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Fundamental training on Fire Detection & Alarm System

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Fundamental training on Fire Detection & Alarm System

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This is a basic training on Fire Detection and Alarm System, created to give my colleagues from non-engineering divisions a comprehensive brief on the system. This is most suitable for individuals with little or no technical knowledge. This training introduces the devices and the system in a whole, not how to design it.

This is a basic training on Fire Detection and Alarm System, created to give my colleagues from non-engineering divisions a comprehensive brief on the system. This is most suitable for individuals with little or no technical knowledge. This training introduces the devices and the system in a whole, not how to design it.

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Fundamental training on Fire Detection & Alarm System

  1. 1. Introduction to FIRE DETECTION & ALARM SYSTEM Presented by Engr. Sabrul Jamil, PRINCE2 Manager, Fire Safety, Ezzy Automations Ltd, Bangladesh Phone: +88 01617181910 eMail: jamil@sabrul.com Website: www.sabrul.com
  2. 2. Objectives NOT TO  Basic Knowledge of FDA  Inform Customer the System  Understand DRAWING & BOM  Prepare Design or Drawing  Prepare BOQ (form Drawing) 2
  3. 3. Introduction to FIRE
  4. 4. The Purpose of Fire Safety Engineering & Detection System DETECT FIRE ALERT OCCUPANTS EVACUATE THE PREMISES ALERT THE LOCAL FIRE DEPARTMENT Safety of life Conservation of property Continuity of operations Protection of the environment 4
  5. 5. Elements of Fire Fire Triangle Three elements a fire needs to ignite: 1. HEAT, 2. FUEL, 3. OXYGEN Can be prevented or extinguished by removing any one of the elements in the fire triangle 5
  6. 6. Elements of Fire Fire Diamond Once a fire has started, the resulting exothermic chain reaction sustains the fire and allows it to continue until or unless at least one of the elements of the fire is blocked. 6
  7. 7. Classes of fire  Class A - fires involving solid materials such as wood, paper or textiles.  Class B - fires involving flammable liquids such as petrol, diesel or oils.  Class C - fires involving gases.  Class D - fires involving metals.  Class E - fires involving live electrical apparatus. (Technically ‘Class E’ doesn’t exists however this is used for convenience here)  Class F - fires involving cooking oils such as in deep-fat fryers. 7
  8. 8. Start to produce PoCs Produces visible smoke particles Produces a high temperature Graph of a Fire ConditionIncipient Smoldering Flame HighHeat Time-> Fire Detection Activation Sprinkler/Hydrant activation 8
  9. 9. The Stages of a Fire 1) Incipient • Products of Combustion particles are produced (<0.3 microns). • No visible smoke or detectable heat. • May occur for milliseconds or days. 9
  10. 10.  Visible smoke particles are produced (>0.3 microns).  Little visible flame or noticeable heat. The Stages of a Fire 2) Smoldering: 10
  11. 11. • Rapid combustion produces radiant energy in the visible, and invisible (IR, UV) spectrums. • Heat begins to buildup at this stage The Stages of a Fire 3) Flame: 11
  12. 12. Terminology  FACP - Fire Alarm Control Panel.  FACU - Fire Alarm Control Unit.  FCC - Federal Communications Commission  UL - Underwriters Laboratories  NFPA - National Fire Protection Agency.  AHJ, LAHJ - Authority Having Jurisdiction, Local AHJ  ADAAG - Americans with Disabilities Act Accessibility Guidelines.  PoC - Products of Combustion  LED - Light Emitting Diode  IDC - Initiating Device Circuit  NAC - Notification Appliance Circuit  ELR, EOL - End of Line Resistor 12
  13. 13. Terminology  NEC - National Electrical Code (NFPA 70)  NEMA - National Electrical Manufacturing Association  EIA - Electronics Industry Association  Cd - Candela  dB, dBA - Decibels  FWR - Full Wave Rectified  ANSI - American National Standards Institute  PIV - Post Indicator Valve  OS&Y - Outside Stem and Yoke Valves  SFPE - Society for Fire Protection Engineers  Shall - Indicates a mandatory requirement  Should - Indicates a recommendation or advisement 13
  14. 14. Guidelines  NFPA 70 - National Electrical Code  NFPA 72 - National Fire Alarm Code  NFPA 101 - Life Safety Code  National Electrical Code Handbook, NFPA  Life Safety Code Handbook, NFPA  Fire Protection Handbook, NFPA  Fire Alarm Signaling Systems, NFPA 14
  15. 15.  A global safety consulting and certification company  UL is one of several companies approved to perform safety testing by the U.S. federal agency Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). What is “UL Listed”? 15
  16. 16. What is “FM Approved”?  independent testing arm of international insurance carrier, FM Global.  FM approvals uses scientific research and testing to make sure products conform to the highest standards for safety and property loss prevention.  Products that pass get the “FM APPROVED” mark. Think of it as like the Good Housekeeping seal of approval, only better. 16
  17. 17. Overview of Fire Detection and Alarm System
  18. 18. The Origin of Fire Alarm  Long ago, as an early method of spreading the word of fire danger, people shouted "Fire!"  The Town Bell Or Other Noisemaker Was Also Used.  Electricity was discovered and electrical (and electronic) fire alarm systems were developed. 18
  19. 19. How a Fire Alarm Works  Basically, to activate it, a fire alarm system uses manually operated devices (pull stations), or automatically activated devices (smoke and heat detectors, waterflow switches, etc.).  Once a fire is discovered by the fire alarm system, it tells the occupants of a building about the fire (by making lots of noise and flashing lights), and calls the fire-fighters (through automatic communication).  After that, it is up to the occupants to defend themselves from the fire, and the firefighters to try to extinguish it. 19
  20. 20. Main Components of a Fire Alarm System Detection Control Notification Input Process Output 20
  21. 21. Typical Main Components Initiating Devices Control Panel (FACP) Notification Appliances Smoke Detector Heat Waterflow Switch Ceiling Mounted Horn Strobe Wall Mounted Horn Strobe Manual Station Detection Control Notification Heat Detector 21
  22. 22. Ancillary Devices Control Panel Heat Door Holder/Releases Remote Annunciator Printer Control Relays 22
  23. 23. Key Expectations from a World Class Fire Alarm & Detection System Rejection of Nuisance Alarm Stable System Protection Of Investment Code Compliance FlexibilityReliability Serviceability Reliable Detection Modularity & Scalability Easy Maintenance Reliable Notification Challenging Application Easy Operation Low Downtime Integrated Solution After Sales Support Innovative Technology Fast project Closure Easy Commissioning Smooth AMC Easy operation OEM Support Highly Flexible Low Cost Of Ownership 23
  24. 24. Fire Alarm Circuits are SUPERVISED 02:38:00 P001 D000 001 Trbl Active Basement NAC TROUBLE LED = Light Emitting Diode Message • Circuit is on continuously • Circuit is monitored • If the circuit moves out of specification, a trouble event occurs • A trouble event usually ‐ turns on an LED ‐ turns on a signal ‐ causes a message Signal 24
  25. 25. Initiating devices
  26. 26. Conventional vs Addressable 26
  27. 27. PROGRAMMING METHOD DIP SWITCHES ROTARY SWITCHES HANDHELD PROGRAMMER 27
  28. 28. Defining ‘Intelligence’ • Device returns sensor values for panel processing. • Device maintains environmental data base for one or more sensors and makes alarm decision. • Devices can give additional information such as % dirty. 28
  29. 29. Addressable Fire Alarm Circuit 10 01 02 03 04 05 06 Each device has a unique identifier, or address, so that it is unique to the system. 07 08 09 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 29
  30. 30. Smoke Detector Manual Pull Station A fire alarm system can have a variety of input devices. Inputs Elements of Fire Alarm 30
  31. 31. SLC-Signaling Line Circuit Out Return Class ‘A’ SLC Circuit With Detectors & Modules CONTROL PANEL • Usually have a Class ‘A’or ‘B’ connection option • Input and output devices can be on the same circuit • Control panel device communication is sometimes called a protocol T-Tap option on class B 31
  32. 32. INITIATING DEVICES • Manual initiating devices – break glass station, buttons, pull stations and the like are all considered manual initiating devices. They should be located near the exits of your building and should be easily accessible, identified and operated. • Automatic initiating devices –wide variety of automatic initiating devices, including heat detectors, smoke detectors, flame detectors, CO detectors, water flow detectors, etc. • Sense changes in the environment and react automatically • May use cameras and computer algorithms to analyze visible effects of fire and movement in ways that other detection devices can’t. 32
  33. 33. Initiating devices CAPABLE OF PLACING THE SYSTEM IN THE ALARM STATE  Photoelectric Smoke Detectors  Heat Detectors,  Ionization Smoke Detectors,  In-duct Smoke Detectors,  Manually Operated Pull Stations  Sprinkler Waterflow Sensors Also Available In Weatherproof And Hazardous Location Versions. 33
  34. 34. Elements of a Control Panel Horns Strobes Outputs 34
  35. 35. Fire Detectors Classification AUTOMATIC DETECTORS SMOKE SPOT PHOTO LASER MULTIBEAM SAMPLING HEAT SPOT MULTI FIXED TEMP ROR T.LINEAR GAS CO LPG/LNG FLAME IR UV 35
  36. 36. PHOTOTECTRIC DETECTOR Light Scattering Principle Sensing Chamber TRANSMITTER (LED) RECEIVER (Photo Diode) Partition Smoke Particles 36
  37. 37. PHOTOTECTRIC DETECTOR Light Scattering Principle • These detectors use a Light-Emitting Diode (LED) that sends a beam of light into a dark chamber. A photo diode sits on the other side of a partition within the chamber. • Smoke particles entering the chamber deflect some of the light rays into the photocell. The photo cell generates a current when exposed to light, and if the current reaches a certain level, the smoke detector alarms. 37
  38. 38. Typical Range  Simplex TrueAlarm photoelectric sensors use a stable, pulsed infrared LED light source and a silicon photodiode receiver to provide consistent and accurate low power smoke sensing. Seven levels of sensitivity are available for each individual sensor, ranging from 0.2% to 3.7% per foot of smoke obscuration. Sensitivities of 0.2%, 0.5%, and 1% are for special applications in clean areas. Standard sensitivities are 1.5%, 2.0%, 2.5%, 3.0%, and 3.7%. Application type and sensitivity are selected and then monitored at the fire alarm control panel. 38
  39. 39. TYPICAL INSTALLATION ABOVE FALSE CEILING 39
  40. 40. TYPICAL INSTALLATION BELOW FALSE/TRUE CEILING 40
  41. 41. A smoke detector is a particle detector so: • Do not install in dusty/dirty environments • Do not use outdoors • Do not spray with aerosols. • Work such as carpentry, welding, and grinding can cause nuisance events. SMOKE DETECTOR – NUISANCE EVENTS 41
  42. 42. LASER TYPE DETECTORS •Used for Early Warning Smoke Detection •Uses a Laser Light Source and receiver • Sensitivity is higher (0.02% to 2%) •As per NFPA 318/76 Spot type Laser Smoke Detectors are for “high value asset protection”. 42
  43. 43. Projected Beam Principle Smoke from the fire in the protected area diffuses the intensity of the beam at the receiver Transmitter Receiver 43
  44. 44.  In a projected Beam Detector, alarms are generated by diffusing the projected light beam by a specified percentage of obscuration. Total beam blockage generally results in a trouble signal.  Wire the receiver unit as a 4-wire detector (separate power and sensing connections to the control panel). Projected Beam Principle 44
  45. 45. Projected Beam Principle Addressable Beam Detector Head Addressable Beam Control Station One Prism on 5000-006 Mounting Bracket Four Prisms on 5000-006 Mounting Bracket 5000-008 Single Prism Adapter on a 5000-005 Alignment Bracket 5000-201 Adjustment Bracket 5000-007 Four Prism Adapter on 5000-005 Alignment Bracket Beam Detector on 5000-005 Alignment Bracket Beam Detector on 5000- 011 Uni-Box 23901 Prism Reflector 45
  46. 46. AIR SAMPLING DETECTION  ASD (Aspirated Smoke Detection)  ASSD (Air Sampling Smoke Detection)  VESDA (Very Early Warning Aspirating Smoke Detection)  FAAST (Fire Alarm Aspiration Sensing Technology)  Works much like a vacuum cleaner. Sucks air from the protected environment via purpose built aspirating pipe and fittings and samples the quality of air passing through the detection laser chamber. 46
  47. 47. ASD PRINCIPLE 47
  48. 48. ASD PRINCIPLE  ASD technology utilizes collective air sampling vs. point detection  A sample of air is collected from multiple sampling holes  Areas of coverage and spacing are the same for both =Sample Hole 48
  49. 49. Controller Display Detail Reference 49
  50. 50. Gases Detected Combustible  Methane  Hydrogen  Propane  Pentane  Gasoline  Alcohol  Ammonia Toxic  Carbon monoxide  Ammonia  Hydrogen sulfide  Nitrogen dioxide  Sulfur dioxide  Chlorine Other  Oxygen deficiency  Oxygen enrichment  Carbon dioxide 50
  51. 51. Reliability Benefits  Excellent false alarm immunity to dust, steam, insects, objects and structural movement  Eliminates false alarms by automatically compensating for building movement  No moving motor parts eliminates hardware failures  Operates in all ambient lighting conditions  Not affected by nearby reflecting surfaces  No false alignment due to reflecting on fog  Ability to compensate for high air movement 51
  52. 52. Financial Benefits  Low implementation costs because of simple and fast installation and alignment -Only the Imager unit has to be wired (battery powered Emitters) -Power can be supplied from panel -Fast and simple coarse manual alignment  Lower maintenance cost for larger areas -Test filter at the Imager or Emitter -No intervention costs for misalignment 52
  53. 53. ASD USES 53
  54. 54. ASD USES  Atriums  Power generation facilities  Data Centre  Water, waste and sewage treatment facilities  Industrial – mining, steel mills, petro-chemical, wood, pulp and paper  Stadiums  Historic / Cultural Buildings  Tunnels  Logistics  Generator Turbine Halls  Stadiums  Event Centers  Concert Halls  Airports  Train Stations  Long Corridors  Industrial infrastructure  Large Open Spaces 54
  55. 55. Duct Detectors  Photoelectric detector mounted in housing outside the ductwork that has probes that extend into the duct to sample the air inside the duct.  Primarily used as a smoke control device to control the flow of air in ductwork. 55
  56. 56. Duct Detectors 56
  57. 57. Duct Detectors 57
  58. 58. Heat Detectors  Heat detectors are the oldest type of automatic fire detection device.  Not considered direct Life Safety devices, these detectors do contribute to the detection of a fire. 58
  59. 59. HEAT DETECTOR HEATDETECTORS FIXED TEMPARATURE Fusible link (melts) Thermistor (electronic) Bi‐metal RATE OF RISE Thermistor (electronic) Pneumatic (air chamber) COMBINATION Fixed Temp. & Rate‐of‐Rise 59
  60. 60. Heat Detectors FIXED TEMPARATURE  Initiates alarm when the sensing element reaches a certain set point.  Two common ones have 135 and 200-degrees F range. The Fixed element is generally a non- restorable type, and when activated, must be replaced.  Typical Range: Fixed temperature sensing is independent of rate-of-rise sensing and selectable to operate at 135° F (57.2° C) or 155° F (68° C). 60
  61. 61.  Respond when the rate of temperature increase is greater than an allowable limit  Typical Range: Rate-of-rise temperature detection is selectable at the control panel for either 15° F (8.3° C) or 20° F (11.1° C) per minute.  In a slow developing fire, the temperature may not increase rapidly enough to operate the rate- of-rise feature. However, an alarm will be initiated when the temperature reaches its selected fixed temperature setting. Heat Detectors RATE OF RISE TEMPARATURE 61
  62. 62. Multi Criteria Detector • Photo + Heat (Individual) • Photo + Heat (Work together) • Photo + CO (Individual & together) 62
  63. 63. LINEAR HEAT DETECTOR  There are many situations when conventional heat or smoke fire detectors only work to a limited degree, if at all.  For example; dusty or dirty areas, areas with exhaust fumes, areas with high humidity, freezing fog, or areas subjected to high vibration.  Also, if there is no access to the detectors after installation, a maintenance-free sensor would be desirable. 63
  64. 64. LHD-Typical Applications • Cable tunnels & ducts • Road & rail Tunnels • Petro-chemical storage tank rim seals • Conveyor belts • Electric rooms • High rise warehouse stacking • Escalators and moving walkways • Paint shops & spray booths • Ceiling voids & attic spaces • Marine engine rooms • Electrical switchgear cabinets • Oil rig & off shore systems • Steam pipe leaks & trace heating faults • Aircraft hangers • Computer room under voids 64
  65. 65. DIGITAL LHS A small diameter cable which consist of sensing elements which respond to a specific temperature at any point along their length. The inner conductors are coated with a polymer that melts at a predetermined temperature which allows the conductors to make contact with one another and thereby signal an alarm condition at fire alarm panel. Temperature Rating:  155°F (68°C) (typical temperature)  172°F (78°C)  190°F (88°C)  220°F (105°C)  RF Tested: Up to 10,000 linear ft. 65
  66. 66. Analogue LHS A co-axial cable which exerts a defined change in electrical resistance of internal polymers when subjected to changes in surface temperatures. System monitoring through an associated electronic interface unit provides fault indication of open and short circuit conditions on the sensor cable. Features  Rate-Of-Rise and/or Fixed Temperature  Alarm Temp can be set between 70-130℃ with PC Modulator  Dual stage alarm settings (Pre-alarm & alarm)  Open and short circuit watch  Restorable & Reusable coaxial cable (if not damaged in the fire)  System Reset with PC modulator  Cable cover protects from wearing-out and EMI  Max. Zone Length: 200Mtr (656.2 Ft.) 66
  67. 67. LHD in a Double Interlock Pre-action System 67
  68. 68. LHD IN CABLE TRAY 68
  69. 69. Gas Detection CARBON MONOOXIDE 69  CO toxic gas monitoring  CO sensor bases with 520 Hz tone are multi-point devices, use a single IDNet address, and receive communications and sensor power from the IDNet channel (the sounder base requires separate 24 VDC system power or NAC connection) An increased sensitivity algorithm analyzes CO and photoelectric sensor information to allow the presence of CO to increase photoelectric sensitivity for high value locations (museums, electrical equipment rooms, etc)
  70. 70. Gas Detection LPG/LNG  Once gas has built up undetected, simple activities such as turning on light switches can provide a source of ignition, potentially causing an explosion.  Detects Liquefied Petroleum Gas and Liquefied Natural Gas and gives a 85dB alarm  Either be used as a stand- alone device or it can be directly wired to a solenoid valve or control panel/alarm system. 70
  71. 71. Flame Detector  Unrivalled black body rejection over a wide range of source temperatures  Triple waveband infrared solar blind flame detection for optimum false alarm immunity  Discrimination of optical faults (dirty windows) from other faults in the built-in self-test  Range adjustable to 50 meters for a 0.1m2 n-heptane pan fire  Conventional Device, needs addressable module to be connected with FDA 71
  72. 72. MANUAL CALL POINT TYPICAL INSTALLATION 72
  73. 73. MANUAL CALL POINTS 1. SINGLE /DOUBLE ACTION 2. BREAK GLASS PUSH • Optional Features – Surface Box – Weatherproof – Explosion proof – Institutional – Typically include glass rod – With and without key locks or hex key locks – With auxiliary contacts – Multiple languages, even dual languages. – With a pre-signal feature – With screw-terminal or pigtail connections – Conventional and Addressable – Metal or Polycarbonate – Pre-Signal Option: activates when the lever is pulled. 73
  74. 74. MANUAL CALL POINTS Dual Action Explosion-Proof and Weather-Proof Manual Station NFPA STANDARD, UL LISTED BREAK GLASS TYPE MANUAL PUSH STATION, VdS APPROVED, BLOW UP VIEW 74
  75. 75. WATERFLOW DETECTORS  A device or switch that initiates an Alarm condition indicating the flow of water within a sprinkler system.  Other common names are flow switch and riser flow switch. WATERFLOW DETECTOR/ FLOW SWITCH 75
  76. 76. SUPERVISORY SIGNAL INITIATING DEVICE Low Air Supervisory Switch Control valve supervisory switch OS&Y Gate Valve supervisory switch Water level indicator Low‐air pressure switch on a dry‐pipe sprinkler system. A change of state signals an off‐normal (Supervisory) 76
  77. 77. SUPERVISORY SWITCHES  monitor the open position of an Outside Screw and Yoke (OS&Y) type gate valve.  NEMA 3R-rated enclosure  Switches shall be mounted so as not to interfere with the normal operation of the valve and shall be adjusted to operate within two revolutions of the valve control or when the stem has moved no more than one-fifth of the distance from its normal position. 77
  78. 78. NOTIFICATION devices
  79. 79. Indicating appliances ANNOUNCE BUILIDNG OCCUPANTS OR AT A REMOTE LOCATION WHEN THE SYSTEM ENTERS THE ALARM STATE  Horns,  Sirens  Strobe Lights,  Chimes,  Bells,  Combination Units. Also Available In Weatherproof And Hazardous Location Versions. 79
  80. 80. Emergency Communications Display Interface  Normal building video message displays to be controlled  Resides in an on-site computer  Control of the video feed using a  Output through separate VGA switch, or providing an RSS message feed  Computers require a serial port for control panel communications and a second serial port 80
  81. 81. Network NAC Synchronization All Appliances across Networked “ES” Panels are Synchronized Atrium Second Floor West Atrium First Floor West Atrium Second Floor East Atrium First Floor East 81
  82. 82. Visible Notification Appliances with Synchronized Flash 82 Visual signaling appliances are used in high-noise environments, in areas occupied by hearing- impaired individuals, or in areas where audible devices may not be desired.
  83. 83. Audible Notification Appliances For High Noise/ Open Areas  Horn sound up to 114 dBA at 10’-0" (3m)  Swiveled through 180° horizontally and 90° vertically outdoor/weatherproof option  Can be used where standard bells or horns are not satisfactory, particularly in areas of high noise level. 83 Horn/Siren Multiple Tone Signal
  84. 84. Audible Notification Appliances 84 Audible Only (AO) • Design when area is at maximum noise level. • UL typically rates dB @ 10 ft. on axis. • Lose about 6 dBA for distance doubled. • Space approx. 40’ on center. • Typically installed in all multi- person / common areas separated by a door from other audible devices. • Closed doors and walls lose approximately. 20 dBA.
  85. 85. Wall Mount Weatherproof Notification Appliances  Weatherproof Notification Appliances For Extended Temperature And Humidity Range  Rugged, high impact, flame retardant thermoplastic housing with clear lens  Standard models are red and available with FIRE or FEU lettering; configured models are available with additional lettering of FEU/FIRE, ALERT, and blank, and in white with each lettering  Mounting is to matching weatherproof boxes (required), ordered separately  Separate covers are available to change application type on- site or for replacement  Enclosure is rated NEMA 3R 85
  86. 86. Addressable Speakers  Complete family of wall ceiling mount speakers  Individually identified, supervised and controlled speakers  Each speaker has a unique address allowing individual unit supervision, control, and configuration  Unit disconnection or failure is quickly detected, pinpointed, and reported  Revolutionary self-test capability  Testing is fast, easy, and non-disruptive  Test information for each appliance is stored in the panel  T-tap audio and highly flexible NAC wiring  Easier to design, install, expand and modify  Use less wiring, smaller gauge wiring, and power supplies and batteries
  87. 87. Multi Point Devices • Multi I/O Module (3 inputs/ 2 outputs) • Inputs and outputs are individually monitored and controlled • Applications include monitoring fire contacts such as extinguishing system control, ventilation control, fire door control
  88. 88. Control Module Strobe Synchronization Modules 88 • Convert conventional Notification Appliance Circuits (NACs) into SmartSync circuits or synchronized strobe circuits • Combine separate horn and strobe NAC inputs into a 2-wire control that can silence horns while maintaining synchronized strobe operation • Synchronized Flash Modules provide a 2-wire synchronized strobe output that also operates compatible 24 VDC conventional reverse polarity notification appliances • Separate particular one for CO notification
  89. 89. Color Touchscreen LCD Annunciators/ Repeater Panel/ Annunciation Panel  Provides the display features of the fire alarm control panel at a remote location  LED status indicators include Alarm, Priority 2, Supervisory, Trouble, Alarm Silenced, and Status of AC Power at the control panel 89
  90. 90. Emergency Communications Display Interface  Normal building video message displays to be controlled  Resides in an on-site computer  Control of the video feed  Output through separate VGA switch, or providing an RSS message feed  Computers require a serial port for control panel communications and a second serial port 90
  91. 91. GRAPHICAL INTERFACE 91
  92. 92. GRAPHICAL INTERFACE  Custom alarm and system messages can intuitively guide emergency responders  Auto-jump allows the screen view to automatically jump to a graphic at a predetermined zoom level with the active device centered on the screen; alternately, the system can be selected to auto-jump to the Alarm List window  Personal computer based annunciator  Server with Local Client & Remote Clients  Displays Alarm, Supervisory, Priority 2, and Trouble conditions with numerical tallies for each  Quad monitor support allows multiple active windows, or run separate client/server instances on individual 92
  93. 93. LED Annunciators  LED annunciator for use with the fire alarm control panel  Information is transmitted over one twisted, shielded pair  24 Red/Yellow LEDs, jumper selectable  Low current consumption  Supervised / Unsupervised  Surface mount on standard electrical box  18 gauge steel casing 93
  94. 94. Response Indicator  Provides remote annunciation of fire alarm troubles  Loud piercing sound  Easy to install  Standard single gang box mount  Dry contact activation  Yellow LED illuminates and a low frequency  Piezo sounds upon activation  Will be reset when the controlling contact is reset 94
  95. 95. Other devices connected with FDA
  96. 96. Input Modules/ MONITOR MODULE • Interfaces N.O. devices to a Signaling Line Circuit High Temperature Heat Detectors Conventional Class ‘B’ Circuit Resistor Input Module SLC Circuit Class ‘B’ Addressable devices on this circuit
  97. 97. INPUT MODULE 97
  98. 98. Auxiliary Relay Circuits/ OUTPUT MIODULE/ CONTROL MODULE • Contacts of CR control relay R. • The contacts of R control higher voltage and current circuits, i.e. fan motor. Control Relays Power on/off SLC DVR Heat SLC Out Control Relay CR R DVR Power on/off OR N.O. N.C. Relay R has high voltage and current contacts Low voltage Power source R M Source 120 Vac or greater Motor Systems using N.C. Contacts are Called ‘failsafe’ Contacts Fans using a ‘controller’ can usually be controlled directly from a single CR relay
  99. 99. Door Release Circuit Power on/off Door Holder/Releases SLC Out Control Relay CR on/off N.C. Low voltage Power source Systems using N.C. Contacts are Called ‘failsafe’ Contacts Power DH DH Power on/off Low voltage Power source DH DH Using Alarm contacts in panel Contacts of CR control relay control door holders DH above. Panel alarm contacts control door holders DH on the left.
  100. 100. Air Handler Unit Shutdown A control function provided by a fire detection system to shutdown air handler units in order to prevent further spread of smoke and or toxic chemicals as a result of a fire condition. Typical AHU components 1. Supply Duct 2. Fan Compartment 3. Vibration Isolators 4. Heating and/or cooling coil 5. Filter compartment 6. Return and fresh air duct
  101. 101. Lift Control 101  STOP THE ELEVATOR or  BRING TO THE GROUND FLOOR or  MOVE TO THE TOP FLOOR
  102. 102. Smoke Management 102  Smoke is the major killer in fires  Can fill stairwells and elevator shafts, blocking both evacuation and firefighting  Smoke control systems reduce the number of smoke-related injuries and deaths  Shut down the air handling fans and the smoke dampers in the air ducts to prevent the spread of smoke and flame
  103. 103. Extra Action Taken by the Fire Alarm System  Turn off electricity and gas in kitchens (shunt)  Capture the elevators  Turn off the electricity in computer rooms (Emergency Power Off or EPO)  Turn on a deluge sprinkler system to extinguish a fire  Activate a preaction sprinkler system to allow it to extinguish fire  Unlock doors to allow exit  Lock doors to prevent entrance  Close smoke barriers or smoke curtains to prevent the spread of smoke or flame  Release door holders on fire doors to prevent the spread of smoke  Activate fire suppression systems (FM200, Halon, Dry Agent, Etc.) 103
  104. 104. Control Panel Basics
  105. 105. ALARM or FIRE ALARM event Outside Door Corridor East Wing FIRE ALARM 02:36:00 A001 D000 001 Alarm Active A warning of fire danger. A signal initiated by a fire alarm‐initiating device such as a manual fire alarm box, automatic fire detector, waterflow switch, or other device in which activation is indicative of the presence of a fire or fire signature.
  106. 106. Supervisory event 02:37:00 P001 D000 001 Supv Active Post Indicator Valve North Lawn An initiating device such as a valve switch, water level indicator, or low air pressure switch on a dry pipe sprinkler system in which the change of state signals an off normal condition. SUPV A warning of sprinkler or other fire system impairment.
  107. 107. Trouble event 02:38:00 P001 D000 001 Trbl Active Smoke Detector Room 138 TROUBLE A warning of fire alarm system impairment. A signal initiated by the fire alarm system or device indicative of a fault in a monitored circuit or component.
  108. 108. Monitor event Abcdefghijklmnopqrst Abcdefghijklmnopqrst Abcdefghijklmnopqrst abcdefghijklmnopqrst Monitor Use for status monitoring type events An indication the system has a monitor event active. A signal initiated by the fire alarm system when a device programmed for monitor is active. A monitor message exist in the display queue.
  109. 109. A warning the system has a ground fault active. Ground fault event Abcdefghijklmnopqrst Abcdefghijklmnopqrst Abcdefghijklmnopqrst abcdefghijklmnopqrst GROUND FAULT A signal initiated by the fire alarm system when a ‘live’ conductor has a low impedance connection to ground Trouble is also active.
  110. 110. Service Detector event Abcdefghijklmnopqrst Abcdefghijklmnopqrst Abcdefghijklmnopqrst abcdefghijklmnopqrst SERVICE DETECTOR Is this a trouble? A warning the system has one or more detectors requiring service. A signal initiated by the fire alarm system when a detector needs service such as cleaning.
  111. 111. Signal Silence Abcdefghijklmnopqrst Abcdefghijklmnopqrst Abcdefghijklmnopqrst abcdefghijklmnopqrst SIGNAL SILENCE An user initiated action to silence all the alarm signals on the system. • The signal silence LED turns on steady when the signals are silenced. • Signal silence puts the system in trouble.
  112. 112. Acknowledge / Panel Silence Abcdefghijklmnopqrst Abcdefghijklmnopqrst Abcdefghijklmnopqrst abcdefghijklmnopqrst All active events are Acknowledged ACK/PANEL SILENCE An user initiated action to silence the panel’s internal signal.
  113. 113. A user initiated action intended to restore the system to normal. Reset Abcdefghijklmnopqrst Abcdefghijklmnopqrst Abcdefghijklmnopqrst abcdefghijklmnopqrst Reset Pressing RESET starts the reset sequence. During reset, the LED flashes. To complete successfully, all devices and circuits must be normal.
  114. 114. • The drill LED turns on when drill is active. • Drill activates only the audible and visible signals. Drill Abcdefghijklmnopqrst Abcdefghijklmnopqrst Abcdefghijklmnopqrst abcdefghijklmnopqrst DRILL A user initiated action to sound a fire drill signal.
  115. 115. Remote Disconnect Abcdefghijklmnopqrst Abcdefghijklmnopqrst Abcdefghijklmnopqrst abcdefghijklmnopqrst REMOTE DISCON A user initiated action to turn off the connection to a central monitoring station. • The remote disconnect LED turns on steady when the central station is turned off. • Remote Disconnect puts the system in trouble.
  116. 116. VOICE COMMUNICATION SYSTEM ONE-WAY, PUBLIC ADDRESS SYSTEM  Alarm/evacuation signal generation with multiple built-in tones  Standard or customized digital message storage and message generation  Automatic or manual operation  Mass Notification operation  Integrated with FDA or separated standalone system 116
  117. 117. VOICE COMMUNICATION SYSTEM Both One and Two Way 117
  118. 118.  Simultaneously talk with up to 6 remote telephones  Ring signal hold signal  Telephone circuits are supervised  connected to each other in the event of a communications loss 118 VOICE COMMUNICATION SYSTEM Two Way- FIRE FIGHTING TELEPHONE
  119. 119. Reading a Basic Layout Drawing of FDA 119
  120. 120. THANK YOU Q&A 120

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