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Jabberwocky paper

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Jabberwocky paper

  1. 1. I. Text of the poem Jabberwocky By : Lewis Carroll Written in 1871 'Twas brillig, and the slithy toves Did gyre and gimble in the wabe; All mimsy were the borogoves, And the mome raths outgrabe. "Beware the Jabberwock, my son! The jaws that bite, the claws that catch! Beware the Jubjub bird, and shun The frumious Bandersnatch!" He took his vorpal sword in hand: Long time the manxome foe he sought— So rested he by the Tumtum tree, And stood awhile in thought. And as in uffish thought he stood, The Jabberwock, with eyes of flame, Came whiffling through the tulgey wood, And burbled as it came!
  2. 2. One, two! One, two! and through and through The vorpal blade went snicker-snack! He left it dead, and with its head He went galumphing back. "And hast thou slain the Jabberwock? Come to my arms, my beamish boy! O frabjous day! Callooh! Callay!" He chortled in his joy. 'Twas brillig, and the slithy toves Did gyre and gimble in the wabe; All mimsy were the borogoves, And the mome raths outgrabe.
  3. 3. II. Introduction of the poem Jabberwocky” is Carroll’s most well-known poem. It is the first of many nonsense poems set into the text of the English novel Through the Looking-Glass, published in 1872, six years after the more commonly known Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland. Because the poem employs conventional structures of grammar and many familiar words, however, it is not “pure nonsense.” In fact, while both books were composed for the ten-year-old Alice Liddell, it is generally accepted that Carroll’s studies in logic firmly ground the thought beneath the imaginative works, so that adults find as much to appreciate in the novels and poetry as children. The importance of “Jabberwocky” as a central focus of meaning for the novel is indicated by Carroll’s intention that the drawing of the Jabberwock should appear as the title-page illustration for Through the Looking-Glass. In the novel, Alice goes through a mirror into a room and world where things are peculiarly backward. She finds a book in a language she doesn’t know, and when she holds the book up to a mirror, or looking-glass, she is able to read “Jabberwocky,” a mock-heroic ballad in which the identical first and last four lines enclose five stanzas charting the progress of the hero: warning, setting off, meditation and preparation, conquest, and triumphant return.
  4. 4. III. Unknown words of the Poem According to the character of Humpty-Dumpty (one of the character in Through the Looking- Glass Novel : Brillig : four o'clock in the afternoon -- the time when you begin broiling things for dinner. Slithy : slimy and lithe. 'Lithe' is the same as 'active'. Toves : curious creatures that are something like badgers, something like lizards, and something like corkscrews. They make their nests under sun- dials and live on cheese. To gyre : to go round and round like a gyroscope. To gimble : to make holes like a gimblet. Wabe : the grass-plot round a sun-dial. It is called like that because it goes a long way before it, and a long way behind it. And a long way beyond it on each side. Mimsy : miserable and flimsy Mome rath : 'rath' is a sort of green pig. Humpty-Dumpty is not certain about the meaning of 'mome', but thinks it's short for "from home"; meaning that they'd lost their way. To outgrabe : 'outgribing' is something between bellowing and whistling, with a kind of sneeze in the middle. Bandersnatch : A swift moving creature with snapping jaws, capable of extending its neck. suggesting that a 'bandersnatch' might be an animal that hunts the leader of a group. Beamish : Radiantly beaming, happy, cheerful. Although Carroll may have believed he had coined this word, it is cited in the Oxford English Dictionary in 1530. Borogove : a thin shabby-looking bird with its feathers sticking out all round, something like a live mop." In explanatory book notes Carroll describes it further
  5. 5. as "an extinct kind of Parrot. They had no wings, beaks turned up, made their nests under sun-dials and lived on veal." In Hunting of the Snark, Carroll says that the initial syllable of borogove is pronounced as in borrow rather than as in worry. Burbled : In a letter of December 1877, Carroll notes that "burble" could be a mixture of the three verbs 'bleat', 'murmur', and 'warble', although he didn't remember creating it. Chortled : "Combination of 'chuckle' and 'snort'." (OED) Frabjous : Possibly a blend of fair, fabulous, and joyous. Definition from Oxford English Dictionary, credited to Lewis Carroll. Frumious : Combination of "fuming" and "furious". In Hunting of the Snark Carroll comments, "take the two words 'fuming' and 'furious'. Make up your mind that you will say both words, but leave it unsettled which you will say first. Now open your mouth and speak. If your thoughts incline ever so little towards 'fuming', you will say 'fuming-furious'; if they turn, by even a hair's breadth, towards 'furious', you will say 'furious-fuming'; but if you have the rarest of gifts, a perfectly balanced mind, you will say 'frumious'. Galumphing : Perhaps used in the poem a blend of 'gallop' and 'triumphant'. Used later by Kipling, and cited by Webster as "To move with a clumsy and heavy tread" Jabberwocky : When a class in the Girls' Latin School in Boston asked Carroll's permission to name their school magazine The Jabberwock, he replied: "The Anglo-Saxon word 'wocer' or 'wocor' signifies 'offspring' or 'fruit'. Taking 'jabber' in its ordinary acceptation of 'excited and voluble discussion, Jubjub bird : 'A desperate bird that lives in perpetual passion', according to the Butcher in Carroll's later poem The Hunting of the Snark. 'Jub' is an ancient word for a jerkin or a dialect word for the trot of a horse (OED). It might make reference to the call of the bird resembling the sound "jub, jub".
  6. 6. Manxome : Possibly 'fearsome'; A portmanteau of "manly" and "buxom", the latter relating to men for most of its history; or relating to Manx people. Snicker-snack : possibly related to the large knife, the snickersnee. Tulgey : Carroll himself said he could give no source for Tulgey. Could be taken to mean thick, dense, dark. It has been suggested that it comes from the Anglo-Cornish word "Tulgu", 'darkness', which in turn comes from the Cornish language "Tewolgow" 'darkness, gloominess'. Uffish : Carroll noted "It seemed to suggest a state of mind when the voice is gruffish, the manner roughish, and the temper huffish". Vorpal : Carroll said he could not explain this word, though it has been noted that it can be formed by taking letters alternately from "verbal" and "gospel". IV. Analysis of each Stanza Stanza 1 Twas brillig, and the slithy toves Did gyre and gimble in the wabe: All mimsy were the borogoves And the mome raths outgrabe This first stanza is so tightly packed with unknown information that without proper acclimation to the nonsense words, the reader nearly veers off the page in confusion. From here, the poem becomes slightly more approachable, telling the tale of a boy going into the dark and gloomy woods to slay the Jabberwock. The poem is engineered like a small fairy tale, and the use of nonsense words adds a whimsical element that further solidifies the element of the fantastic. Employed within an already heavily fantasy-ridden novel, Carroll strips cohesion and familiarity in the reader to the bone.
  7. 7. Stanza 2 Beware the Jabberwock, my son! The jaws that bite, the claws that catch! Beware the Jubjub bird, and shun The frumious Bandersnatch! The second stanza of Jabberwocky is a warning from a person who is presumably the father of the hero of the story. He warns his son to be careful of and to avoid three different monsters; the Jabberwock, the Jubjub bird and the Bandersnatch. The third of these monsters is described as 'frumious', a word which Lewis Carroll said means 'fuming and furious'. Stanza 3 He took his vorpal sword in hand: Long time the manxome foe he sought— So rested he by the Tumtum tree, And stood awhile in thought. The third stanza the hero takes his weapon, heads off, and spends a good long time trying to find these evil creatures. When the hero has been seeking his foes for a while, and is now taking a break.So he rests by the tree, and loses himself thinking for a little while. Stanza 4 And as in uffish thought he stood, The Jabberwock, with eyes of flame, Came whiffling through the tulgey wood, And burbled as it came!
  8. 8. The forth stanza tell about characteristic of Jabberwocky. "eyes of flame." This makes him seem like a dragon. When Jabberwocky came, it came whiffling. Whistling can also mean "to move very fast”. Stanza 5 One, two! One, two! and through and through The vorpal blade went snicker-snack! He left it dead, and with its head He went galumphing back. The Fifth stanza tell about the fight between the hero and Jabberwocky. It’s like a one-two punch but with a sword. We can picture the hero, here, swinging his sword quickly back and forth. The "through and through" part tells us that the blade is in fact making contact with the Jabberwocky and finally, the hero managed to kill Jabberwocky with beheaded. Stanza 6 "And hast thou slain the Jabberwock? Come to my arms, my beamish boy! O frabjous day! Callooh! Callay!" He chortled in his joy. The sixth stanza tell the hero back to home after kill Jabberwocky and his parent then asks the son to give him a hug and they celebrate the victory. Stanza 7 Twas brillig, and the slithy toves Did gyre and gimble in the wabe; All mimsy were the borogoves, And the mome raths outgrabe.
  9. 9. The seventh stanza, It’s the exact same difficult, whimsical stanza as the first. It tells that everything after this incident return back to normal. The repetition of the first stanza would seem to indicate that all thing in Wonderland have gone back to the way they were before the Jabberwocky came. V. Sound Devices Rhyme scheme 'Jabberwocky' consists of seven quatrains, using both ballad rhyme schemes, 'ABAB' and 'ABCB'. Instead of alternating four-stress and three-stress lines, four of the stanzas use the 'ABAB' rhyme scheme, while three use 'ABCB'. VI. Figure of speech The Jabberwock, with eyes of flame, Came whiffling through the tulgey wood, And burbled as it came! The poem has a metaphor in it. There actually is not very much figurative language if you just read it directly. VII. Symbolism and Imagery Symbolism Dragon Most of the poem describe about the Jabberwocky. It symbolizes about something violence that beat by the hero. Jabberwocky here also symbolizes about fantasy. We know that the poem is full of the fantasy or unreal. Imagery Scary beast
  10. 10. "Beware the Jabberwock, my son! The jaws that bite, the claws that catch! Beware the Jubjub bird, and shun The frumious Bandersnatch!" When we read the poem, we will imagine the scary beast. Bravery We can see the bravery of the boy as a hero to find the Jabberwocky and then he beat it. VIII. Tone One important element to determine the poems tone is the storyline. Overall, the poem is about a battle between a boy and a vicious monster called the Jabberwocky. The reader could interpret this storyline as more of an epic battle or a playful battle. For example, a serious tone could be shown in the fifth stanza when it describes the battle between the boy and the Jabberwocky. In line nineteen and twenty it states “He left it dead, and with its head/He went galumphing back.” The fact that the boy decapitated the Jabberwocky sets a serious tone rather than playful. A playful tone would only state that the boy killed the monster; decapitation is gruesome. On the other hand, the storyline could interpret a playful tone since this is a typical fairytale story such as “Jack and the Beanstalk” where Jack kills the giant. Although most fairytales in the early 19th century were made for adults; this poem was written in 1872. The famous Brother’s Grimm had already rewritten fairytales and folktales that were more fitted for children. Thus, the “Jabberwocky” is a poem that is most likely intended for children. IX. Point of view The story is told by a narrator, but in the second and sixth stanza the narration is interrupted by a literal speech by the father. About who the speaker of the poem is, it is a little bit confusing, because we know, the poem was found on the page of the book by
  11. 11. Allice in the Trough Looking-Glass Novel, but so far, we can see the point of view of narrator is a third speaker in the poem. X. Theme Heroic quest This theme is the heroic quest, because, we know in the poem, a boy as a hero doing a quest to fight the Jabberwock. Finally, he found the Jabberwock and he beat it. One, two! One, two! And through and through The vorpal blade went snicker-snack! He left it dead, and with its head He went galumphing back Good versus Evil In this poem "Good vs. Evil" is linked with the violence of the Jabberwocky." When good (our hero) and evil (the Jabberwock) meet in this story, violence ensues. "Jabberwocky" pits the individual (one lone man) against a mythical beast. Since this beast doesn't exist in our world, it becomes something bigger, a kind of metaphor for Evil with a capital E. If it were simply human vs. human – say, white knight vs. black knight – you could draw the same conclusions, but perhaps the outcome would be less surprising. One small man triumphing over a big huge beast is an order of magnitude unto itself.
  12. 12. XI. References http://www.alice-in-wonderland.net/jabberwocky.html/ http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20061029185856AAtbPpi Jabberwocky. (2013, November 2). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 04:41, November 10, 2013, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Jabberwocky&oldid=579897560 Shmoop Editorial Team. (November 11, 2008).Jabberwocky Speaker. Retrieved November 11, 2013, from http://www.shmoop.com/jabberwocky/speaker.html

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