Presentation - evolution of listening

581 views

Published on

Presentation slides for AQR-QRCA Worldwide Conference on Qualitative REsearch, Prague, 2010.

Based on expert interviews.

A detailed paper is also available for download here (scan the other presentations)

Published in: Business, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
581
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
6
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
5
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • I spoke to several experts about Marketing Research Online Communities to put this presentation together.I am not one of the experts, I am, like most of you, a learner in this field.So let me start by thanking the experts who contributed their time and knowledge to help me understand what’s going on in this area so I could tell you about it… Matt Foley of Plugged In Kathy Fitzpatrick of QualVu Liz Van Patten of Van Patten Research Manila Austin, Diane Hessan, and Julie WittesSchlack of CommunispaceDiane Hessan, President and CEO of Communispace made a plea that we try to eliminate the harsh and geophysical sounding MROC in favour of the term Insight Community, hence my title. Although I think it may be too late.What I want to do is position these new marketing research tools in the context of the evolution of insight approaches, tell you about what drives the success of this method, and what trends the experts see for the future.This session will not be about the tools and technology
  • We know what that is. Most of us live in one. At least I do, and you look civilized.So that part is not entirely new.
  • As people involved in marketing, we know that it is EXTREMELY difficult to change human behavior patterns.Getting people to do something entirely new is a tough hill to climb.It’s a much better strategy to figure out what people have been doing and then help them do more of it, do it faster, do it better.Same thing here.
  • One of the things people will tell you is an advantage of having a community is that it can potentially speed up response time for qualitative projects. This is true. However, it’s like having an expressway speed up traffic. You have to build it and maintain it first, then it’s fast.
  • One of the things people will tell you is an advantage of having a community is that it can potentially speed up response time for qualitative projects. This is true. However, it’s like having an expressway speed up traffic. You have to build it and maintain it first, then it’s fast.
  • One of the things people will tell you is an advantage of having a community is that it can potentially speed up response time for qualitative projects. This is true. However, it’s like having an expressway speed up traffic. You have to build it and maintain it first, then it’s fast.
  • One of the things people will tell you is an advantage of having a community is that it can potentially speed up response time for qualitative projects. This is true. However, it’s like having an expressway speed up traffic. You have to build it and maintain it first, then it’s fast.For ad-hoc speed, you still need some of the older methods.
  • Note that this chart is really here to put these developments in context – we have MANY new ways of connecting. There’s been a revolution in communication technology, and these online communities leverage this technology.But they do not stand apart from the social changes that are driving this interest in connecting in new ways.
  • It’s a bit like thinking, if we put people in a good enough focus group facility, they won’t need the moderator.Right?How’s that going for you?
  • An online community that does not have these characteristics is essentially a public forum. You don’t know who is talking (or who you are talking to, if you are a participant). Members make a commitment to participateThey are recruited and screened.The researcher knows who they are.
  • Leave you with this final thought, a very inspiring thought, and one we must never forget.
  • Leave you with this final thought, a very inspiring thought, and one we must never forget.
  • Presentation - evolution of listening

    1. 1. The evolution of listening The qualitative heart of insight communitiesSusan AbbottThe Worldwide Conference on Qualitative ResearchMay 19-21,2010Prague 1
    2. 2. I went on a journey into the heart of MROC’sto find out what’s going on Slide 2
    3. 3. Your basic IDI project … thanks to Manila Austin, Director of Research, Communispace Kathy Fitzpatrick, Director, QualVu Matt Foley, PluggedIn Co Diane Hessan, President + CEO, Communispace Jim Longo, Vice-President, Itracks Dana Slaughter, Head Honcho, Slaughter Branding Liz Van Patten, Principal, Van Patten Research Julie Wittes Schlack, Senior Vice President, Innovation, Communispace Slide 3
    4. 4. I found out what’s at the heart of theseInsight Communities but first … 4
    5. 5. A community is … …an interacting population …a group of people with a common characteristic or interest 5
    6. 6. People will tell you that these are an entirelynew thing But that’s not entirely true Slide 6
    7. 7. Actually, insight communities are more like anevolution in listening except the earlier versions are still here … and still useful. 7
    8. 8. In the beginning – mostly synchronousAsynchronous DiariesSynchronous Interviews Customer Focus Customer Advisory groups labs Boards Hours Days - weeks Months Years 8
    9. 9. Then the WWW comes along… Bulletin boards/ discussion forums Customer Advisory Boards Online DiariesAsynchronous DiariesSynchronous Web-meetings Online focus groups Interviews Customer Focus Customer Advisory groups labs Boards Hours Days - weeks Months Years 9
    10. 10. Texting (SMS) and Flip video … SMS / Video self-ethnography Texting Bulletin boards/ discussion forums Customer Advisory Online Diaries BoardsAsynchronous DiariesSynchronous Web-meetings Online focus groups Interviews Customer Focus Customer Advisory groups labs Boards Hours Days - weeks Months Years 10
    11. 11. Insight communities draw on all of this SMS / Video Texting Bulletin boards/ discussion forums Customer Advisory Boards Online DiariesAsynchronous Diaries We have a LOT more tools at our disposalSynchronous Web-meetings Online focus groups Interviews Customer Focus Customer Advisory groups labs Boards Hours Days - weeks Months Years 11
    12. 12. These developments did not happen inisolation 12
    13. 13. Internet enabled connectivity on anexponential growth curve … gives people so many new ways to connect! 13
    14. 14. Community interface looks familiar --just like other social media Images courtesy of Matt Foley at PluggedIn 14
    15. 15. Home page 15
    16. 16. Blog Slide 16
    17. 17. Hybriddiscussion Slide 17
    18. 18. Memberhome page Slide 18
    19. 19. Photoalbum Slide 19
    20. 20. It’s all about the technology Slide 20
    21. 21. It’s NOT all about the technology Slide 21
    22. 22.  It’s not about the technology platform. Thinking “if you build it, they will come” is wrong.  Julie Wittes Schlack, Communispace Slide 22
    23. 23.  Some people think that if you invite people, they are going to just naturally start talking. Even if they have a very strong affinity, or shared background, or passion, you still need somebody in there actively, actively facilitating the conversation.  Matt Foley, PluggedIn Co. Slide 23
    24. 24. An Insight Community is created specificallyto gather insights Purposeful Focused Directed Exclusive Private This makes a difference. 24
    25. 25. Insight communities honor the researchprocess, unlike public communities Plan Fieldwork Analyze CommunicateObjectives aren’t a You can analyze abig part of public public communitycommunities, but for trends. Link it all back tothey are essential to actionable insightsinsight communities Public Communities at best are lightly moderated. 90% are lurkers. No one probes. Activities mostly the same. Troll behavior. 25
    26. 26.  Clearly define your objectives, this is the most common oversight. Insight communities are not about Q+A. They are more about engagement and listening for opportunities that match the objectives.  Jim Longo, Itracks Slide 26
    27. 27. Scripted interaction is at the heartWide variety of Platform is an enabler:activities to keep points, profiles, coolpeople engaged tools Research design to ensure project stays on the objectivesActivities to build senseof community Active moderation, probing, m anagement ofAnalysis and communication back to rhythm, pace and flowclient. Client team helps absorb and acton learning Slide 27
    28. 28.  The role of the facilitator is critical. The software is an enabler, it makes everything possible.  Manila Austin, Communispace Slide 28
    29. 29. Emerging team model of research Designer Moderator Community Manager Translates objectives Launches the Builds excitement, into activities. Like activities in the rapport, makes sure writing discussion community, probes, fo people are having a guide llows up. good time. Manages invitations and incentives. Like a facility hostess. Model courtesy of Matt Foley 29
    30. 30.  Many of the communities I work in will have at least a weekly group forum discussion and in-depth studies anywhere from 4-6 times a year. Although one community I work in has almost 40 in-depth studies per year.  Dana Slaughter, Slaughter Branding 30
    31. 31. Video clips 31
    32. 32.  I recently called Tom Brailsford, of Hallmark to ask him, 10 years later, what have you learned? Here’s what he told me:  Diane Hessan, Communispace 32
    33. 33.  “Never underestimate the power of N=1”  33
    34. 34. Thank you! Please read the paper for much more! 34

    ×