WHO IS RESPONSIBLE FOR CHILD LABOUR?
CHILD LABOUR MEANS: WORK FOR CHILDREN THAT HARMS THEM OR EXPLOITS THEM IN SOME WAY ( PHYSICALLY,MENTALLY OR MORALLY )
 
 
 
 
WHO WILL STOP THIS BARBARIAN ACT?
 
<ul><li>An estimated 158 million children aged 5-14 are engaged in child labour - one in six children in the world. Millio...
<ul><li>In Sub-Saharan Africa around one in three children are engaged in child labour, representing 69 million children. ...
<ul><li>In South Asia, another 44 million are engaged in child labour.  </li></ul><ul><li>The latest national estimates fo...
 
<ul><li>A child is defined as a person under the age of 18.  Child labour is work undertaken by a child that is harmful to...
<ul><li>Children living in the poorest households and in rural areas are most likely to be engaged in child labour. Those ...
       
<ul><li>Why do Children Work? </li></ul><ul><li>There are many reasons why children enter into work.   For some children i...
<ul><li>Working to pay off the money their parents owe to their boss  </li></ul><ul><li>They or their family members have ...
WHAT IS UNICEF DOING TO HELP CHILD LABOURERS?
UNICEF SUPPORTS A NUMBER OF CHILD PROJECTS WHICH REACH OUT TO HELP LABOURERS.THESE INCLUDE:
A PROJECT HELPING TO EDUCATE URBAN CHILD LABOURERS IN BANGLADESH.
<ul><li>Demobilising child soldiers in Angola, Burundi, Liberia and the Democratic Republic of Congo  (e.g. taking them ou...
<ul><li>Carrying fruit for sale at the central market in Dili, Timor Leste © UNICEF/HQ00-0041/Jim Holmes </li></ul><ul>...
<ul><li>Avenir de l-Enfant in Senegal  - A children's charity in Dakar.  They talk to families and tourists about sexual e...
<ul><li>Bal Adhikar Pariyojana (Child Rights Initiative - North India   </li></ul>
<ul><li>Free Primary Education in Kenya  - UNICEF committed funds to the Kenyan government initiative of providing free pr...
<ul><li>MELPWOOD (Mediation for the Less Privileged and Women's Development - Nigeria)  - An organisation helping orphans ...
<ul><li>Visayan Forum (Manila, Philippines)  - About five million people arrive in Manila each year searching for work and...
 
 
 
 
 
DO ANYBODY HELP US, IF YES…WHEN????????
PRESENTED BY RUKHSANA TARIQ
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Who is responsible for child labour

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Who is responsible for child labour

  1. 1. WHO IS RESPONSIBLE FOR CHILD LABOUR?
  2. 2. CHILD LABOUR MEANS: WORK FOR CHILDREN THAT HARMS THEM OR EXPLOITS THEM IN SOME WAY ( PHYSICALLY,MENTALLY OR MORALLY )
  3. 7. WHO WILL STOP THIS BARBARIAN ACT?
  4. 9. <ul><li>An estimated 158 million children aged 5-14 are engaged in child labour - one in six children in the world. Millions of children are engaged in hazardous situations or conditions, such as working in mines, working with chemicals and pesticides in agriculture or working with dangerous machinery. They are everywhere but invisible, toiling as domestic servants in homes, labouring behind the walls of workshops, hidden from view in plantations. </li></ul>
  5. 10. <ul><li>In Sub-Saharan Africa around one in three children are engaged in child labour, representing 69 million children. </li></ul>
  6. 11. <ul><li>In South Asia, another 44 million are engaged in child labour. </li></ul><ul><li>The latest national estimates for this indicator are reported in Table 9 (Child Protection) of UNICEF's annual publication The State of the World's Children. </li></ul>
  7. 13. <ul><li>A child is defined as a person under the age of 18.  Child labour is work undertaken by a child that is harmful to them in some way.  The labour could be harmful by making them sick, stopping them from getting an education or damaging them emotionally.  </li></ul>
  8. 14. <ul><li>Children living in the poorest households and in rural areas are most likely to be engaged in child labour. Those burdened with household chores are overwhelmingly girls. Millions of girls who work as domestic servants are especially vulnerable to exploitation and abuse. </li></ul>
  9. 15.        
  10. 16. <ul><li>Why do Children Work? </li></ul><ul><li>There are many reasons why children enter into work.   For some children it is a choice but for others it is not.  The reasons include: </li></ul><ul><li>Being born into a poor family and working to earn money to help support them </li></ul><ul><li>Getting work experience in order to be able to get a better job in the future </li></ul><ul><li>In order to get food or to have somewhere to live </li></ul><ul><li>To earn pocket money to purchase things they want </li></ul><ul><li>Being the head of their household (there are a lot of child-headed households in Africa because of HIV/AIDS ) </li></ul>
  11. 17. <ul><li>Working to pay off the money their parents owe to their boss </li></ul><ul><li>They or their family members have been threatened with harm if they do not work </li></ul><ul><li>Being taken against their will and used by or sold to corrupt people </li></ul><ul><li>Being offered jobs and tricked into accepting a job without understanding what is involved - often ending up in places which are unfamiliar </li></ul><ul><li>There is an acceptable age in the community in which they live at which you are expected to work (this is often at an earlier age for girls). </li></ul>
  12. 18. WHAT IS UNICEF DOING TO HELP CHILD LABOURERS?
  13. 19. UNICEF SUPPORTS A NUMBER OF CHILD PROJECTS WHICH REACH OUT TO HELP LABOURERS.THESE INCLUDE:
  14. 20. A PROJECT HELPING TO EDUCATE URBAN CHILD LABOURERS IN BANGLADESH.
  15. 21. <ul><li>Demobilising child soldiers in Angola, Burundi, Liberia and the Democratic Republic of Congo (e.g. taking them out of armed groups) - UNICEF works in these countries to help children who have been used by armed groups escape their situation and get back into their communities </li></ul>
  16. 22. <ul><li>Carrying fruit for sale at the central market in Dili, Timor Leste © UNICEF/HQ00-0041/Jim Holmes </li></ul><ul><li>Ndhime Per Femijet (Help the Children - Albania) - An NGO (Non-Government Organisation) called Help the Children works with sexually abused children, a number of whom have been trafficked to Greece.  </li></ul>
  17. 23. <ul><li>Avenir de l-Enfant in Senegal - A children's charity in Dakar.  They talk to families and tourists about sexual exploitation, raising awareness of the risks to children and their families </li></ul>
  18. 24. <ul><li>Bal Adhikar Pariyojana (Child Rights Initiative - North India </li></ul>
  19. 25. <ul><li>Free Primary Education in Kenya - UNICEF committed funds to the Kenyan government initiative of providing free primary school education.  This was especially important for children orphaned by HIV/AIDS who couldn't afford schooling costs. </li></ul>
  20. 26. <ul><li>MELPWOOD (Mediation for the Less Privileged and Women's Development - Nigeria) - An organisation helping orphans and other vulnerable children teaching them vocational skills so they can make a living and avoid further exploitation.  The organisation also helps fund schooling for the 55 children taking part in the project. </li></ul>
  21. 27. <ul><li>Visayan Forum (Manila, Philippines) - About five million people arrive in Manila each year searching for work and a better future.  Visayan Forum provides help and advice to the children arriving in Manila's port and has set up a halfway house there, operating 24 hours a day.  It also works to persuade authorities to improve laws on child protection and has provided legal advice to young people.  UNICEF provides technical assistance to their campaigning alliance. </li></ul>
  22. 33. DO ANYBODY HELP US, IF YES…WHEN????????
  23. 34. PRESENTED BY RUKHSANA TARIQ

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