MGT 420INTRODUCTION TO  MANAGEMENT    CHAPTER 1     Week 1
Outlines of the chapter1.   What is management2.   Levels of management3.   Managerial skills4.   Managerial roles5.   Pro...
What is Management?• The Classic Definition       – The art of getting things done through people.                        ...
The Organization• An Organization       – A group of individuals who work together toward         common goals.• What do a...
Managers• Managers are the people who plan, organize, lead, and  control the activities of the organization so that its go...
Figure 1.1                The Management Process© 2007 Thomson/South-                                               1–6Wes...
Planning And Organizing• Planning       – Setting goals and defining the actions necessary to         achieve those goals....
Leading• Leadership       – The capacity to direct and motivate the members of         work groups toward the accomplishme...
Controlling• Monitoring the performance of the organization and  its progress in implementing strategic and  operational p...
Measuring managerial performance• Effectiveness       – Achieved when the organization pursues appropriate         goals. ...
Figure 1–5                An Overall Framework of Management© 2007 Thomson/South-                                         ...
Scope of Responsibility:        Functional and General Managers     A functional manager is      A functional manager is  ...
Managers responsibility• Functional managers;  responsible for work groups that are segmented  according to function. E.g;...
Figure 1.3                Managerial Levels (managers at different level)© 2007 Thomson/South-                            ...
Managers at different level• First line managers  Eg. production supervisor. The objective is to ensure that the  products...
Management Skills• Technical Skills       – The ability to utilize the knowledge of tools,         techniques, and procedu...
Figure 1.4      Skills Needed at Different Levels of Management© 2007 Thomson/South-                                      ...
Management skills• Technical skills tend to be most important for first  line managers.• Human skills are most important f...
Managerial roles• Role is the basic behavior that is expected in a   particular situation.• The work of Henry Mintzberg is...
Figure 1.2                Mintzberg’s Managerial Roles (Managerial roles)© 2007 Thomson/South-                            ...
Mintzberg’s Managerial Roles• Interpersonal Roles   – The manager’s responsibility for managing relationships     with org...
Mintzberg’s Managerial Roles (cont’d)• Informational Roles   – The manager’s responsibility for gathering and     dissemin...
Mintzberg’s Managerial Roles (cont’d)• Decisional Roles   – The manager’s responsibility for processing information     an...
Challenges of Management:                Managing in the 21st Century• What’s different?       – The rate of change contin...
The Internet And Information                         Technology• Electronic commerce is working.       – E-businesses are ...
Increasing Globalization of the                       Marketplace• Globalization       – Various companies moving to multi...
Increasing Diversity in the Workplace• Diversity       – The heterogeneity of the population and work         force• The c...
The Growing Importance of                       Intellectual Capital• Intellectual capital        – The sum and synergy of...
Categories of Intellectual Capital• Structural capital       – The accumulated knowledge of the organization         repre...
Ethics• Ethical Behavior        – Behavior that is considered by most          to be acceptable.• Sarbanes–Oxley Act      ...
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Chapter 1 (introduction to management)

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Chapter 1 (introduction to management)

  1. 1. MGT 420INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT CHAPTER 1 Week 1
  2. 2. Outlines of the chapter1. What is management2. Levels of management3. Managerial skills4. Managerial roles5. Process of management6. Contemporary manager
  3. 3. What is Management?• The Classic Definition – The art of getting things done through people. –Mary Parker Follett• A Broader Definition – The process of administering and coordinating resources effectively, efficiently, and in an effort to achieve the goals of the organization.© 2007 Thomson/South- 1–3Western. All rights reserved.
  4. 4. The Organization• An Organization – A group of individuals who work together toward common goals.• What do all organizations have in common? – They are composed of people whose efforts must be coordinated if the organization is to accomplish its goals.© 2007 Thomson/South- 1–4Western. All rights reserved.
  5. 5. Managers• Managers are the people who plan, organize, lead, and control the activities of the organization so that its goals can be achieved.© 2007 Thomson/South- 1–5Western. All rights reserved.
  6. 6. Figure 1.1 The Management Process© 2007 Thomson/South- 1–6Western. All rights reserved.
  7. 7. Planning And Organizing• Planning – Setting goals and defining the actions necessary to achieve those goals. – It covers all levels ranging from top management to middle management group.• Organizing – The process of determining the tasks to be done, who will do them, and how those tasks will be managed and coordinated. – Organizing is important in ensuring information, resources and task flow logically and efficiently through the organization.© 2007 Thomson/South- 1–7Western. All rights reserved.
  8. 8. Leading• Leadership – The capacity to direct and motivate the members of work groups toward the accomplishment of organizational goals.• Leadership Skills: – Understanding individual/group behavior dynamics – Having the ability to motivate employees – Being an effective communicator – Being able to envision future and share that vision© 2007 Thomson/South- 1–8Western. All rights reserved.
  9. 9. Controlling• Monitoring the performance of the organization and its progress in implementing strategic and operational plans.• It includes: - what is required to achieve goals - measuring what actually happened and or is being done. – Identifying deviations between planned and actual results. – Taking corrective action – Ensuring that the organization is moving toward the achievement of its goals.© 2007 Thomson/South- 1–9Western. All rights reserved.
  10. 10. Measuring managerial performance• Effectiveness – Achieved when the organization pursues appropriate goals. – This means “doing the right things.”• Efficiency – Achieved by using the fewest inputs (e.g., people and money) to generate a given output. – This means “doing things right.”• The end result of effective and efficient management is organizational success.© 2007 Thomson/South- 1–10Western. All rights reserved.
  11. 11. Figure 1–5 An Overall Framework of Management© 2007 Thomson/South- 1–11Western. All rights reserved.
  12. 12. Scope of Responsibility: Functional and General Managers A functional manager is A functional manager is A general manager is A general manager is responsible for aawork group responsible for work group responsible for several responsible for several segmented by function. segmented by function. functional work groups. functional work groups. Chief Executive General Parts Inc. VP of VP of Finance Production Plant Service Account Payroll Manager Manager Manager Manager© 2007 Thomson/South- 1–12Western. All rights reserved.
  13. 13. Managers responsibility• Functional managers; responsible for work groups that are segmented according to function. E.g; manager of an accounting department. They have to work inter departments or units.• General managers responsible for ensuring that several functions or parts of the organization work together effectively. They must coordinate and integrate the work of diverse parts of the organization.
  14. 14. Figure 1.3 Managerial Levels (managers at different level)© 2007 Thomson/South- 1–14Western. All rights reserved.
  15. 15. Managers at different level• First line managers Eg. production supervisor. The objective is to ensure that the products and services of their organizations are delivered to customers on a day-to day basis.• Middle managers (linking groups) Eg. Department head. They perform as a linkages between top managers and first line managers. The objective is to allocate resource effectively and manage the first line managers who supervise the work group so that the overall goals of the organization can be achieved.• Top level managers (an eye on the outside) eg. CEO, CFO. They provide strategic direction for the organization. Have the ability to think, analyze causes, effects and consequences.
  16. 16. Management Skills• Technical Skills – The ability to utilize the knowledge of tools, techniques, and procedures that are specific to a particular field.• Human Skills – The ability to work effectively with one’s own work group as well as others within the organization.• Conceptual Skills – The ability to process information about the internal/external environment of the organization and determine its implications.© 2007 Thomson/South- 1–16Western. All rights reserved.
  17. 17. Figure 1.4 Skills Needed at Different Levels of Management© 2007 Thomson/South- 1–17Western. All rights reserved.
  18. 18. Management skills• Technical skills tend to be most important for first line managers.• Human skills are most important for middle managers because these managers must coordinate the efforts of members of one’s work group as well as coordinate with other work group within the organization.• The top level managers need to have strong conceptual skills if they are to effectively accomplish their jobs.
  19. 19. Managerial roles• Role is the basic behavior that is expected in a particular situation.• The work of Henry Mintzberg is widely used to explain the roles that managers typically perform.• There are three categories of roles that have been found:1. Interpersonal roles2. Informational roles3. Decisional roles.
  20. 20. Figure 1.2 Mintzberg’s Managerial Roles (Managerial roles)© 2007 Thomson/South- 1–20Western. All rights reserved.
  21. 21. Mintzberg’s Managerial Roles• Interpersonal Roles – The manager’s responsibility for managing relationships with organizational members and other constituents:• Figurehead (perform certain duties that are primarily ceremonial in nature, e.g attend social event).• Leader (they work with and through their employees to ensure that the organization’s goal are met).• Liaison (they coordinate the activities between individuals and work groups within the organization and develop favorable relationship with outside organization, e.g social responsibility)© 2007 Thomson/South- 1–21Western. All rights reserved.
  22. 22. Mintzberg’s Managerial Roles (cont’d)• Informational Roles – The manager’s responsibility for gathering and disseminating information to the stakeholders of the organization (communication center and source) • Monitor (managers continually scan the internal and external environments of their organizations for useful information – opportunities and threats) • Disseminator (managers share and distribute the information so that the employees can perform their work) • Spokesperson (managers must often communicate information to individual outside their units and their organization).© 2007 Thomson/South- 1–22Western. All rights reserved.
  23. 23. Mintzberg’s Managerial Roles (cont’d)• Decisional Roles – The manager’s responsibility for processing information and reaching conclusions: • Entrepreneur (managers initiates projects that capitalizes on opportunities that have been identified) • Disturbance handler (they must cope with conflict and handle disturbances) • Resource allocator (managers determine which projects will receive organizational resources) • Negotiator (managers spend a good portion of their time negotiating with employees, suppliers and others.© 2007 Thomson/South- 1–23Western. All rights reserved.
  24. 24. Challenges of Management: Managing in the 21st Century• What’s different? – The rate of change continues to increase• What’s the same? – The same basic business, economic, and managerial principles still apply• Important change factors: – The Internet and information technology – Increasing globalization – Increasing diversity – Intellectual capital – Increased emphasis on ethics.© 2007 Thomson/South- 1–24Western. All rights reserved.
  25. 25. The Internet And Information Technology• Electronic commerce is working. – E-businesses are using basic managerial and business principles and are profitable. – Traditional, brick-and-mortar businesses use of the Internet as a complement their existing businesses.• Benefits of Information Technology – Instant feedback from the market – More sharing of information internally – Tighter links to suppliers – Increased globalization and global expansion© 2007 Thomson/South- 1–25Western. All rights reserved.
  26. 26. Increasing Globalization of the Marketplace• Globalization – Various companies moving to multiple countries and doing business in multiple countries.• The international business environment – Involves most organizations—even the smallest business can reach a global marketplace with relative ease. – Presents unique managerial challenges in terms of complexity and a broader set of environmental forces.© 2007 Thomson/South- 1–26Western. All rights reserved.
  27. 27. Increasing Diversity in the Workplace• Diversity – The heterogeneity of the population and work force• The challenge of diversity – Developing the strong organizational culture and group cohesiveness required for organizational success when the workplace includes people with different backgrounds, from different nations, or with different cultural frames of reference.© 2007 Thomson/South- 1–27Western. All rights reserved.
  28. 28. The Growing Importance of Intellectual Capital• Intellectual capital – The sum and synergy of an organization’s knowledge, experience, relationships, processes, discoveries, innovations, market presence and community influence.• Major categories of intellectual capital – Structural capital – Customer capital – Human capital© 2007 Thomson/South- 1–28Western. All rights reserved.
  29. 29. Categories of Intellectual Capital• Structural capital – The accumulated knowledge of the organization represented by its patents, trademarks and copyrights, proprietary databases, and systems.• Customer capital – The value of established relationships with customers and suppliers.• Human capital – The cumulative skills and knowledge of the organization.© 2007 Thomson/South- 1–29Western. All rights reserved.
  30. 30. Ethics• Ethical Behavior – Behavior that is considered by most to be acceptable.• Sarbanes–Oxley Act – Requires businesses to use certain accounting rules that would prohibit the many financial abuses by managers that came to light in recent years.© 2007 Thomson/South- 1–30Western. All rights reserved.

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