The Lost City of Z: A Tale of Deadly  Obsession in the Amazon (Vintage     Departures) by David Grann                   Be...
His expeditionary force consisted of three men--himself, his 21-year-oldson Jack, and one of Jack’s friends. Fawcett belie...
Curious, I plugged Fawcett’s name into a newspaper database and wasamazed by the headlines that appeared, including “THREE...
I do not usually choose this genre to read, but something pulled me to it,and I am glad I followed that pull. I found this...
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The lost city of z a tale of deadly obsession in the amazon vintage departures by david grann cant wait until its a movie

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The lost city of z a tale of deadly obsession in the amazon vintage departures by david grann cant wait until its a movie

  1. 1. The Lost City of Z: A Tale of Deadly Obsession in the Amazon (Vintage Departures) by David Grann Best Non-Fiction Read Since Shadow DiversAmazon Exclusive: John Grisham Reviews The Lost City of Z Since firstpublishing A Time to Kill in 1988, John Grisham has written twenty novelsand one work of nonfiction, The Innocent Man. His second novel, TheFirm, spent 47 weeks on the New York Times bestseller list, becomingthe bestselling novel of 1991. The success of The Pelican Brief, which hitnumber one on the New York Times bestseller list, and The Client,which debuted at number one, confirmed Grishams reputation as themaster of the legal thriller. His most recent novel, The Associate, waspublished in January 2009. Read his exclusive Amazon guest review ofThe Lost City of Z: In April of 1925, a legendary British explorer named Percy Fawcettlaunched his final expedition into the depths of the Amazon in Brazil. Hisdestination was the lost city of El Dorado, the “City of Gold,” an ancientkingdom of great sophistication, architecture, and culture that, for somereason, had vanished. The idea of El Dorado had captivatedanthropologists, adventurers, and scientists for 400 years, though therewas no evidence it ever existed. Hundreds of expeditions had gonelooking for it. Thousands of men had perished in the jungles searchingfor it. Fawcett himself had barely survived several previous expeditionsand was more determined than ever to find the lost city with its streets andtemples of gold. The world was watching. Fawcett, the last of the great Victorianadventurers, was financed by the Royal Geographical Society in London,the world’s foremost repository of research gathered by explorers.Fawcett, then age 57, had proclaimed for decades his belief in the City ofZ, as he had nicknamed it. His writings, speeches, and exploits hadcaptured the imagination of millions, and reports of his last expeditionwere front page news.
  2. 2. His expeditionary force consisted of three men--himself, his 21-year-oldson Jack, and one of Jack’s friends. Fawcett believed that only a smallgroup had any chance of surviving the horrors of the Amazon. He hadseen large forces decimated by malaria, insects, snakes, poison darts,starvation, and insanity. He knew better. He and his two companionswould travel light, carry their own supplies, eat off the land, pose no threatto the natives, and endure months of hardship in their search for the LostCity of Z. They were never seen again. Fawcett’s daily dispatches trickled to astop. Months passed with no word. Because he had survived severalsimilar forays into the Amazon, his family and friends considered him tobe near super-human. As before, they expected Fawcett to stumble out ofthe jungle, bearded and emaciated and announcing some fantasticdiscovery. It did not happen. Over the years, the search for Fawcett became more alluring than thesearch for El Dorado itself. Rescue efforts, from the serious to thefarcical, materialized in the years that followed, and hundreds of otherslost their lives in the search. Rewards were posted. Psychics werebrought in by the family. Articles and books were written. For decadesthe legend of Percy Fawcett refused to die. The great mystery of what happened to Fawcett has never been solved,perhaps until now. In 2004, author David Grann discovered the storywhile researching another one. Soon, like hundreds before him, hebecame obsessed with the legend of the colorful adventurer and hisbaffling disappearance. Grann, a lifelong New Yorker with an admittedaversion to camping and mountain climbing, a lousy sense of direction,and an affinity for take-out food and air conditioning, soon found himself inthe jungles of the Amazon. What he found there, some 80 years afterFawcett’s disappearance, is a startling conclusion to this absorbingnarrative. The Lost City of Z is a riveting, exciting and thoroughly compelling tale ofadventure. (Photo © Maki Galimberti) A Q&A with Author David Grann Question: When did you first stumble upon the story of Percy Fawcett andhis search for an ancient civilization in the Amazon—and when did yourealize this particular story had you in “the grip”? David Grann: While I was researching a story on the mysterious death ofthe world’s greatest Sherlock Holmes expert, I came upon a reference toFawcett’s role in inspiring Arthur Conan Doyle’s novel The Lost World.
  3. 3. Curious, I plugged Fawcett’s name into a newspaper database and wasamazed by the headlines that appeared, including “THREE MEN FACECANNIBALS IN RELIC QUEST” and tribesmen “Seize Movie ActorSeeking to Rescue Fawcett.” As I read each story, I became more andmore curious--about how Fawcett’s quest for a lost city and hisdisappearance had captivated the world; how for decades hundreds ofscientists and explorers had tried to find evidence of Fawcett’s missingparty and the City of Z; and how countless seekers had disappeared ordied from starvation, diseases, attacks by wild animals, or poisonousarrows. What intrigued me most, though, was the notion of Z. For yearsmost scientists had considered the brutal conditions in the largest junglein the world inimical to humankind, but more recently some archeologistshad begun to question this longstanding view and believed that asophisticated civilization like Z might have existed. Such a discoverywould challenge virtually everything that was believed about the nature ofthe Amazon and what the Americas looked liked before the arrival ofChristopher Columbus. Suddenly, the story had every tantalizingelement--mystery, obsession, death, madness--as well as great intellectualstakes. Still, I probably didn’t realize I was fully in the story’s “grip” until Itold my wife that I planned to take out an extra life insurance policy andfollow Fawcett’s trail into the Amazon. Q: Tell us about the discovery of Fawcett’s previously unpublished diariesand logbooks. DG: Researching the book often felt like a kind of treasure hunt andnothing was more exciting than coming across these materials in an oldchest in the house of one of Fawcett’s grandchildren. Fawcett, who hadbeen a British spy, was extremely secretive about his search for Z--in partbecause he didn’t want his rivals to discover the lost city before he didand in part because he feared that too many people would die if they triedto follow in his wake. These old, crumbling diaries and logbooks heldincredible clues to both Fawcett’s life and death; what’s more, theyrevealed a key to his clandestine route to the Lost City of Z. Q: In an attempt to retrace Fawcett’s journey, many scientists andexplorers have faced madness, kidnapping, and death. Did you everhesitate to go to the Amazon? DG: I probably should have been more hesitant, especially after readingsome of the diaries of members of other parties that had scoured theAmazon for a lost city. One seeker of El Dorado described reaching astate of “privation so great that we were eating nothing but leather, beltsand soles of shoes, cooked with certain herbs, with the result that sogreat was our weakness that we could not remain standing.” In thatexpedition alone, some four thousand men perished. Other explorersresorted to caFeatures:
  4. 4. I do not usually choose this genre to read, but something pulled me to it,and I am glad I followed that pull. I found this book to be an exciting pageturner, and often felt the urge to become a "Fawcett fanatic" myself whilereading it. Thank goodness Mr. Grann decided to do it for me with thisriveting adventure book which I could enjoy the from the safety of my ownhome. I do not understand the reviewers that felt this was a boringadventure book, because I could barely put it down. I cannot wait until it ismade into a movie, because it has all the elements for a great adventuremovie. It is a shame that prior to this book, in recent history at least,Colonel Fawcett was all but forgotten. This story deserved to be told againand Colonel Fawcett deserves to be remembered for his heroic andultimately fatal quest. I felt Mr. Grann did a good job bringing this story andhero to life again, and was very brave, despite his admitted lack of outdooradventurer skills, to pursue his research of the subject into the Amazonjungle. For More 5 Star Customer Reviews and Lowest Price:The Lost City of Z: A Tale of Deadly Obsession in the Amazon (Vintage Departures) by David Grann - 5 Star Customer Reviews and Lowest Price!

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