Robin Wheelwright NessAMVC265012/7/2011                     WE ARE EARTH: DUST IN THE HANDS OF THE ARTIST
The Dust Collectors"What I have kept is some W.T.C.dust I gathered from the windshieldof a lonely car left abandoned onFul...
Symbolic and Totemic DustJean-Marie Haessle, a French-born artist— hadjust discussed his will with a lawyer in LowerManhat...
Fragmentation"Recovery workers gave these to me while I was volunteering at ground zero. I believe the pin is  from a stee...
―Mere smoke would not blow to and fro in that wild way. It looks more  to me as if it were made of dead men’s souls – such...
“WHERE DOES THE DUST ITSELF COLLECT?           XU BING Manhattan           Memorialization
Xu Bing. Gallery of Wales, Cardiff, 2004
“PHANTOMTOWERS”“They were still verypresent, to us they feltlike phantom limbs.” Having photographedthe dust cloud the nig...
“UNREGISTEREDCITY”    Jiang Pengyi
“LIBRARY OF DUST”                                   David Maisel  Inside the room, in a dim and dusty corner of one of man...
Alchemy and The Victorian               Dust HeapLondon was built, in part, from it‟s own rubbish. Thebrick making industr...
The Great Dustheap, KingssCross, 1837
“Laid to Rest”SERENA KORDAKorda „takes on subject matters thatare often overlooked and highlight‟sthem in new ways.”For “L...
Reanimation/Transformation COLLECTION – TECHNIQUE – CREATION – MARKING –   INSTALLATION – REANIMATION PERFORMANCE[DANCE/MU...
The Great Clean-Up
Magical and Mundane:The Natural Dichotomy of Dust
“DUST SERIES”THOMAS EDWARDS & UJIN LEE
“House Series”FRANCESCA WOODMAN
“Dust consists of objects that have long since lost their identity. Things thathave dried out, decomposed, powered, and sh...
We are Earth: Dust in the Hands of the Artist
We are Earth: Dust in the Hands of the Artist
We are Earth: Dust in the Hands of the Artist
We are Earth: Dust in the Hands of the Artist
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We are Earth: Dust in the Hands of the Artist

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  • WOODMAN [INTRODUCTION]
  • NYTIMES “THE RECKONING” “WHAT WE SAVED”
  • FRAGMENTATION: mundane items, which timing and circumstance have forged into artifacts approaching the sacred. They return us instantly to a moment we have no desire to revisit, but are determined not to forget. They are our Sept. 11 relics. (the reckoning/ what we kept nyt)
  • The dust was present everywhere around Ground Zero, but settled in thicker accumulations in the downwind directions south and east of the complex. The dust settled to a depth of 3 inches in locations as far as six blocks from the World Trade Center. 1 
  • XU BING’S “WHERE DOES THE DUST ITSELF COLLECT?” MANHATTAN 2011: When at place where something special happens, the Chinese artist, Xu Bing “likes to take something from it”. From Tiananmen Square he has a bicycle squashed flat under a tank. He also collected a bag of dust from the streets of Lower Manhattan in the aftermath of 9/11. “When I saw the Twin Towers fall, I felt the world change from that day."
  • Bing first used the dust in an exhibit titled “Where Does the Dust Collect Itself?,” at the National Museum and Gallery of Wales in Cardiff in 2004. In advance of traveling to Cardiff, the Chinese-American artist having been officially branded a political dissident, had a feeling customs officers might take a dim view of his travelling with a bag of white powder in his luggage. The artist, therefore, molded the dust into a small doll, and after arriving in the gallery safely, the figurine was reduced to dust once more in a coffee grinder and blown to the gallery floor, spelling out a seventh century Zen text.
  • PHANTOM TOWERS :Rescue worker = “we have been looking down at this hole, this pit, for so long, and for the first time people are looking up again.” – under consideration to become a permanent addition to the wtc memorial
  • JIANG PENGIthe work of photographer Jiang Pengyi deals with the destruction of Bejing through rapid urbanization.detritus of decaying domestic spaces. Fragmentation.Pengyi presents his lilliputian cities buried in the rubble, against the peeling paint, and amid the collecting dust of the crumbling, abandoned houses left behind in the wake of rampant urbanization.
  • 1913, an Oregon state psychiatric institution began to cremate the remains of its unclaimed patients. Their ashes were then stored inside individual copper canisters and moved into a small room, where they were stacked onto pine shelves. After doing some research into the story, Maisel got in touch with the hospital administrators – the same hospital, it turns out, where they once filmed One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest – and he was granted access to the room in which the canisters were stored.
  • Odd colors ,like dark reds, deep purples, and thick yellows – awaken fears of death “Among my concerns with Library of Dust are the crises of representation that derive from attempts to index or archive the evidence of trauma; the uncanny ability of objects to portray such trauma; and the revelatory possibilities inherent in images of such traumatic disturbances. While there are certainly physical and chemical explanations for the ways these canisters have transformed over time, the canisters also encourage us to consider what happens to our own bodies when we die, and to the souls that occupy them.”
  • The Victorian dustheap provided a major source of income. Everything was sold off and recycled: bones to soapmakers, threadbare linen rags to papermakers, coarse cinders were sold to brickmakers, - ["Dust, or Ugliness Redeemed," an essay by the poet R. H. Horne that appeared in Household Words] The Victorian dust heaps “were a monument to the invisible” and supported a wide range of industries including brick making. Searchers and Sorters" scaled the debris and painstakingly raked through the refuse, separating animal and vegetable matter from broken pottery, bones, rags, metal, glass, and other detritus. Everything was sold off and recycled: bones to soapmakers, threadbare linen rags to papermakers, coarse cinders were sold to brickmakers, -The brick making industry was born from the dust heap when the ash, cinders and rubbish were mixed with rich red clay mud from nearby fields. The Incorporation of dust into the clay reduced the firing temperature and This is how the dust and dirt of London were transformed into the material from which the expanding city was built.   This dust heap was removed in 1848 to assist in rebuilding the city of Moscow, Russia. – sold for …subsequently sold for forty thousand pounds, and was exported to Russia to rebuild Moscow.The dust heap was removed in 1848 to assist in rebuilding the city of Moscow, Russia. – sold for …subsequently sold for forty thousand pounds, and was exported to Russia to rebuild Moscow.
  • Watercolor by This dust heap was sold for forty thousand pounds, and was exported to Russia in 1848 to rebuild Moscow.
  • makes public works from researching of abandoned histories”. The project was very much inspired by the idea of people finding their fortune in the dust heap of Gray’s Inn Rd. I became fascinated with the commerce and industry that is embodied in waste and the fact that the waste we produce forms the basis of our civilisation and can be transformed in to ‘gold’. ALCHEMICAL
  • The project involved the artist collecting samples of dust from all sorts of different places, Transformed the invisible to the visible,
  • “Laid to Rest was commissioned was held (dates) at the London-based Wellcome Collection, and set out to "uncover a rich history of disgust and delight in the grimy truths and dirty secrets of our past." Between May and October 1911, more than five million people flocked to Dresden, Germany, to visit the First International Hygiene Exhibition. Its success led to the founding of the Deutsches Hygiene-Museum, which in 1930 opened its own purpose-built home - an architectural monument to rationality and transparency in modern medical science.”
  •  We owe much of the beauty of the world to dust.  Cabinet 71…Dust will always be both there and not there; what is left and what is gone. Archive p163
  • THOMAS EDWARDS AND UJIN LEE
  • OLIVER VALSECCHI LEFT / WTC DUST ON WOMAN ON RIGHT Dust will always be both there and not there; what is left and what is gone. Archive p163Dust is simultaneously dispersive and concentrating. “An emblem of death, decay and dissolution, it is also powerfully regenerative”
  • Woodman moves through the dilapidated space, her body appearing to meld into the house itself”
  • “In Woodman’s houses, disorder reigns. Disorder, which the anthropologist Mary Douglas argued symbolises both danger and power (95),
  • Indescernable identities
  • YOU AND I ARE EARTH & EARTH AS DUST SPECK
  • We are Earth: Dust in the Hands of the Artist

    1. 1. Robin Wheelwright NessAMVC265012/7/2011 WE ARE EARTH: DUST IN THE HANDS OF THE ARTIST
    2. 2. The Dust Collectors"What I have kept is some W.T.C.dust I gathered from the windshieldof a lonely car left abandoned onFulton Street, near Nassau Street.I scooped up the dust on Saturday,Sept. 15, 2001, and brought ithome in a small bag that I hadfound. When home, I transferredthe dust to a jar, where it has beensince."- James Marturano
    3. 3. Symbolic and Totemic DustJean-Marie Haessle, a French-born artist— hadjust discussed his will with a lawyer in LowerManhattan — began hustling back uptown afterthe collapse of the first tower. But, in an action hecan describe only as reflexive, he stopped longenough to scoop up dust with an envelope on WallStreet ―I don’t know why, I don’t know why,‖ Mr.Haessle, now 71, said. ―As an artist, I feel thisgigantic, beautiful structure, reduced to thisamazingly thin powder. To me, even today, it’s just....‖"We live in Greenwich Village. During the daysafter Sept. 11, soot and ashes rained down overour neighborhood and poured into our openwindow. A lot accumulated on the windowsill and itdidnt seem right to throw it away. We gathered itin a jar, which we still keep until this day. -Joanneand Kevin Goodman―I ran down to the World Trade Center after theattacks on Sept. 11, when I was still in school, andfelt such a sense of loneliness after taking note ofmy surroundings, the air thick, and seemingly still,weighted down by the snowlike material coveringevery street. I filled my backpack with the debris,and completed this conceptual artwork out ofacrylic/plexi in October 2001." - Eric Parnes
    4. 4. Fragmentation"Recovery workers gave these to me while I was volunteering at ground zero. I believe the pin is from a steel beam. There is a fragment of marble, and to me the most disturbing artifact, glassfrom one of the towers. I do not display these at home. They have been in a drawer for over nine years." -Stephanie ZesssosI was a New York City police officer and picked up a thin ribbon of metal from the site. I feel kindof dumb because it didnt occur to me that there were others doing this kind of thing. I didnt want a souvenir, but I wanted something tactile just so I knew it really happened. – Dante Messina
    5. 5. ―Mere smoke would not blow to and fro in that wild way. It looks more to me as if it were made of dead men’s souls – such of them as are not yet gone where they have to go, and may be flitting hither and thither, doubting, themselves, of the fittest place for them‖. – Ruskin‟s 1870 diary
    6. 6. “WHERE DOES THE DUST ITSELF COLLECT? XU BING Manhattan Memorialization
    7. 7. Xu Bing. Gallery of Wales, Cardiff, 2004
    8. 8. “PHANTOMTOWERS”“They were still verypresent, to us they feltlike phantom limbs.” Having photographedthe dust cloud the nightbefore, they had the ideato “re-sculpt the dustcloud into towers”.
    9. 9. “UNREGISTEREDCITY” Jiang Pengyi
    10. 10. “LIBRARY OF DUST” David Maisel Inside the room, in a dim and dusty corner of one of many abandoned buildings on thedecaying campus of the Oregon State Hospital here, are 3,489 copper urns, the shiny metal dull and smeared with corrosion, the canisters turning green. The urns hold the ashes of mental patients who died here from the late 1880s to the mid- 1970s. The remains were unclaimed by families who had long abandoned their sick relatives, when they were alive and after they were dead.
    11. 11. Alchemy and The Victorian Dust HeapLondon was built, in part, from it‟s own rubbish. Thebrick making industry was born from the dust heap when the ash, cinders and rubbish were mixed with rich red clay mud from nearby fields.
    12. 12. The Great Dustheap, KingssCross, 1837
    13. 13. “Laid to Rest”SERENA KORDAKorda „takes on subject matters thatare often overlooked and highlight‟sthem in new ways.”For “Laid to Rest” Korda revived the19th-century technique of creatingbricks partly from the dust of thelocal heaps.”Korda is fascinated with thecommerce and industry that isembodied in waste and the fact thatthe waste we produce forms thebasis of our civilization and can betransformed in to „gold‟.
    14. 14. Reanimation/Transformation COLLECTION – TECHNIQUE – CREATION – MARKING – INSTALLATION – REANIMATION PERFORMANCE[DANCE/MUSIC/PROCESSION] – [RE]BURIAL – MODERN ARCHAEOLOGY
    15. 15. The Great Clean-Up
    16. 16. Magical and Mundane:The Natural Dichotomy of Dust
    17. 17. “DUST SERIES”THOMAS EDWARDS & UJIN LEE
    18. 18. “House Series”FRANCESCA WOODMAN
    19. 19. “Dust consists of objects that have long since lost their identity. Things thathave dried out, decomposed, powered, and shifted in a way that makes theirtrue identities indiscernable.”

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