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How to Overdye Wool for Hooked Rugs

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Learn, step-by-step, how to change the color of wool for rug hooking, applique, penny rugs and other crafts. Overdyeing with commercial dyes, as well as altering the colors of wool without dyes and formulas is covered in this part of the series. Stay tuned for more in this series of Rug Hooking presentations by Sally Van Nuys of Folk 'n' Fiber. See http://www.folkandfiber.com for more!

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How to Overdye Wool for Hooked Rugs

  1. 1. 1<br />Presented by Sally Van Nuys at Folk ‘n’ Fiber Copyright © 2011, All rights reserved<br />Overdyeing Wool<br />A primer to preparing and overdyeing wool for rug hooking<br />Note: clouds will provide added explanations along<br />the way.<br />LINKSappear in text – click on them to get more information online.<br />
  2. 2. Wool comes in glorious colors, and some not so glorious colors! Don’t ever pass up a good piece of wool just because you don’t like the color.<br />Presented by Sally Van Nuys at Folk ‘n’ Fiber Copyright © 2011, All rights reserved<br />2<br /> Glorious Wool Colors<br /><ul><li>There are ways to change those ugly or not-quite-right woolens to make them ‘just right’ for your rug hooking projects.</li></li></ul><li> Prep the Wool<br />After collecting wool to recycle, preparation is key!<br /><ul><li> Do not bring wool into your home until you are ready to wash or overdye it – there’s always the danger of critters that could get into your other wools!
  3. 3. Remove zippers, belts, buttons and other decoration.
  4. 4. Take down or cut off hems, cut off waistbands, and remove linings before washing.</li></ul>I always wash reclaimed wool that I am going to overdye, others don’t; washing and drying wool before overdyeing are up to you.<br />Presented by Sally Van Nuys at Folk ‘n’ Fiber Copyright © 2011, All rights reserved<br />3<br />
  5. 5. Why wash wool?<br />Washing does the necessary ‘fulling’ of wool. But if you are working with recycled wool garments, it also washes out body oils, soil, dry cleaning fluid residues, or dirt that can attract moths and their wool-eating larvae into your wool stash.<br />Wash in washing machine with normal agitation on hot/warm setting and use wool-safe detergent (no fabric softener and never any bleach!)<br />If wool is already fairly thick, use a warm/cold washer setting.<br />Presented by Sally Van Nuys at Folk ‘n’ Fiber Copyright © 2011, All rights reserved<br />4<br /> Wash the Wool<br />a small amount of shrinkage is desirable for rug hooking; it helps lock individual fibers to each other and makes wool<br />less likely to fray during hooking <br />
  6. 6. Dry the Wool<br />After washing, remove the wool from the washer immediately and put in the dryer with:<br /><ul><li>a thick bath-sized terry towel – to fluff it up
  7. 7. a fabric softener sheet – to make it soft</li></ul>If wool has thickened considerably during washing, use a low dryer setting just to fluff it for a few minutes, and then hang it up to dry completely; otherwise, use normal dryer setting until the wool is completely dry.<br />Remove dried wool promptly and neatly fold or roll for storage.<br /><ul><li>Store wool where is will not be affected by accumulated moisture (plastic bags and plastic tubs are not the best choice.) Open shelves or a cupboard or dresser where the temperature is stable is best.</li></ul>Presented by Sally Van Nuys at Folk ‘n’ Fiber Copyright © 2011, All rights reserved<br />5<br />
  8. 8. Why overdye?<br />You have wool in your stash but not the right colors for your project.<br />You have lots of the right color, but of varying shades that do not mix well.<br />It’s just plain fun!<br />Presented by Sally Van Nuys at Folk ‘n’ Fiber Copyright © 2011, All rights reserved<br />6<br /> Why Dye Wool?<br />Note: if you don’t want to use commercial dyes and dye formulas, skip to Slide 14 for a different way to change the colors of wool.<br />
  9. 9. Gather the Supplies<br />Kitchen Sink and Stove<br />Dye Pot: enamel (without any chips inside) or stainless steel<br />Acid-Reactive Dyes for Wool<br />Overdye Formulas – many books are available<br />Wool<br />Blank Dye Journal for keeping notes<br />Synthrapolor another wetting agent, such as Jet Dry for dishwashers<br />Measuring Spoons: from 1/64 to 1 teaspoon<br />Clean, Glass Jars<br />Glass Measuring Cup<br />Tongs for Lifting Wet Wool<br />Plastic Fork or Small Whisk<br />Heavy, Heat-resistant Rubber Gloves<br />Uniodized Table Salt (optional)<br />White Household Vinegar<br />Protective Covering for Yourself & Your Work Surfaces<br />Presented by Sally Van Nuys at Folk ‘n’ Fiber Copyright © 2011, All rights reserved<br />7<br />
  10. 10. 8<br /> Choose a Dye Color<br /><ul><li>Select a color formula from a dye book
  11. 11. Have an idea of how that color will change the wool you want to overdye
  12. 12. Use a color wheel</li></ul>A formula is a recipe stating how much of each dye color to use to achieve the color<br />Presented by Sally Van Nuys at Folk ‘n’ Fiber Copyright © 2011, All rights reserved<br />
  13. 13. 9<br /> Choose & Soak the Wool<br /><ul><li>Use from 1/2 to 1 yard of wool,</li></ul> depending upon size of dye pot<br /><ul><li>Select several wools
  14. 14. Fill sink or tub with hot water, add Synthropol according to package directions, or use about 3 tablespoons of Jet Dry</li></ul>Synthropol is a surfactant made by ProChemical.<br /><ul><li>Add the wool to the pot, squeezing water through each piece to thoroughly wet it
  15. 15. Soak wool for 15 to 30 minutes (longer is better)</li></ul>Presented by Sally Van Nuys at Folk ‘n’ Fiber Copyright © 2011, All rights reserved<br />
  16. 16. 10<br /> Prepare the Dye Pot<br /><ul><li>Select a dye pot and fill it about 2/3 full of warm tap water.
  17. 17. Add a tablespoon of uniodized salt, which helps the dye absorb evenly. If you want a mottled effect to your wool, omit the salt.</li></ul>table salt is iodized – look for ‘uniodized’ on the label<br /><ul><li>Put the pot on the stove & allow it to come to temperature; bring the water just to the simmer point, then turn the flame down to maintain a simmer before you add the dye and wool to the pot.</li></ul>Presented by Sally Van Nuys at Folk ‘n’ Fiber Copyright © 2011, All rights reserved<br />
  18. 18. 11<br /> Prepare the Dye<br /><ul><li>Wear rubber gloves, and prepare the dye according to manufacturer's directions.
  19. 19. For most formulas, you'll add measured dyes to one cup of boiling water (1 CBW.) To prevent dyes from intermixing, stir measuring spoon in dry salt between colors.
  20. 20. Use a small whisk or plastic fork to thoroughly mix the dye in the water until it is completelydissolved.
  21. 21. When the dye bath is at a simmer, add the dye mixture to the pot and stir gently.</li></ul>Presented by Sally Van Nuys at Folk ‘n’ Fiber Copyright © 2011, All rights reserved<br />
  22. 22. 12<br /> Dye the Wool<br /><ul><li>Add pre-soaked wool to the dye bath. Push the wool to the bottom of the pot; don’t allow wool to poke above the water line.
  23. 23. For mottled color, only stir the wool when it first goes into the pot. For more even color, stir when you add the wool, and several times during the dye process. Cover the pot and let it simmer about 30 minutes.
  24. 24. Check wool for color intensity. When color is right, add 1/3 cup of white vinegar and stir.
  25. 25. Cover the pot and allow the vinegar to set dye into wool.</li></ul>Presented by Sally Van Nuys at Folk ‘n’ Fiber Copyright © 2011, All rights reserved<br />
  26. 26. Cool, Rinse & Dry the Wool<br />Presented by Sally Van Nuys at Folk ‘n’ Fiber Copyright © 2011, All rights reserved<br />13<br /><ul><li>Carefully move dye pot from stove to sink. Wear protective gloves to prevent being burned.
  27. 27. Slowly cool the wool by running first warm, then tepid, then cool water into the pot. You can also just turn off the fire under the pot and allow the wool to cool in the dye pot overnight.
  28. 28. Remove each piece of cooled wool from dye pot and lightly wring out excess water.
  29. 29. Use a cold rinse cycle in your washing machine to just rinse & spin the wool.
  30. 30. Put the wool into your dryer with a bath towel and a fabric softener sheet until dry, then remove and fold the wool.</li></li></ul><li>14<br />Presented by Sally Van Nuys at Folk ‘n’ Fiber Copyright © 2011, All rights reserved<br />Changing Wool Colors<br />How to change the colors of wool without overdyeing!<br />Let’s talk about . . .<br /><ul><li> Marrying (Stewing) go to Slide 15
  31. 31. Marbling go to Slide 18</li></li></ul><li>Presented by Sally Van Nuys at Folk ‘n’ Fiber Copyright © 2011, All rights reserved<br />15<br /> Marrying Wool<br />Marrying wool means to combine the colors that are released by several shades of wool, and then add that married color back into all the wool to bring them closer in shade and intensity.<br />Marrying allows you to use more of your wool together in the same project – especially if you have recycled wool with colors that just do not work together.<br />This method is also called Stewing when you use several wools of different colors, like red and green, instead of wool of similar colors, like several reds.<br />
  32. 32. How To Do It<br /><ul><li>To a large pot of water, add 3 Tblsp of powdered Tide or Washing Soda and stir to dissolve. Place pot on the stovetop and allow the water to come to a simmer.
  33. 33. Place pieces of wool into the pot and push wool down until it is soaked through. Cover the pot and leave it to simmer for 15-30 minutes.
  34. 34. When you see a nice amount of color in the water, add about 1/3 of a cup of white vinegar to the pot and stir thoroughly. Cover the pot again and allow the vinegar to set the married color back for 15-30 more minutes or until the water in the pot is clear again.</li></ul>Presented by Sally Van Nuys at Folk ‘n’ Fiber Copyright © 2011, All rights reserved<br />16<br />
  35. 35. Rinse & Dry the Wool<br /><ul><li>Carefully move dye pot from stove to sink. Wear protective gloves to prevent being burned.
  36. 36. Slowly cool the wool by running first warm, then tepid, then cool water into the pot. You can also just turn off the fire under the pot and allow the wool to cool in the dye pot overnight.
  37. 37. Remove each piece of cooled wool from dye pot and lightly wring out excess water.
  38. 38. Use a cold rinse cycle in your washing machine to just rinse & spin the wool.
  39. 39. Put the wool into your dryer with a bath towel and a fabric softener sheet until dry, then remove and fold the wool.</li></ul>Presented by Sally Van Nuys at Folk ‘n’ Fiber Copyright © 2011, All rights reserved<br />17<br />

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