empower Utah businesses to succeed in the world economy. 
 2014 Public Polic y Priorit ies n Transportation infrastructure – The efficient movement of goods, services and people throughout our economy is a key driver to our international competitiveness. We support efforts to sustain and enhance our international competitiveness through 20 disciplined investments in our transportation infrastructure, including our international airport, freight ways, highways and .8 13 roads, and transit system. 15 19.2 n Invest in education – Utah’s greatest export is the minds0of our youth. 1 .3 10 We must continue to prioritize the education of the next workforce to stay competitive. We support efforts to invest in Utah's education 6.8 system, specifically in STEM, and also 5 provide better access to to international learning. 2010 2012 2008 0 2–6 n Business exposure to international opportunities00The future growth of Utah’s exports and competitive advantages rely on global partnerships. We support continued efforts to build these partnerships through the Governor’s Office of Economic Development and World Trade Center Utah via trade missions, hosting dignitaries and providing seminars on international trade opening markets, building relationships and creating jobs. Crossroads of the World Utah's Total Value of Merchandise E xports 20 19.2 15 13.8 20 10 15 5 Utah is a leader in logistics 0 10 19.2 6.8 13.8 2006 2008 10.3 2010 2012 Billions of Dollars 5 26 10.3 6.8 Source: International Trade Administration S alt L ake C hamber 2 0 1 4 P ublic P olicy G uide 0 2006 2008 2010 2012
  29. 29. I n t e r n at io n a l 20 15 10 1 20 6.8 5 15 20 0 20 19.2 19.2 15 13.8 10 10.3 6.8 5 20 2006 2008 5 2012 5 2010 0 15 13.8 10 5 13.8 19.2 15 10 0 20 15 20 10 19.2 0 10 2008 10 2006 2008 2010 2012 Utah Companies Export Civilian Aircraft Parts UK I Hong Kong I Canada $16 Billion 350,000 Salt Lake City Metro Exports 2008 2010 Utah Jobs Connected to Trade 2012 2012 Food Products Travel Top Countries for Trade: + 2010 Utah’s Top Service Exports 2006 Primary Computer/Electronic Chemicals Metals Products 3,500 2008 6.8 0 2008 10.3 10.3 5 2006 19.2 6.8 0 2008 2010 2012 2012 13.8 2010 2006 2006 2006 0 10.3 5 6.8 15 6.8 5 15 10.3 6.8 6.8 19.2 13.8 10.3 13.8 20 Utah’s Top Merchandise Exports 0 200610.3 2 10 I India I China Salt Lake Foreign Trade Zone Software 130 Languages Spoken 20,000 Dual Immersion Students Learning Spanish, Chinese, French and Portuguese Source: International Trade Administration, Business Roundtable, University of Utah, Utah State Office of Education World Trade Center Utah Board of Director s Chair: A. Scott Anderson, Zions Bank, Chair Vice chair: Lew Cramer, Coldwell Banker Commercial Intermountain Lane Beattie, Salt Lake Chamber Dave Clark, Zions Bank Gary Crittenden, Huntsman Gay Global Capital Spencer P. Eccles, Governor's Office of Economic Development Mark Garfield, Zions Bank Natalie Gochnour, Salt Lake Chamber, University of Utah Dean Luikart, Wells Fargo Greg Miller, Larry H. Miller Group of Companies Gary Porter, LDS Church Paul Savage, Kirton & McConkie Ex Officio Jeff Edwards, Economic Development Corporation of Utah Richard Nelson, Utah Technology Council S alt L ake C hamber 2 0 1 4 P ublic P olicy G uide 27
  30. 30. Immigration “Utah businesses are counting on our elected leaders in Washington to act on immigration reform. An improved immigration system is critical to the well-being and future growth of our economy.” Statement of Principles n The Utah Compact – The five principles articulated in the Utah Compact remain our guiding principles in regard to immigration reform. The full text of the compact is available at www.utahcompact.com. Polic y Posit ion s n Mandatory electronic verification – We support a national electronic verification system for new employees that reduces the existing regulatory burden on businesses and includes national visa reform. We oppose revocation of business licenses as a penalty for non-compliance. 2014 Public Polic y Priorit ies n Federal solutions – Immigration is a federal issue. We call on our federal delegation to fix America’s broken immigration system and advance broad immigration reform that is consistent with the principles of the Utah Compact. n Western States Coalition – Utah’s neighboring states have taken a similar stance towards the immigration discussion. We will work to build a coalition with business, political and religious leaders in Idaho, Nevada, Montana, New Mexico, Wyoming, Colorado and Arizona that supports federal immigration reform. Chris Gamvroulas, President, Ivory Development 24,807 Estimated number of jobs immigration reform would create in Utah Source: American Action Network Immigrat ion Ta sk Force Member ship Chair: Timothy M. Wheelwright, Durham Jones & Pinegar, P.C. Carlos Alegre, Granite Construction Company Jeff Alexander, Alexander's Print Advantage Michael Arrett, Northwood Dairy Sales Brian Bethers, 1-800-Contacts Todd R. Bingham, Utah Manufacturers Association Jake Boyer, The Boyer Company Mark Brennan, Ames Construction Lonnie M. Bullard, Jacobsen Construction Company Patrick Burt, Kipp and Christian, P.C. Diego H. Carroll, Parsons Brinckerhoff Wilford Clyde, Clyde Companies 28 Mark Compton, Utah Mining Association Spencer P. Eccles, Eccles Foundation Clint W. Ensign, Sinclair Companies Elizabeth Garbe, United Way of Salt Lake Bryson Garbett, Garbett Homes Sharon Garn, Senator Orrin G. Hatch Terry Grant, Wells Fargo Tom Guinney, Gastronomy Tyler Harvey, Wells Fargo Chris Hipwell, ABC-Associated Builders and Contractors, Inc. Tom N. Hori, REDCON Clark D. Ivory, Ivory Homes Jonathan Johnson, Overstock.com Jason Keith, Enterprise Holdings, Inc. S alt L ake C hamber 2 0 1 4 P ublic P olicy G uide Bill Lee, Senator Mike Lee Ted McAleer, USTAR Roger J. McConkie, Prince Yeates Lynn C. McMurray, Kirton McConkie Barbara Melendez, Kuck Immigration Partners Doug Moody, Solution Services, Inc. Kirk Morgan, Ferguson Enterprises, Inc. David Nixon, Jones Lang LaSalle Brett Okland, Okland Construction Company Genevie Olivares, Shumway Van & Hansen Roger Parsell, Sysco Intermountain Scott W. Parson, Staker Parson Companies Ray Pickup, WCF Stan Rasmussen, Sutherland Institute Mike Reberg, Matheson, Jim Alan Rindlisbacher, Layton Construction Company Rebecca Sanchez, Salt Lake County Mayor's Office Jennifer Seelig, 1-800-Contacts Jennifer G. Somers, Congressman Rob Bishop First District of Utah Alice Steiner, Utah Transit Authority Paul Torres, Manuel's Fine Foods Roger Tsai, Holland & Hart Steven E. Tyler, Holland & Hart Jon Warburton, After Hours Medical Company Winston Wilkinson, Salt Lake County Joe Zeidner, 1-800-Contacts
  31. 31. Small Business Statement of Principles n Lifeblood of the Utah economy – Approximately 700,000 Utahns are employed by approximately 68,000 small businesses. Helping entrepreneurs start and grow existing businesses is an important aspect of economic development. n Efficient government interaction – We support further streamlining of government interactions for small business and easing regulatory burdens that hinder economic expansion and job growth. 2014 Polic y Priorit ies n Support for key small business development programs – We support funding for programs in the small business sector with quantifiable and significant achievement including, Utah’s Business Resource Centers, Small Business Development Centers, and the Business Expansion and Retention Program. We also support the development of incubators and expansion of business development centers to spur job growth from our small business sector. n Benefit corporation designation – We support an optional state business registration option for public benefit corporations. Designation as a benefit corporation would allow entrepreneurs to pursue non-traditional business objectives. n Small business funding and development – We support efforts to enhance the ability of entrepreneurs to access capital and grow our economy. Specifically, we support allowing small businesses to refinance owner-occupied commercial real estate and innovative crowdfunding investment provisions. Recent Accomplishments n Women’s Business Center – In 2013, the Salt Lake Chamber Women’s Business Center (WBC) provided more than 540 hours of counseling to nearly 200 new small business clients, resulting in the creation of 24 new businesses. In total, the WBC provided training to nearly 4,300 people in 2013. n Small Business Department – The Chamber created a small business department to help create more efficiency in small business development efforts, grow resources available to small businesses across the state and help foster job growth. 79 % “As a statewide business organization representing more than 7,850 members, the Salt Lake Chamber advocates for businesses of all sizes and industries. While our major advocacy efforts in areas such as health reform, transportation and education benefit all Utah business, we are particularly mindful of the small business community and its unique needs.” Lori Chillingworth, Executive Vice President Small Business Banking, Zions Bank and Salt Lake Chamber Public Policy Chair Members with 100 employees or fewer S alt L ake C hamber 2 0 1 4 P ublic P olicy G uide 29
  32. 32. S a lt L a k e Ch a m b e r 2 0 1 3 – 2 0 1 4 E x e c u t i v e B OA R D Lane Beattie, Salt Lake Chamber Bruce Bingham, Hamilton Partners Jake Boyer, The Boyer Company Terry H. Buckner, The Buckner Company Lori Chillingworth, Zions Bank John Dahlstrom, Wasatch Properties Spencer P. Eccles, Governor's Office of Economic Development Kent Gibson, Capstone Property Management David R. Golden, Wells Fargo Gordy Haycock, Grant Thornton LLP Victor Ingalls, American Express Centurion Bank Clark D. Ivory, Ivory Homes Ron Jibson, Questar Corporation Fred Lampropoulos, Merit Medical Systems, Inc. Peggy Lander, Richter7 Eric Leavitt, Leavitt Group Brent Low, MediaOne of Utah Molly Mazzolini, Infinite Scale Keith McMullin, Deseret Management Corporation Scott W. Parson, Staker Parson Companies Ray Pickup, WCF Stephen Sands, Rio Tinto - Kennecott Utah Copper A. Richard Walje, Rocky Mountain Power Bert R. Zimmerli, Intermountain Healthcare S a lt L a k e Ch a m b e r 2 0 1 3 – 2 0 1 4 B o a rd o f G o v e r n o r s Don H. Adams, Bear River Mutual Insurance Company John A. Adams, Ray Quinney & Nebeker Abby Albrecht, Granite Construction Company Pres. Stan L. Albrecht, Utah State University Jeff Alexander, Alexander's Print Advantage Michael Allegra, Utah Transit Authority Christy Alter, Goldman, Sachs & Co. Larry Anderson, Redmond Minerals Lisa Arnett, Prescott Muir Architects Jim Balderson, Jones Lang LaSalle Jon Ballantyne, Petersen Incorporated D.J. Baxter, Redevelopment Agency of Salt Lake City Scott Beck, Visit Salt Lake, The Convention and Visitors Bureau Mayor Ralph Becker, City of Salt Lake Brian Bethers, 1-800-Contacts Mark H. Bouchard, CBRE President Robert Brems, Utah College of Applied Technology Mark Brennan, Ames Construction Bryce Buchanan, PricewaterhouseCoopers Lonnie M. Bullard, Jacobsen Construction Company Dan Buning, Accretive Health Keith M. Buswell, Wadman Corporation Sheila Camarella, KeyBank of Utah Dale Campbell, R&O Construction Company Andy Carroll, REAL Salt Lake / Rio Tinto Stadium Lee Carter, UBS Bank USA Sam W. Clark Jr. , Dale Barton Agency Wilford Clyde, Clyde Companies Jerry Cook, Interform Dean Cottle, Robert W. Baird & Co. Lew Cramer, Coldwell Banker Commericial Michael Dale, New Media Strategists Bob Dalley, Deseret Power Jennifer B. Danielson, Regence BlueCross BlueShield of Utah Ray Dardano, Marlin Business Bank Ingolf de Jong, GENCOMM Joy de Lisser, ATK Aerospace Structures Jim Divver, Zions Bank Alex Dunn, Vivint Rebecca Dutson, United Way of Salt Lake Jeff Edwards, Economic Development Corporation of Utah Gary England, Headwaters TJ England, CR England - Global Transportation Clint W. Ensign, Sinclair Companies David Entwistle, University of Utah Hospitals and Clinics KC Ericksen, Orbit Irrigation Products Raymond J. Etcheverry, Parsons Behle & Latimer Rick Folkerson, Ken Garff Automotive Group Rob S. Fox, Brahma Group Chris Gamvroulas, Ivory Homes Christian Gardner, Gardner Company Luke Garrott, Salt Lake City Council Leo Gonzalez, Bailac Lisa Gough, Sysco Intermountain Bill Haberstock, Keystone Aviation Jonathan Hafen, Parr Brown Gee & Loveless Neil Hafer, Enterprise Holdings, Inc. John Hanshaw, MountainStar - HCA Mountain Division Dan Harbeke, Union Pacific Railroad R. Kelly Harris, Harris Financial Utah Brent Hatch, ProFire Energy Pres. Matthew Holland, Utah Valley University Tim Homer, Wasatch Electric Gary Hoogeveen, Kern River Gas Transmission Company Tom N. Hori, REDCON Mark Howell, AmericanWest Bank Kirk Huffaker, Utah Heritage Foundation Scott Hymas, RC Willey Home Furnishings Eric Isom, CenturyLink Graden P. Jackson, Strong & Hanni Jonathan Johnson, Overstock.com Richard H. Johnson II, Stoel Rives Sean Jolley, Humana Sen. Patricia Jones, Dan Jones & Associates Stephen J. Hershey Kroes, Utah Foundation Bob Lake, Eide Bailly Charlie Lansche, Fidelity Investments Gary Larcenaire, Valley Mental Health Chris Lee, Deseret Management Corporation Pres. Brian Levin-Stankevich, Westminster College David Lockwood, EnergySolutions Daniel C. Lofgren, Cowboy Partners Steve Lundgren, Marriott Hotels Al Manbeian, GPS Capital Markets, Inc. Bill Manning, REAL Salt Lake / Rio Tinto Stadium Mayor Ben McAdams, Salt Lake County Rich McKeown, Leavitt Partners Kyle McSlarrow, Comcast Cable Communications Barbara Melendez, Kuck Immigration Partners Mike Moffitt, Gold Cross Services Richard R. Nelson, Utah Technology Council Sterling W. Nielsen, Mountain America Credit Union Corporate Brett Okland, Okland Construction Company Jim Olson, Utah Jazz Troy Olson, Les Olson Company Pres. David Pershing, University of Utah Ray Pickup, WCF Walter J. Plumb III, Plumb Holdings Gary B. Porter, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Dean Taylor Randall, David Eccles School of Business Chris Redgrave, Zions Bank Patricia Richards, SelectHealth Robin Rockwood, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco / Salt Lake City Branch Dr. Ronald Ruff, Mountain Medical Melissa Schick, PSAV Don Schulthies, Wal-Mart Stores Michael Seare, Kiewit Daniel Shapiro, eBay Eric Shaw, City of Salt Lake Randy Shumway, Cicero Group John Spigiel, Watson Laboratories Steven Stauffer, Grant Thornton LLP Joe Tomon, Proctor & Gamble Paul Torres, Manuel's Fine Foods Mark Tuffin, Smith's Food & Drug Stores Dr. Rachot Vacharothone, After Hours Medical Company Vicki Varela, Utah Office of Global Branding, Tourism and Film Jack Vines III, Verisk Health Kip Wadsworth, Ralph L. Wadsworth Construction Dean Jin Wang, Westminster College John W. Ward, Harmons Mike L. Washburn, Thanksgiving Point Glen Watkins, Jones Waldo Holbrook & McDonough Michael Weinholtz, CHG Healthcare Services Grant S. Whitaker, Utah Housing Corporation Nathan Wickizer, Cache Valley Electric Company Dr. Charles A. Wight, Weber State University Brent Williams, Dental Select JaeLynn Williams, 3M Health Information Systems Jody L. Williams, Holland & Hart Superintendent McKell Withers, Salt Lake City School District Andrea P. Wolcott, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco / Salt Lake City Branch Todd Wolfenbarger, Summit Group Edgar Wright, Pepsi Beverages Company Craig Zollinger, Chase The Salt Lake Chamber Board of Governors recognizes and appreciates the Chamber staff for its dedication and professionalism in serving Utah and growing Utah businesses and the economy. 175 E. University Blvd. (400 S.) Suite 600 I Salt Lake City, Utah 84111 I 801.364.3631 I slchamber.com

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