Ch 1 Linguistic Anthropology

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  • -Fear of loosing one’s frame of reference leads to ethnocentrism, but you don’t need to lose your frame of reference instead to accept alternatives -Commonalities- seeking diversity is one aspect but we also compare and analyze difference to discover possible similarities- “human universals”
  • -Boas- 1858-1942, fist professor of anthro in the U.S. (German) Belief in great chain of being in Europe. Language was “one of the most important manifestation of mental life” -Boas- 1858-1942, fist professor of anthro in the U.S. (German) Belief in great chain of being in Europe. Language was “one of the most important manifestation of mental life”
  • Unlike anthro which is holistic, comparative & fieldwork based- theoretical linguistics is focused, specific and intuitive. Goal- to describe the underlying structure of a language (what makes up a language specifically, like the skeleton) Specific- seeks language universals, such as generalizations that apply to all languages. O= objects follows V=verbs Intuitive- data gathering method is introspection (analysis of one’s own culture or the informants) BUT- To see the cat tree-in, or in Spanish “big house” would be house big (adjective follows object/subject) Ignores the social contexts in which language is used and regional differences. “New Yawk” Theoretical L. may fall into a erroneous generalizations
  • Ch 1 Linguistic Anthropology

    1. 1. The Anthropology of Language: An Introduction to Linguistic Anthropology <ul><li>Dr. Harriet J. Ottenheimer </li></ul>Chapter 1 Linguistic Anthropology
    2. 2. Which of the following is NOT True about anthropology? <ul><li>It is holistic </li></ul><ul><li>It is ethnocentric </li></ul><ul><li>It is based on fieldwork </li></ul><ul><li>It is comparative </li></ul><ul><li>All are correct </li></ul>
    3. 3. Theoretical Linguistics examines the contexts & situations in which language is used. <ul><li>True </li></ul><ul><li>False </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t know </li></ul>
    4. 4. Introducing Linguistic Anthropology <ul><li>Linguistic Anthropology </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Contexts & situations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cause of different world views </li></ul></ul>
    5. 5. Anthropology is Holistic <ul><li>Four Fields: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Archaeology </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Physical Anthropology </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cultural Anthropology </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Linguistic Anthropology </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Applied Anthropology </li></ul><ul><ul><li>A fifth field or a second dimension?. </li></ul></ul>
    6. 6. Anthropology is Comparative <ul><li>Cultural relativity </li></ul><ul><li>Ethnocentrism </li></ul><ul><ul><li>frames of reference </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Commonalities. </li></ul>
    7. 7. Anthropology is Fieldwork-based <ul><li>In the field ethnography </li></ul><ul><li>Participant Observation </li></ul><ul><li>New frames of reference </li></ul><ul><li>Learning ‘inside’ view . </li></ul>Chiapas, Mexico- 2003
    8. 8. Boas and Fieldwork <ul><li>Language vs culture vs race </li></ul><ul><li>Language as window into culture </li></ul><ul><li>Language as necessary for fieldwork. </li></ul>Franz Boas, 1900, posing for model of Kwakiutl dancer
    9. 9. Theoretical Linguistics is: <ul><li>Focused </li></ul><ul><ul><li>On underlying structures and rules </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Specific </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Deducing universal rules from specific languages </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Rule from English: if O follows V , then use Prep </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>To see the cat in the tree </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>BUT </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Huona mpaha mwiri- juu - To see the cat tree-in </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Intuitive </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Using your own language as a source of data. </li></ul></ul>
    10. 10. Some Fieldwork Concerns <ul><li>Culture shock </li></ul><ul><li>Ethnography as a “text” </li></ul><ul><li>Ethics </li></ul><ul><li>Mitchell </li></ul><ul><ul><li>(pp.1-9 in W/R) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Answer 1.1, 1.2, & 1.4 </li></ul></ul>Tzotzil Woman- Chamula Market, Chiapas 2003
    11. 11. Next: <ul><li>Language and Culture </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Read: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Textbook Chapter 2 </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Workbook/Reader: </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Conklin (pp. 15-19) </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Ethnosemantics (pp. 21-22) </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Web Exercise 2.1 (p.22) </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Prepare to do: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Language Creating (W/R p. 25) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Conversation partnering 2.1 (W/R p.25) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>OR </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Conversation partnering 2.2 (W/R pp. 25-26) </li></ul></ul></ul>

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