Investments in Rural America: Where Are the Foundations?

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Investments in Rural America: Where Are the Foundations?

  1. 1. Investments in Rural America:Where are the Foundations?Jim “JR” Richardson, NationalRural Funders CollaborativeDavid R. Dangler, National Alliance forRural Policy NetworkJessica HiemenzNational Consumer Law CenterApril 25, 2012
  2. 2. Presenter – David R. Dangler• Heads up NeighborWorks® America’s Rural Initiative. Over100 of the 230 organizations that comprise theNeighborWorks® network serve rural communities –delivering essential services and investments inhomeownership, rental housing, community revitalization,economic development and quality manufactured housing.• NeighborWorks® organizations are active in 1,268 ruraland mixed rural counties in 46 states plus Puerto Rico.Annually these organizations directly invest over $1.5billion in their communities through housing and economicdevelopment.• Mr. Dangler is also a founding member of the NationalAlliance for Rural Policy (NARP) and is a member ofthe National Rural Housing Coalition’s board of directors.
  3. 3. Presenter – James A. Richardson• For the last ten years, Jim has served as thefounding Executive Director of the National RuralFunders Collaborative, a ten-year initiativecollaboration of private foundations to supportrural community development initiatives inmarginalized, persistently poor areas of thecountry, especially communities and organizationsof color and service low-wealth communities.• Jim currently lives in Dallas and regular consultsthroughout the U.S. in areas of communityeconomic development and rural developmentphilanthropy.
  4. 4. Working together to promote a vibrant rural America.Experience Works · First Nations Development Institute · Housing Assistance Council · Indian Country Conservancy ·National Association of Community Health Centers · National Association of Development Organizations Research Foundation·National Consumer Law Center · National Trust for Historic Preservation · National Rural Health Association ·National Youth Leadership Network · NeighborWorks America · Save the Children · United Farm Workers FoundationContact: Emily Blejwas, Network Coordinatoreblejwas@gmail.com
  5. 5. National RURAL FUNDERS CollaborativeA Philanthropic Initiative SupportingA Philanthropic Initiative SupportingA Philanthropic Initiative SupportingA Philanthropic Initiative SupportingRural Community TransformationRural Community TransformationRural Community TransformationRural Community Transformation5
  6. 6. 6National RURAL FUNDERSCollaborativeOur VisionNRFC envisions a transformation of rural regions facingpersistent poverty from communities in which historicbarriers of race and class reinforce and deepen historicdisinvestment and disenfranchisement to more vibrantand inclusive communities in which all who live and worktherein can aspire toreceive fair wages and benefits for their labor,provide basic necessities and a quality of living for their families andenjoy full rights and privileges of a civil society in which all can lead.
  7. 7. 7National RURAL FUNDERSCollaborativePhase I: 2000Phase I: 2000Phase I: 2000Phase I: 2000 ---- 2006200620062006Reversing Persistent Poverty & Transforming RuralReversing Persistent Poverty & Transforming RuralReversing Persistent Poverty & Transforming RuralReversing Persistent Poverty & Transforming RuralCommunities through:Communities through:Communities through:Communities through:Build Community WealthBuild Community WealthBuild Community WealthBuild Community WealthIncrease Civic Participation/ Inclusive LeadershipIncrease Civic Participation/ Inclusive LeadershipIncrease Civic Participation/ Inclusive LeadershipIncrease Civic Participation/ Inclusive LeadershipAchieve Greater Family SelfAchieve Greater Family SelfAchieve Greater Family SelfAchieve Greater Family Self----sufficiencysufficiencysufficiencysufficiency
  8. 8. 4/26/2012 8 NRFC SEA-Change 1.02
  9. 9. 9National RURAL FUNDERSCollaborativeTheory of ChangeRural Poverty persists due to decades/generations of:Environmental and economic disinvestmentEnvironmental and economic disinvestmentEnvironmental and economic disinvestmentEnvironmental and economic disinvestmentCultural and social IsolationCultural and social IsolationCultural and social IsolationCultural and social IsolationBarriers of race and classBarriers of race and classBarriers of race and classBarriers of race and class
  10. 10. 10National RURAL FUNDERSCollaborativeTheory of ChangeReversing Persistent Poverty, i.e., Rural Transformation, requiresthree interrelated outcome strategies for lasting, measurable change:Build Community WealthBuild Community WealthBuild Community WealthBuild Community WealthIncrease Civic Participation/ Inclusive LeadershipIncrease Civic Participation/ Inclusive LeadershipIncrease Civic Participation/ Inclusive LeadershipIncrease Civic Participation/ Inclusive LeadershipAchieve Greater Family SelfAchieve Greater Family SelfAchieve Greater Family SelfAchieve Greater Family Self----sufficiencysufficiencysufficiencysufficiency
  11. 11. 11National RURAL FUNDERSCollaborativeWealth Creation + Civic Participation =Family Self-SufficiencyCivic Participation/LeadershipWealthCreation
  12. 12. 12National RURAL FUNDERSCollaborativeAlaska Native Tribal Health ConsortiumVillage Based Health ProvidersCreating Wealth:Creating Wealth:Creating Wealth:Creating Wealth: Medicaid Funded Career Ladder to IncreaseEconomic OpportunityLeadership Transformation:Leadership Transformation:Leadership Transformation:Leadership Transformation: Identification/Training ofVillage-Based Health WorkersFamily SelfFamily SelfFamily SelfFamily Self----Sufficiency:Sufficiency:Sufficiency:Sufficiency: Greater, More Affordable Access to Healthcare &Community Well-being
  13. 13. 13National RURAL FUNDERSCollaborativeSouth Carolina Association of Community Development CorpsCommunity DevelopmentCreating Wealth:Creating Wealth:Creating Wealth:Creating Wealth: Small Business Development/Affordable Housingthrough Nurture/Expansion of Community Development CorporationsCivic Participation/Leadership:Civic Participation/Leadership:Civic Participation/Leadership:Civic Participation/Leadership: Grassroots Policy Advocacy &Leadership DevelopmentFamily SelfFamily SelfFamily SelfFamily Self----Sufficiency:Sufficiency:Sufficiency:Sufficiency: Increased NP sector jobs & Community-basedservices
  14. 14. 14National RURAL FUNDERSCollaborativeAppalachian Ohio Regional Investment CoalitionCultural Heritage Tourism/EntrepreneurshipCreating Wealth:Creating Wealth:Creating Wealth:Creating Wealth: Development/Networking of Community Assets –-- Birding Trails, Heritage Fesitvals, CraftsCivic Participation/Leadership:Civic Participation/Leadership:Civic Participation/Leadership:Civic Participation/Leadership: Identification/Facilitation ofEmerging EntrepreneursFamily SelfFamily SelfFamily SelfFamily Self----Sufficiency:Sufficiency:Sufficiency:Sufficiency: Increased Employment/Stronger Local Economies-- Livable Wage Jobs, Stronger Support Networks & Services
  15. 15. 15National RURAL FUNDERSCollaborativeRural Livelihoods New Mexico CollaborativeRevitalization of Culturally-based LivelihoodsCreating Wealth:Creating Wealth:Creating Wealth:Creating Wealth: Culturally Based Opportunities forLow-wealth FamiliesCivic Participation/Leadership:Civic Participation/Leadership:Civic Participation/Leadership:Civic Participation/Leadership: Skills CompetenceLeads to Greater Civic ParticipationFamily SelfFamily SelfFamily SelfFamily Self----Sufficiency:Sufficiency:Sufficiency:Sufficiency: Revitalized Local Economies throughEntrepreneurship
  16. 16. 16National RURAL FUNDERSCollaborativePhase II: 2006Phase II: 2006Phase II: 2006Phase II: 2006 ---- 2011201120112011Zeroing In:Zeroing In:Zeroing In:Zeroing In:On Race, Class & PowerOn Race, Class & PowerOn Race, Class & PowerOn Race, Class & Power –––– Regions where Race & Poverty areRegions where Race & Poverty areRegions where Race & Poverty areRegions where Race & Poverty areconcentrated and overlapconcentrated and overlapconcentrated and overlapconcentrated and overlapOn Alternative EconomiesOn Alternative EconomiesOn Alternative EconomiesOn Alternative Economies –––– Regional Economic Strategies built onRegional Economic Strategies built onRegional Economic Strategies built onRegional Economic Strategies built onCommunity Assets and led by LowCommunity Assets and led by LowCommunity Assets and led by LowCommunity Assets and led by Low----Wealth Leaders, especially of colorWealth Leaders, especially of colorWealth Leaders, especially of colorWealth Leaders, especially of color
  17. 17. 17National RURAL FUNDERSCollaborativeHow to Achieve Greater Impact and Leverage:NRFC’s Fourfold Theory of ChangeIncrease family and community self-sufficiency through creatinggreater opportunity through “alternative rural economies.”Achieve equity in transforming rural communities through“narrowing the gap” in disparities of race, class, and power.Build community investment and self-determination throughsupporting community-controlled philanthropic models.Effect long-term, lasting change through grassroots advocacy andcommunity-based policy networks.
  18. 18. 18National RURAL FUNDERSCollaborativeRevised Mission StatementNRFC seeks to build a movement of support andadvocacy for alternative rural economies based oncommunity assets of culture, land and human capitaland grounded in relationships and values of equityand justice.
  19. 19. 19Building a Movement for RuralTransformation
  20. 20. 20National RURAL FUNDERSCollaborativeNew FocusNRFC will focus its work where concentrations of poverty and coloroverlap:Mid South/Delta African American - Farmers/FishersNorthern Great Plains Native American Tribes - Land/CultureCalifornia Latino/Indigenous – Farmworkers/Entrepreneurs
  21. 21. 21National RURAL FUNDERSCollaborativeMid Southmarket umbrella.org/ Mississippi Association of Coopsmarket umbrella.org/ Mississippi Association of Coopsmarket umbrella.org/ Mississippi Association of Coopsmarket umbrella.org/ Mississippi Association of CoopsPublic market (farmers market) based strategy to develop “MarketShares” variation of giving circles to support stability and innovationof small producers in the market, paired with a focus onstrengthening and developing place and number of small, minorityfarmers (primarily African American) in regional markets.
  22. 22. 22National RURAL FUNDERSCollaborativeNorthern PlainsIndian Land Tenure Foundation/Native American CDCIndian Land Tenure Foundation/Native American CDCIndian Land Tenure Foundation/Native American CDCIndian Land Tenure Foundation/Native American CDCStrategy for working with landed Indian tribes in Montana andN. Dakota to translate cultural understanding of tribal sovereigntyto “economic sovereignty” as approach for building on land andcultural assets of Native American community to devise sustainablestrategies for rural transformation and new vision of regionalcompetitive advantage.
  23. 23. 23National RURAL FUNDERSCollaborativeCalifornia/WestSalinas &Salinas &Salinas &Salinas & PajaroPajaroPajaroPajaro Valley Collaborative/Valley Collaborative/Valley Collaborative/Valley Collaborative/ Rai$ingRai$ingRai$ingRai$ing ChangeChangeChangeChangeA multi-faceted regional approach to restructure the local Ag-basedeconomy through creating asset-building, entrepreneurial small-business and small-farm opportunities for Latino farmworkers in theSalinas and Pajaro Valleys in northern Monterey County and throughincreasing opportunities for civic participation and businessdevelopment among non-Spanish speaking indigenous (i.e., Oaxacan)residents in southern Monterey County.
  24. 24. 24National RURAL FUNDERSCollaborativeLessons LearnedLessons LearnedLessons LearnedLessons Learned&&&&Legacies for FutureLegacies for FutureLegacies for FutureLegacies for FutureCollaborationCollaborationCollaborationCollaboration
  25. 25. 25National RURAL FUNDERSCollaborativeStrengthening Practice through PerformanceBuild Collaborative Capital for Working TogetherFund “Strategic Opportunities” for Regional ChangeDefine Outcome Targets/ Milestones for SuccessDocument Best Practices & Peer Learning
  26. 26. 26National RURAL FUNDERSCollaborativeExpanding Philanthropy & InvestmentFind Alternative Models for Regional Philanthropy &InvestmentFoster Engaged Funder-Practitioner PartnershipsForm Public - Private Partnerships for Greater LeverageConvene National & Regional Funders to Work Together
  27. 27. 27National RURAL FUNDERSCollaborativeAdvancing Policy at the Grassroots& in the TreetopsBuild Local & Regional Capacity for Policy FramingFoster Regional Networks for Greater InfluenceConnect Public Agencies to Regional InitiativesBuild National Agenda for Regional Responsiveness
  28. 28. 28National RURAL FUNDERSCollaborativeAn UnfinishedAn UnfinishedAn UnfinishedAn UnfinishedAgendaAgendaAgendaAgenda&&&&Future FundingFuture FundingFuture FundingFuture FundingOpportunitiesOpportunitiesOpportunitiesOpportunities
  29. 29. 29National RURAL FUNDERSCollaborativeThe Unfinished Agenda:Reframing the Rural Value PropositionOriginal Framing = Fairness, i.e., Rural Communities & Regionsnot getting their “fair share” of fundingCurrent Framing w/i Philanthropy = Impact with a bias towardurban where greater number can be reached throughstrategies in concentrated geographiesImplications for Reframing Rural Funding = Interdependency ofrural and urban within Regions of Influence
  30. 30. 30National RURAL FUNDERSCollaborativeFuture Funding Opportunities:Identifying Critical “Regions of Influence” thatcut across Urban and Rural LandscapesEducational Attainment = Community Colleges as primaryvehicle for building a competitive workforce and an engagedpost-secondary populationFood Security = Intersection of Grow Local, Buy Local withhealthier communitiesCivic Participation/Citizenship = Increasing the Diversity ofLeadership within our communities and regions (immigration)
  31. 31. 31National RURAL FUNDERSCollaborativeFuture Funding Strategies:Developing Regional Partnerships that combine“Regions of Interest” with “Regions of Influence”Geographically-related Funders = primarily CommunityFoundations and Family Foundations with concentratedurban/rural serving areasAffinity Groups = associations of funders and otherorganizations with shared interests and complimentary areasof influenceLeveraging Area Resources = venture/leadership from areafunders, infrastructure/programmatic direction fromnonprofits, technical/strategic support from public sector
  32. 32. 32National RURAL FUNDERSCollaborativeFuture Funding Strategies:Roles & RelationshipsPractice = nonprofit community must identify the compellingstrategies and models to capture and join “regions ofinfluence” with “regions of interest”Philanthropy = area funders must be challenged andincentivized to provide seed, strategic and sustaining capitalPolicy = governmental and jurisdictional agencies must beencouraged to find creative, administrative ways ofovercoming barriers and multiplying/accelerating results

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