Startup Culture: Value Creation in the Academic Library

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In order to create new and better experiences for our students, we created a student group of Developers/Designers to work on projects. The group is modeled as a startup, working with great freedom.

The presentation also defines a logic of how disruptive technologies create perceptual changes, that in turn, create new expectations for users.

Presented at Loyola Marymount University, April 12, 2011

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Startup Culture: Value Creation in the Academic Library

  1. 1. Startup CultureValue Creation in the Academic Library Kevin Rundblad UX and Social Technology Strategist UCLA LibraryPresented at Loyola Marymount University, April 12, 2011
  2. 2. Thesis:Great new experiences do not comefrom old processes and structures...
  3. 3. ...They come from new culturesof collaboration, and are incentivizedaround concepts of effectiveness andembedded decision-making.
  4. 4. We were searching
  5. 5. For a window intostudent experience
  6. 6. How they work
  7. 7. Apps they use
  8. 8. Interactions they like
  9. 9. To engage our primedemographic
  10. 10. And nurture abundantstudent talent
  11. 11. User studies generallyprovide static information
  12. 12. “If you truly want to understandcustomers wants and needs,you need to remove the distancebetween you and them.” Jorge Barba Digital Strategist, Blu Maya
  13. 13. Working “with them”is only part of story
  14. 14. Working “like them”is even more important
  15. 15. Hierarchical Flowing, person to personTime/Process-driven 9-5 Work anytime/anywhereCommittees, Meetings Independent/casual meetupsWork at desk Work on Laptop Us Students Graphics: http://www.game-changer.net/2010/11/19/radical-management-it-isn%E2%80%99t-just-w-l-gore/
  16. 16. Hierarchical Flowing, person to personTime-driven 9-5 Work anytime/anywhereCommittees, Meetings Independent/casual meetupsWork at desk Work on Laptop Being “effective” is only rule = Grade Us Students Graphics: http://www.game-changer.net/2010/11/19/radical-management-it-isn%E2%80%99t-just-w-l-gore/
  17. 17. Hierarchical Flowing, person to personTime/Process-driven 9-5 Work anytime/anywhereCommittees, Meetings Independent/casual meetupsWork at desk Work on Laptop Being “effective” is only rule = Grade Us Students Graphics: http://www.game-changer.net/2010/11/19/radical-management-it-isn%E2%80%99t-just-w-l-gore/
  18. 18. Can we createexperiences for
  19. 19. With thiswork structure
  20. 20. Students naturallywork like startup orgs
  21. 21. Peer-2-Peer mode,Impromptu, and selforganizing
  22. 22. They have 1 Rule
  23. 23. Be Effective
  24. 24. NetflixFreedom & ResponsibilityCulture From: http://www.slideshare.net/reed2001/culture-1798664
  25. 25. Netflix1. Talent density2. Employee freedom From: http://www.slideshare.net/reed2001/culture-1798664
  26. 26. “There is no clothing policy atNetflix, but no one has come towork naked lately.” Patty McCord, 2004 From Reed Hastings, “Freedom & Responsibility Culture” From: http://www.slideshare.net/reed2001/culture-1798664
  27. 27. Be Effective Vs.Rule-driven
  28. 28. 5 words that covermany Netflix policies
  29. 29. “Act in Netflix‟s bestinterests” From: http://www.slideshare.net/reed2001/culture-1798664
  30. 30. Innovation comes froma culture that allowsembedded decisions
  31. 31. “The Incredible FreedomOf a Facebook Engineer” http://read.bi/hm7Qos
  32. 32. “Engineers decide what they want towork on. Product managers goaround and lobby them trying toconvince them to work on their project.. http://read.bi/hm7Qos
  33. 33. ...then engineers talk to theirmanagers and say „Id like towork on x this week.‟” http://read.bi/hm7Qos
  34. 34. Vivek Wadhwa commentary onthe past recipe for economic growthand innovation Vivek Wadhwa (busy guy!) - Director of Research, Duke University - Sr. Research Associate, Harvard Law - Visiting Scholar, School of Information UC Berkeley - Writer, TechCrunch & Bloomberg BusinessWeek - Entrepreneur
  35. 35. “Build a magnificent technology parknext to a research university; A Better Formula for Economic Growth: Connecting Smart Risk Takers http://wadhwa.com/2010/11/27/554/
  36. 36. ...provide incentives for chosenbusinesses to locate there;add some venture capital; A Better Formula for Economic Growth: Connecting Smart Risk Takers http://wadhwa.com/2010/11/27/554/
  37. 37. ...Hundreds of regions all over theworld have spent billions on suchefforts. A Better Formula for Economic Growth: Connecting Smart Risk Takers http://wadhwa.com/2010/11/27/554/
  38. 38. ...practically all have failed.” A Better Formula for Economic Growth: Connecting Smart Risk Takers http://wadhwa.com/2010/11/27/554/
  39. 39. Why?
  40. 40. Because the emphasisIs not on what mattersmost...
  41. 41. People &a culture of risk-taking
  42. 42. Human knowledgenetworks, trump physical& monetary assets
  43. 43. Physical assets arelike location valuein film
  44. 44. They make you believea story is happening.But it is just the backdrop.
  45. 45. Buildings on campusmay represent billionsin investment
  46. 46. But human networksand knowledge capitalare the real value engines
  47. 47. Why does Silicon Valleyproduce so manynew companies?
  48. 48. Networks of talented,unencumbered people(and coffee shops)
  49. 49. IT Startup Needs (physical):Laptops, mobile devices, software,& connection
  50. 50. IT Startup Needs (cultural):P2P & self organizing, interest-driven,Hacker-culture, small teams,and everything starts with UXand disruptive ideas.
  51. 51. IT Startup Needs (talent):Developers/Designers withentrepreneurial passions.Creative, fun, engaging, andobsessively driven.
  52. 52. 1 rule: Effectiveness
  53. 53. Value creation beginswith user experience
  54. 54. “Experience is theProduct” Peter Merholz Principle, Adaptive Path
  55. 55. How do we buildhigh value experiences?
  56. 56. Think in disruptive terms
  57. 57. A disruptive experience is onethat radically impacts a market,or creates entirely new markets
  58. 58. Think „hacker culture‟What happened to Yahoo (Paul Graham) http://www.paulgraham.com/yahoo.html
  59. 59. “Microsoft (back in the day),Google, and Facebook have allhad hacker-centric cultures.” Paul Graham Y Combinator
  60. 60. WikipediaGoogleTwitter Disruptive ExperiencesiPhoneFacebookPandoraDropbox
  61. 61. WikipediaGoogleTwitter Why Disruptive?iPhoneFacebook They changed ourPandora expectations of anDropbox experience/interaction
  62. 62. WikipediaGoogleTwitter Changing PerceptioniPhoneFacebook We do not perceivePandora interfaces the sameDropbox way over time.
  63. 63. 1975http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Pong.png
  64. 64. 1983 Apple Lisahttp://toastytech.com/guis/biglisa.jpg
  65. 65. 1984 Apple Macintoshhttp://toastytech.com/guis/bigmac1.gif
  66. 66. 1985Commodore Amiga 1000 http://toastytech.com/guis/wb_10.gif
  67. 67. 1985 Microsoft Windowshttp://toastytech.com/guis/bigw101.gif
  68. 68. 1987 Apple Macintosh Ihttp://toastytech.com/guis/bigmacii.gif
  69. 69. 1987Microsoft Windows 2.03http://toastytech.com/guis/bigw203.gif
  70. 70. 1990Commodore Amiga 1000http://toastytech.com/guis/wb_20.gif
  71. 71. 1990 Microsoft Windows 3.00http://toastytech.com/guis/win30progman.gif
  72. 72. 1992/93 Microsoft Windows 3.1& NT http://toastytech.com/guis/nt351progman2.gif
  73. 73. 1995 Microsoft Windows 95http://toastytech.com/guis/win95statup.gif
  74. 74. A few Companiescontrolled UX incomputing prior to 1995
  75. 75. Disruption happenedSlowly (not as slow as in thehistory of agricultural, industrialand information economies)
  76. 76. Then...the rise of the“connected economy” Breaking Free From the Iron Cage: Business in the Connected Age : peterme.com http://bit.ly/euWjkg
  77. 77. Browsers + Markup (html)made for a proliferationof new opportunities
  78. 78. Changes in experiences(new services/interfaces)rapidly increased
  79. 79. Disruptive experienceshave accelerated faster
  80. 80. Which is impactingour user‟s expectations
  81. 81. We have changed.Our Users have changed.
  82. 82. Experiences are notstatic events
  83. 83. We change every daydue to shifting context
  84. 84. Disruptive experiencesReframe our expectations
  85. 85. And in turn, disruptOur habits
  86. 86. Do you try to pinch your laptop screen?How do you get your news? Twitter?Watching Netflix streaming?
  87. 87. Expectationsare what drive the needto innovate
  88. 88. High Value UXis aboutdisrupting the expected
  89. 89. Amazon disrupts theexperience in the deliveryof product
  90. 90. Promises 5-7 dayDelivery
  91. 91. Usually exceeds thiswith 3 day delivery
  92. 92. Our expectations arenot the same as in1996
  93. 93. The shift from directorybrowsing to interactive apps 1996 Waybackmachine.org
  94. 94. The shift from directorybrowsing to interactive apps 1996 Waybackmachine.org
  95. 95. Web Site Directory 1996 Waybackmachine.org
  96. 96. Shrinking 1997Waybackmachine.org
  97. 97. Shrinking... 2001 Waybackmachine.org
  98. 98. Almost gone... 2003 Waybackmachine.org
  99. 99. App Focus 2006 Waybackmachine.org
  100. 100. App Focus News 2006 Waybackmachine.org
  101. 101. Apps 2010 Waybackmachine.org
  102. 102. MediaApps 2010 Waybackmachine.org
  103. 103. MediaApps News 2010 Waybackmachine.org
  104. 104. Experiences arenow defined at web speed
  105. 105. User expectationsare elevated constantlyby new services
  106. 106. But org structureshave stayed the same
  107. 107. New experiences arebuilt from new thinking
  108. 108. UX goes all the wayback to how we work
  109. 109. “If you get the culture rightthen most of the other stuffwill naturally happen out of it.” Tony Hsieh CEO, Zappos
  110. 110. Wrap-upPerceptual experiences change over timeHigh value experience are disruptiveKnow & Learn from users (startup group)Get culture right, everything follows
  111. 111. “Create the conditions under which people can flourish” Sir Ken RobinsonQuestions/ConversationKevin RundbladUX and Social Technology StrategistUCLA Libraryhttp://about.me/rundbladPresented at Loyola Marymount University, April 12, 2011

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