| TÜV Rheinland. Precisely Right. Introduction of  ISO26000:2010 Guidance on social responsibility
<ul><li>1872 Entrepreneurs take the initiative in setting up the DÜV  to ensure the safety of their manufacturing plant </...
<ul><li>Over 79 associated companies abroad at 340 locations in 62 countries around the world. </li></ul><ul><li>Wherever ...
<ul><li>Belief in fundamental human values </li></ul><ul><li>Increasing awareness of business practices & their impact </l...
<ul><li>Faces pressure from consumers, investors and NGO’s </li></ul><ul><li>Supports human values </li></ul><ul><li>Wishe...
Many CSR initiatives <ul><li>Core issues addressed are not equal </li></ul><ul><li>Not all responsibility issues addressed...
1. 2. 3. <ul><li>2001: need for SR standard identified by ISO/COPOLCO, committee on consumer policy.  </li></ul><ul><li>20...
<ul><li>Much debate focussed on the intend of the standard. The following was agreed: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>ISO 26000 cont...
Structure of the standard
Structure of the standard
Definition of “Social Responsibility” <ul><li>Responsibility of an  organization  (2.12) for the impacts of its decisions ...
Definition of “ Sustainable development  ” <ul><li>Development that meets the needs of the present without compromising th...
Investors Social Responsibilty Workers Manufacturers Workers’ families Suppliers & Sub-contractors Governments Local commu...
Principles of Social Responsibility <ul><li>ISO 26000 defines overreaching 7 principles of social responsibility: </li></u...
Social responsibility core subjects
Standards compared        ISO  26000  Community Involvement  Consumer Issues   Fair Operating Practices   Env...
Social responsibility core subjects <ul><li>Organisational Governance </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Decision-making processes and ...
Social responsibility core subjects <ul><li>Fair Operating Practices </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Anti-corruption; Responsible po...
Social responsibility core subjects <ul><li>Coverage of each core subject by ISO 26000: </li></ul><ul><li>Overview: genera...
Social responsibility core subjects <ul><li>Example for expectations  </li></ul><ul><li>Core subject “Consumer Issues” </l...
How to implement ISO 26000 <ul><li>Consider the characteristics of social responsibility and its relationship with sustain...
Benefits of implementation <ul><li>What benefits can be achieved by implementing ISO 26000? </li></ul><ul><li>The percepti...
More info: www.iso.org/sr
More info: www.iso.org/sr
Thank you for your attention! For any question, please contact: Mr. Andreas Münch   TUV Rheinland (China) Ltd. Email:  [em...
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Iso26000 2011 02-25

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Iso26000 2011 02-25

  1. 1. | TÜV Rheinland. Precisely Right. Introduction of ISO26000:2010 Guidance on social responsibility
  2. 2. <ul><li>1872 Entrepreneurs take the initiative in setting up the DÜV to ensure the safety of their manufacturing plant </li></ul><ul><li>1904 Automobile and driving license tests </li></ul><ul><li>1926 First material analysis laboratory </li></ul><ul><li>1969 International product tests and certifications </li></ul><ul><li>1970 First subsidiary outside of Germany TÜV Academy provides personnel qualification </li></ul><ul><li>1991 System certifications to international standards </li></ul><ul><li>2000 Safety and quality in local and global data and communication networks </li></ul><ul><li>2002 Launch of social auditing </li></ul><ul><li>2006 New division “Life and Health” established </li></ul><ul><li>2007 Office locations on all continents </li></ul>Experience comes with time. And with deeds.
  3. 3. <ul><li>Over 79 associated companies abroad at 340 locations in 62 countries around the world. </li></ul><ul><li>Wherever your market is: We are there already. And at your service with advice and assistance. </li></ul>Facts & Figures. Locations Worldwide.
  4. 4. <ul><li>Belief in fundamental human values </li></ul><ul><li>Increasing awareness of business practices & their impact </li></ul><ul><li>Extended purchasing considerations: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ What is produced ?“ </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Quality & price </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ How is it produced ?” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Environmental issues </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Health & safety issues </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Social & ethical issues </li></ul></ul></ul>Public expectations on corporate responsibility
  5. 5. <ul><li>Faces pressure from consumers, investors and NGO’s </li></ul><ul><li>Supports human values </li></ul><ul><li>Wishes to employ (and be seen to employ) good “corporate citizenship” </li></ul><ul><li>Launched initiatives of varying depth </li></ul>Response of the Business Sector
  6. 6. Many CSR initiatives <ul><li>Core issues addressed are not equal </li></ul><ul><li>Not all responsibility issues addressed </li></ul><ul><li>Limited systematic approach </li></ul><ul><li>Partly exclusive for certain groups </li></ul><ul><li>Focused on industrial supply chain </li></ul><ul><li>Core labor standards are addressed </li></ul><ul><li>Independent external, monitoring and verification </li></ul><ul><li>Evaluation is conducted onsite </li></ul><ul><li>Measure compliance </li></ul>Cons Pros
  7. 7. 1. 2. 3. <ul><li>2001: need for SR standard identified by ISO/COPOLCO, committee on consumer policy. </li></ul><ul><li>2004: international multi-stakeholder conference whether ISO should launch SR work. </li></ul><ul><li>2004: set up of ISO/TMB Working Group „Social Responsibility&quot;, led by SIS (Sweden) and ABNT (Brazil) </li></ul><ul><li>450 experts and 210 observers from 99 ISO member countries and 42 liaison organizations. </li></ul><ul><li>03/2006 – 06/2008: four Working Drafts </li></ul><ul><li>05/2010: Final Draft (FDIS) </li></ul><ul><li>ISO voting (requiring 75% agreement) </li></ul><ul><li>01.11.2010: release of ISO 26000 </li></ul><ul><li>Adoption as national standards </li></ul>Development of ISO 26000
  8. 8. <ul><li>Much debate focussed on the intend of the standard. The following was agreed: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>ISO 26000 contains voluntary GUIDANCE </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>It does NOT set requirements nor determine processes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>It shall NOT be used for certification </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>It can be used by all kind of organisations , not only by corporations: public, private, non-profit, large, small, in developed and developing countries </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>It shall be innovative and mostly complementary to existing standards </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Breakthrough for (C)SR: consensus based common understanding of the term </li></ul><ul><li>Agreed with ILO that ILO has the exclusive right to set labour standards and ISO will have to ask ILO for approval or consent to all related chapters </li></ul><ul><li>The UN Global Compact has also drawn up a similar agreement with ISO regarding the UN GC and its principles </li></ul>What is ISO 26000?
  9. 9. Structure of the standard
  10. 10. Structure of the standard
  11. 11. Definition of “Social Responsibility” <ul><li>Responsibility of an organization (2.12) for the impacts of its decisions and activities on society and the environment (2.6), through transparent and ethical behaviour (2.7) that </li></ul><ul><ul><li>contributes to sustainable development (2.23), including health and the welfare of society; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>takes into account the expectations of stakeholders (2.20); </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>is in compliance with applicable law and consistent with international norms of behaviour (2.11); and </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>is integrated throughout the organization (2.12) and practised in its relationships </li></ul></ul><ul><li>NOTE 1: Activities include products, services and processes. </li></ul><ul><li>NOTE 2: Relationships refer to an organization's activities within its sphere of influence (2.19). </li></ul>
  12. 12. Definition of “ Sustainable development ” <ul><li>Development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs. </li></ul><ul><li>NOTE: Sustainable development is about integrating the goals of a high quality of life, health and prosperity with social justice and maintaining the earth's capacity to support life in all its diversity. These social, economic and environmental goals are interdependent and mutually reinforcing. Sustainable development can be treated as a way of expressing the broader expectations of society as a whole. </li></ul>
  13. 13. Investors Social Responsibilty Workers Manufacturers Workers’ families Suppliers & Sub-contractors Governments Local communities NGO’s Consumers Auditing companies Unions Stakeholders
  14. 14. Principles of Social Responsibility <ul><li>ISO 26000 defines overreaching 7 principles of social responsibility: </li></ul><ul><li>Accountability: being answerable for decisions and activities and their impacts on society, the economy and the environment. </li></ul><ul><li>Transparency: openness about decisions and activities that impact on society and the environment. </li></ul><ul><li>Ethical behavior: in accordance with accepted principles of right or good conduct </li></ul><ul><li>Respect for stakeholder interest: respect, consider and respond to the interests of its stakeholders. </li></ul><ul><li>Respect for rule of law: mandatory </li></ul><ul><li>Respect for international norms of behavior </li></ul><ul><li>Respect for human rights </li></ul>
  15. 15. Social responsibility core subjects
  16. 16. Standards compared        ISO 26000  Community Involvement  Consumer Issues   Fair Operating Practices   Environment      Labour Practices      Human Rights   Org. Governance BSCI SA8000 FLA ETI EICC Core Issues
  17. 17. Social responsibility core subjects <ul><li>Organisational Governance </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Decision-making processes and structures </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Human Rights </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Due diligence; Human rights risk situations; Avoidance of complicity; Resolving grievances; Discrimination and vulnerable groups; Civil and political rights; Economic, social and cultural rights; Fundamental principles and rights at work </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Labour Practices </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Employment and employment relationships; Conditions of work and social protection; Social dialogue; Health and safety at work; Human development and training in the workplace </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Environment </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Prevention of pollution; Sustainable resource use; Climate change mitigation and adaptation; Protection of the environment; Biodiversity and restoration of natural habitats </li></ul></ul>
  18. 18. Social responsibility core subjects <ul><li>Fair Operating Practices </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Anti-corruption; Responsible political involvement; Fair competition; Promoting social responsibility in the value chain; Respect for property rights </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Consumer Issues </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Fair marketing, factual and unbiased information and fair contractual practices; Protecting consumers' health and safety; Sustainable consumption; Consumer service, support, and complaint and dispute resolution; Consumer data protection and privacy; Access to essential services; Education and awareness </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Community Involvement and Development </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Community involvement; Education and culture; Employment creation and skills development; Technology development and access; Wealth and income creation; Health; Social investment </li></ul></ul>
  19. 19. Social responsibility core subjects <ul><li>Coverage of each core subject by ISO 26000: </li></ul><ul><li>Overview: general explanation of the subject </li></ul><ul><li>Principles and considerations </li></ul><ul><li>Details about individual issues: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Description of the issue </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Related actions and expectations (what should be done) </li></ul></ul>
  20. 20. Social responsibility core subjects <ul><li>Example for expectations </li></ul><ul><li>Core subject “Consumer Issues” </li></ul><ul><li>Issue 1: “Fair marketing, factual and unbiased information and fair contractual practices” </li></ul>
  21. 21. How to implement ISO 26000 <ul><li>Consider the characteristics of social responsibility and its relationship with sustainable development (Clause 3) </li></ul><ul><li>Review the principles of social responsibility described in Clause 4 </li></ul><ul><li>Consider two fundamental practices of social responsibility: recognizing social responsibility within the organizations sphere of influence, and identifying and engaging with its stakeholders (Clause 5). </li></ul><ul><li>Analyze the core subjects and issues of social responsibility, as well as each of the related actions and expectations (Clause 6) </li></ul><ul><li>Identify relevant and significant issues of social responsibility </li></ul><ul><li>Integrate social responsibility throughout the organizations decisions and activities, using the guidance provided in Clause 7 </li></ul>
  22. 22. Benefits of implementation <ul><li>What benefits can be achieved by implementing ISO 26000? </li></ul><ul><li>The perception and reality of an organization's performance on social responsibility can influence, among other things: </li></ul><ul><li>Competitive advantage </li></ul><ul><li>Reputation </li></ul><ul><li>Ability to attract and retain workers or members, customers, clients or users </li></ul><ul><li>Maintenance of employees' morale, commitment and productivity </li></ul><ul><li>View of investors, owners, donors, sponsors and the financial community </li></ul><ul><li>Relationship with companies, governments, the media, suppliers, peers, customers and the community in which it operates. </li></ul>
  23. 23. More info: www.iso.org/sr
  24. 24. More info: www.iso.org/sr
  25. 25. Thank you for your attention! For any question, please contact: Mr. Andreas Münch TUV Rheinland (China) Ltd. Email: [email_address] Tel: (86) 10 6566 6660-121

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