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Samar Garg lost his peace after his         beloved passed away.Navya Sharma abandoned her peace in the           hands of...
THE PROLOGUEI believe that the city of Rishikesh holds more adventure than it is given creditfor. It was in late 2011, whe...
They are happy with the filtered foot fall which ensures that only genuinepeople show up. And they want to keep it that wa...
“Yes, you have. And then there is the second type. These are the people whoconsider themselves broken. They can see questi...
I listened to every word coming from Swamiji with rapt attention. Swamiji hadobviously given a lot of thought to this. I w...
“Swamiji, my concern is that even though I would love to write about what Ihave learnt, the people of today don’t want to ...
Sachin Garg is one of the highest          selling authors in India.    His books regularly feature on       most Indian b...
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Come on inner peace sachin garg

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Come on inner peace sachin garg

  1. 1. Samar Garg lost his peace after his beloved passed away.Navya Sharma abandoned her peace in the hands of drugs. Vandana doesnt want to let go off herpeace, but destiny has other plans for her. We are all looking for peace of mind. So are they. An adventure which began at The Ashram,in Rishikesh, becomes one of the most soul crunching journeys ever!Will they find out what they are looking for? Will they find Inner Peace?Will in the process of reading this book, you find out a thing or two about yourself? Read to find out!
  2. 2. THE PROLOGUEI believe that the city of Rishikesh holds more adventure than it is given creditfor. It was in late 2011, when I had finally quit my job to become a full timeauthor and entrepreneur that my love for Rishikesh truly grew. With more controlover my time after quitting the job, I realized it was becoming increasinglydifficult to not take the bus to Rishikesh at every chance that I got. Yes, I fell inlove with the city.I bumped into freakish backpackers, made random friends and heard someunusual stories in the time that I spent there. But more than anything, I realizedthat if ever there was a place tailor made for self-discovery, it would have to beRishikesh.The credit for the genesis of this book would have to go to someone to whom Iwould refer throughout as Swamiji. He has a real name and he has his ownAshram. But unlike many fame hungry Swamis and Ashram owners around,Swamiji insisted on maintaining a low profile. I understood his distaste forpopularity, simply because popularity attracts the wrong kind of people andwrong kind of headaches for him.
  3. 3. They are happy with the filtered foot fall which ensures that only genuinepeople show up. And they want to keep it that way.As a result, I have changed names or have just alluded to them by theirAshram designations. I am not going to name the Ashram too. I have sharedSwamiji’s story in the book and people close to him might be able torecognize him; but that is done after his permission.The idea of this book came to me on a lazy monsoon evening, as I sat inSwamiji’s kutiya, in the middle of a philosophical conversation with him. Wewere discussing the kind of people who came to The Ashram. What Swamijimeant to them and what his mission in life was.“But what brings people to The Ashram Swamiji? When I lived in the city, Ibelieved nobody had any time for spirituality. I come here and witness that it’salmost fashionable to be broken. Young folks seem to be coming here simplybecause it’s such a cool story they can take back to their friends”Swamiji always weighed his words before speaking, which was probably whyevery word coming from his mouth was a gem.“There are two types of people in this world, Sachin. The first, who comprisethe majority, are simple people who lead simple lives. They may or may notachieve great things through their simple ways. They wake up every morning,go about their daily chores and labour and do pretty well for themselves. Ifsomebody were to ask them questions like why are they here, on PlanetEarth, they would frown and rush to work.”“I know! And I have lived amongst such people all my life,” I said.
  4. 4. “Yes, you have. And then there is the second type. These are the people whoconsider themselves broken. They can see questions which the first type isblind to. They can have thoughts which they would want to disentanglethemselves from, but they can’t.”“I can’t agree more, Swamiji. But isn’t it sad that this second category pushesitself into sadness and state of brokenness?” I pondered.“The reason why they consider themselves broken could be any of thefollowing:1 – They have had an event or a tragedy which has had a lasting impressionon them. No matter how hard they try, they cannot get it out of their heads andhave stopped seeing a point in all things in life. For a short while, they manageto convince themselves that they are over it and world is alright. But it’sdefinitely not. Time coats sad memories with dust but it is bound to fly off if wedon’t find a permanent solution to heal ourselves.2 – They have been disowned or cheated by someone they loved. They werenormal, happy people like the rest of us. But then, one act of failure or distrustor deception has left them so devastated that all else seems juvenile andempty.3 – Forces of Life, or, if you wish to call it God, has dealt a terrible hand tothem and all they can do now is wait for everything to end. Someone oncesaid that dream as if you were to live forever. But what if you know you weregoing to die soon? How will you sleep peacefully at night? Will you becomepermanently depressed or excessively cheerful for the remaining time youhave?”
  5. 5. I listened to every word coming from Swamiji with rapt attention. Swamiji hadobviously given a lot of thought to this. I was lucky to have known a man aswise as him.“And you have taken up the mission of changing some of these lives?” Iasked.“I am too small an entity to make any significant change, Sachin. But I try tohelp whoever comes to me”“Is there any way in which I can help?” I asked him, even though I knew I wasincapable of it.“You sure can. But it would require a lot of effort and commitment from you,”Swamiji said.“I would love to try it”“You are an author, Sachin. Your books reach out to the youth of the country.Even though you don’t realize it, you are leaving an impression on a lot ofminds. I want your next book to be based on what you have learnt staying inthis Ashram. I want you to tell our story, without telling our names. I want youto help us reach out to people we have always wanted to reach.”“I will be honoured to attempt something as meaningful as that,” I said, albeitwith a withheld fear and hesitation.“You don’t seem absolutely convinced”
  6. 6. “Swamiji, my concern is that even though I would love to write about what Ihave learnt, the people of today don’t want to read about such things. I believein what I have learnt and that has changed my life. But people are too busywatching movies and tv serials and killing time in ways they won’t even realize.They wouldn’t care about what is happening in an obscure Ashram inRishikesh.”Swamiji heard me out. And then he grew silent for a few seconds. And then hespoke, as if an idea had hit him.“Rishi Vyas wrote The Mahabharata. Gita, which is a part of The Mahabharatais considered the biggest learning of Hindu religion. But why is it to relevant? Itis because when you read The Mahabharata, you know the story and thepeople who are talking about The Gita. You know Krishna, the person who isdelivering it. You know Arjuna, the person who is receiving it. You knowArjuna’s dilemma’s which are being addressed in The Gita. You know themethodology Krishna has adopted to solve them. You understand The Gita sowell because it’s a part of a story.”I had a confused look on my face. I had somehow lost track of what he wassaying.“The point is, Sachin, that I want you to write a story, like you do in your books,and deliver my message through it. As Gita forms a part of the Mahabharata, Iwant you to weave a stimulating story, and incorporate my lessons for people.That’s the only way we can reach out to them.”And once again, I knew I was sitting in front of a genius.
  7. 7. Sachin Garg is one of the highest  selling authors in India.  His books regularly feature on  most Indian bestseller lists. CATCH SACHIN: www.sachingarg.me facebook.com/sachingarg.me me.sachingarg@gmail.com twitter.com/gargsachin

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