Dietary analysis pres

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Dietary analysis pres

  1. 1. Ruben Carranza Dietary Analysis HUN1201 11:00-11:50pm Professor Rosa Polanco 11/3/13
  2. 2. Within me, there is a great battle waging on. To the left, there is that side of me that wants instant gratification without regard to my future health. The right side of me thirsts for discipline and a healthy lifestyle. It is up to me to decide whom I will obey. Vs. “But I discipline my body and keep it under control, lest after preaching to others I myself should be disqualified.” 1 Corinthians 9:27
  3. 3. Table of Contents Part 1: Usual Diet Part II: Revised Diet Part III: Analysis •Food list (Slide 5) •Bar Graph Report (Slide 6) •Nutrition Facts Report (Slide 7) •Calorie Assessment (Slide 8) •My Plate Report (Slide 9) •Food list (Slide 10) •Bar Graph Report (Slide 11) •Calorie Assessment (Slide 12) •My Plate Report (Slide 13) •Two Day Comparison (Slide 14-16) •Interpretation, Conclusions and Implications for the Future •Section 1(Slide 17-20) •Section 2 (Slide 21-23) •Section 33 (Slide 24-25) •Works Cited (Slide 26)
  4. 4. For the purposes of achieving a more nutritious diet, these vitamin supplements have not been included in this analysis.
  5. 5. Food List (Part 1) Breakfast •1.5 cups of Cereal, Complete Wheat Bran Flakes (Kellogg Company) [180 Cal] •1 cup of Soy Milk, vanilla (Silk) [101 Cal] • 2 teaspoons of Greek Yogurt, [37 Cal] Lunch •Sandwich, ham cheese, w/whole wheat [444 Cal] •Juice Drink, fruit punch, 10% juice, box (Hi-C) [147 Cal] •28.4 g of Veggie Chips (Robert's American Gourmet) [120 Cal] •Energy bar, peanut butter (Clif Bar) [240 Cal] •1 pack of sandwich crackers toasty, w/peanut butter fill [200 Cal] Dinner •1 lb of Spaghetti, w/meatballs [663 Cal] •8 oz of Salad, chicken, w/dressing [139 Cal] •3 cups of apple juice (Everfresh) [330 Cal] •1 medium fresh apple [95 Cal] Snacks • Two Granola bars, oatmeal raisin, chewy [180 Cal] • 2 qts of water [0]
  6. 6. Bar graph Report
  7. 7. Nutrition Facts Formats the analysis as a Nutrition Facts label. Profile Info Personal: Ruben Carranza Male 19 yrs 5 ft 9 in 178 lb Nutrition Facts Report Day(s): 2013 Oct 21 (All) Activity Level: Active (Strive for an Active activity level.) BMI: 26.3 Normal is 18.5 to 25. Weight Change: None Best not to exceed 2 lbs per week. Nutrition Facts Serving Size ( 4440 g ) Amount Per Serving Calories 2868 Calories from Fat 812 % Daily Value * Total Fat 90g 89% Saturated Fat 24g 74% Trans Fat 2g Cholesterol 218mg 73% Sodium 6010mg 261% Total Carbohydrates 93% Dietary Fiber 36g 78% Sugars 218g Protein 108g 168% Vitamin A 47% Vitamin C 375% Calcium 144% Iron 670% * Percent Daily Values are based on your custom
  8. 8. Calorie Assessment Calories to maintain weight: 3262 • Calorie adjustment for weight change of 0 lb (per week): 0 • Goal Calories: 3262 Average Daily Intake & Expenditures • Average Intake: 2868 • Average Expenditure: 2998 Calories For the Day Goal Intake Assessment Total Calories Carbohydrates (45-65% Calories) Protein (10-35% Calories) Fat (20-35% Calories) 3262 2868 Below Goal 1467 to 2120 1642 In Range 326 to 1141 427 In Range 652 to 1141 799 In Range
  9. 9. My Plate Report Intake vs. Recommendation 3200 Calorie Pattern Group Percent Comparison Grains Intake * 9.9 oz equivalent 99 % 10. oz equivalent Grains Recommendation Vegetables Intake 1.0 cup equivalent 24 % 4.0 cup equivalent Vegetables Fruits Intake Amount 4.6 cup equivalent 185 % 2.5 cup equivalent Fruits Recommendation Dairy Intake 1.7 cup equivalent 56 % 3.0 cup equivalent Dairy Recommendation Protein Foods Intake 5.5 oz equivalent 78 % 7.0 oz equivalent Protein Foods Recommendation Make Half Your Grains Whole Vary Your Vegetables Aim for at least 5.0 whole grains a day Dark Green Vegetables 3.0 cups weekly Orange Vegetables 2.5 cups weekly Oils & Empty Calories Dry Beans & Peas 3.5 cups weekly Aim for 11.0 teaspoons of oils a day Starchy Vegetables 9.0 cups weekly Limit your extra fats & sugars to 648 Calories Other Vegetables 10. cups weekly
  10. 10. Part II: Food List Breakfast • 1 cup of vanilla Soymilk [101 Cal] • 1.3 cup of Crispy Rice[132 Cal] Lunch Snacks • Ham cheese sandwich, w/whole wheat [444 Cal] • 6 ounces of fresh spinach leaves [39 Cal] • 28.3 grams of veggie chips [120 Cal] • Blueberry pastry (Fiber One) [91 Cal] • Bar, energy, peanut butter (Clif Bar) [240 Cal] • Fresh medium apple [95 Cal] • Bottled water [0] • 28.3 grams of veggie chips [120 Cal] • 1 whole wheat bagel [260 Cal] • 1 Tablespoon of low fat cream cheese [30 Cal] • 2 Teaspoons of Jam [33 Cal] • 2 cups of low fat chocolate milk [315 Cal] • 1 cup of vanilla soymilk [101 Cal] Dinner • 0.8 cup of brown rice [175 Cal] • .0.5 cup of black beans [114 Cal] • 2 cups of orange juice [223 Cal] • Chicken breasts w/o skin [284 Cal] • 3 ounces of spinach leaves [20 Cal] • 0.3 cup of grilled mushrooms [13 Cal] • 5 ounces of fresh avocado [170 Cal]
  11. 11. Bar Graph Report
  12. 12. Calorie Assessment A close-up picture of the Calories consumed. Profile Info Personal: Ruben Carranza Male 19 yrs 5 ft 9 in 178 lb Calorie Assessment Day(s): 2013 Oct 28 (All) Activity Level: Active (Strive for an Active activity level.) BMI: 26.3 Normal is 18.5 to 25. Weight Change: None Best not to exceed 2 lbs per week. Calories to maintain current weight Calories to maintain current weight 3262 Calorie adjustment for weight change of 0 lb (per week) 0 Goal Calories 3262 Average Daily Intake & Expenditures Average Intake 3119 Average Expenditure 3143 Calories For The Day Intake Assessment 3262 3119 Below Goal 1467 to 2120 1748 In Range Protein (10-35% Calories) 326 to 1141 654 In Range Fat (20-35% Calories) 652 to 1141 718 In Range Total Calories Carbohydrates (45-65% Calories) Goal
  13. 13. My Plate Report Intake vs. Recommendation 3200 Calorie Pattern Group Grains Intake Percent Comparison 10. oz equivalent 5.5 cup equivalent 138 % 4.0 cup equivalent Vegetables Fruits Intake 4.6 cup equivalent 182 % 2.5 cup equivalent Fruits Recommendation Dairy Intake 4.5 cup equivalent 152 % 3.0 cup equivalent Dairy Recommendation Protein Foods Intake 10. oz equivalent 146 % 7.0 oz equivalent Protein Foods Recommendation Make Half Your Grains Whole * 10. oz equivalent 108 % Grains Recommendation Vegetables Intake Amount Vary Your Vegetables
  14. 14. 2 Day Comparison
  15. 15. 2 Day Comparison Cont..
  16. 16. 2 Day Comparison Cont..
  17. 17. Part III: Analysis of Results  Did the revised diet meet your goals for the macronutrients and micronutrients? Yes. DRI Goal Goal % Carbs 448.46 99% Protein 64.59 258% Fat 101.47 80% Micronutrient DRI Goal Goal % Minerals Calcium 1,000.00 236% DRI Goal Goal % Vitamin A Macro Nutrients Micronutrient 900.00 205% Thiamin 1.20 284% Riboflavin 1.30 373% Niacin 16.00 377% Vitamin B6 1.30 299% Vitamin B12 2.40 503% Vitamin C 90.00 496% Vitamin D 15.00 77% Vitamins Iron 8.00 505% Magnesium 400.00 213% Phosphorus 700.00 340% Vitamin E 15.00 223% Potassium 4,700.00 138% Folate 400.00 237% sodium 2,300.00 174% zinc 11.00 157%
  18. 18. What foods provided the highest nutrient density in your revised diet? • The following foods provide the highest nutrient density in my diet: spinach, crispy rice cereal, orange juice, and my Clif energy bar. Are you at risk for deficiency or toxicity? Compare and contrast your regular day and revised day.  Fat Soluble Vitamins ◦ A  Although I did not meet the DRI goal in my first day, I was able to raise it up to 205 % on my revised day.  For this vitamin, I do not need to worry about it being deficient. I simply enjoy eating the spinach salad that my mother prepares for me. On the other hand, toxicity will not be a problem because I was far from reaching its UL (3000 REA), and most of its source are vegetables. ◦ D  On both days, I was not able to meet the DRI goal for this vitamin. However, on the revised day, I consumed more milk in order to bring vitamin D to an adequate level.  Because the vitamin supplement I consume gives 800IU of vitamin D, I normally would not be in danger of deficiency or toxicity. Nevertheless, I must increase my time outside in the sunlight and eat more seafood and dairy products in order to prevent deficiency . ◦ E  I had no trouble reaching the DRI goal for this vitamin. On both days, I more than doubled the recommended amount because of the cereal and energy bars I consume.  I am not in danger of deficiency or toxicity. ◦ K  Albeit Vitamin K is not listed in this Dietary Analysis, I need not to worry about deficiency of this vitamin because I frequently consume spinach in my diet.
  19. 19.  Water Soluble Vitamins ◦ Thiamin   On both days, I met DRI requirements for this vitamin My major sources of this vitamin were the cereal and the ham and cheese sandwich I consumed on both days, so there were no possibilities of deficiency. ◦ Riboflavin   I consumed almost equal amount of this vitamin on both days, most of them coming from cereal. I also surpassed the DRI goal by triple the recommended amount. I am not in danger of either deficiency of toxicity. ◦ Niacin   On my revised day I consumed a little more of Niacin than on my first. Most of it came from cereal and chicken. The UL is 35 mg/day from supplements, and the supplement I use gives me 10mg/day. Despite going over the UL, I do not qualify for toxicity or deficiency because my sources come from real food and not from the nicotinic acid form found in supplements. Nevertheless, I still need to keep a close watch on my Niacin intake. ◦ B6   On my revised day, I was able to cut down my B6 levels by 25% and still exceed the DRI goal for both days. Since the UL for this vitamins is 100 mg/day and I reached 3.88 mg/day, I do not need to worry about toxicity. ◦ B12   On my revised day, I consumed a whopping 12.07 mcg/day, most of it coming from soy milk. This is much less than my first day which had 17.60 mcg/day. Because there is no UL set for this vitamin, I need not to worry about deficiency or toxicity ◦ C   Because I consumed more orange juice on my revised day, its DRI levels are significantly higher than my first day Since the UL for vitamin C are 2 g/day, there is little possibility for me to achieve a toxic or deficient level. ◦ Folate • • My folate intake notably increased on my revised day, most of it coming from black beans, spinach, and cereal. Since the UL only applies to synthetic folic acid, I am not at risk for deficiency or toxicity.
  20. 20.  Minerals ◦ Calcium   My sources for my revised day were milk, an energy bar, and the ham and cheese sandwich. As a result, my calcium levels were much higher on my revised day. Although I exceeded the DRI goal with a 236%, I still did not pass its UL of 2500 mg/day. ◦ Iron   On both days, I had high amounts of Iron, mostly from cereal, an energy bar, and spinach. I was able to cut down my iron intake to 40.44 mg/day on my revised day (UL is 45 mg/day). However, I still must keep a close watch on my intake of iron. ◦ Magnesium   My intake of this nutrient doubled on my revised day, most if it coming from spinach the energy bar, and the ham and cheese sandwich. Keeping in mind that the UL only applies to nonfoods, I am not in danger of deficiency or toxicity. ◦ Phosphorus   Once again, my phosphorus intake doubled on my revised day, most of it coming from the hand and cheese sandwich and the 2 cups of chocolate milk. My revised intake (2,383.43 mg/day) still does not pass its UL (3 to 4g). ◦ Potassium   On my first day, I only met the DRI halfway, but I thoroughly surpassed on my revised day. Most of my food sources were from orange juice, spinach, and milk. I am not in danger of toxicity of deficiency because there is no UL set. ◦ Sodium   I was able to cut down on sodium on my revised day. However, the ham and cheese sandwich still kept its level very high at 4004. 43 mg/day. Like 95% of Americans today, my diet passes the set UL (2.3g). Undoubtedly, eating less pork will lower my sodium levels. ◦ Zinc  By removing Bran Flakes from my revised day, I was able to cut my zinc intake in half and still meet the DRI goal. Wardlaw, Smith,  By reaching a level 17.25 mg/day, I was able to avoid the risk of toxicity and deficiency. and Collene ch. 8,9
  21. 21. Did you achieve your goal of consuming 8 servings of fruits and vegetables per day? (Yes) Intake vs. Recommendation 3200 Calorie Pattern Intake vs. Recommendation Group Grains Intake Grains Recommendation Group Grains Intake Vegetables Intake Percent Comparison Pattern 3200 Calorie Percent Comparison 10. oz equivalent 4.0 cup equivalent 5.5 cup equivalent 4.6 138 % 182 4.0 cup equivalent 2.5 4.6 cup equivalent 4.5 182 % 152 2.5 cup equivalent 3.0 Fruits Recommendation Dairy Recommendation Dairy Intake Protein Foods Intake 4.5 cup equivalent 10. oz equivalent 152 % 146 3.0 cup equivalent 7.0 oz equivalent Dairy Recommendation Protein Foods Recommendation Protein Foods Intake Make Half Your Grains Whole Protein least 5.0 whole grains a day Aim for atFoods Recommendation Make Half Your Grains Whole Oils & Empty Calories Aim for at least 5.0 whole grains a day 10. oz Amount equivalent * 10. oz equivalent 5.5 cup equivalent 108 % 138 Vegetables Fruits Recommendation Fruits Intake Dairy Intake * 10. oz equivalent 108 % Grains Recommendation Vegetables Vegetables Intake Fruits Intake Amount 146 % Vary Your Vegetables Dark Green Vegetables 10. oz equivalent 7.0 oz equivalent 3.0 cups weekly Orange Vegetables 2.5 cups weekly Dry Beans & Peas Dark Green Vegetables 3.5 3.0 cups weekly cups weekly Vary Your Vegetables
  22. 22. What is the importance of meeting this goal in terms of health? Fruits and vegetables are high sources of phytochemicals, which phytochemicals were provided by your revised diet?  Fruits and vegetables are highly dense in nutrients and contain phytochemicals that are not found in vitamin supplements. Moreover, research indicates that certain phytochemicals help prevent the growth of cancer cells.  Fruits ◦ Oranges  carotenoids, monoterpenes, flavonoids, and fructooligosaccharides. ◦ Apples   Vegetables ◦  polyphenols, carotenoids, and flavonoids. Fresh leaf spinach  carotenoids, indoles, isothiocyanates Others ◦ Soy  phytosterols, and isoflavones. ◦ Whole Grains  ◦ Lignans Chocolate  Flavonoids Wardlaw, Smith, and Collene 14
  23. 23. Did you utilize the principles of healthy diet planning-moderation, adequacy, variety and balance effectively? (Yes)  Moderation ◦ In order to adjust my portions to the appropriate size, I had to make various changes to my original diet. I changed my cereal from Bran Flakes to Crispy Rice in order to prevent toxicity in iron. Moreover, I chose low-fat chocolate milk and soy milk to prevent my fat intake from piling up. I also was keen on increasing my water intake. Because I did so, I did not wake up the next morning dehydrated like I normally do. Therefore, I paid close attention to my the portions of my diet in order to reach adequate levels.  Adequacy ◦ My diet contains all of the nutrients and energy responsible for a healthy lifestyle.    I met 96% of my Caloric needs and 100% of my water needs. Much of my nutrients are provided by nutrient dense foods such as soymilk, spinach, and avocados. Variety ◦ Because I live with a beautiful Dominican mother who is a wonderful cook, I always see plenty of variety on my dinner plate. In this way, I can acquire specific nutrients that are not available in other foods. In grains alone, I had a bagel, brown rice, a sandwich with whole wheat bread, and an energy bar.  Balance ◦ I made sure in my revised day that my plate was filled with different colors and that it would provide sufficient energy for me. For example, in dinner alone I met four out of the five major food groups. Wardlaw, Smith, and Collene 3638
  24. 24. What is your BMI? Is it healthy? What are the guidelines for BMI? What are the health implications of an unhealthy BMI?  26.3. It is not healthy because it falls under the overweight category of 25 to 29.9 BMI.  The BMI categories are the following: ◦ ◦ Normal weight 18.5 – 24.9 ◦ Overweight 25 – 29.9 ◦  Underweight <18.5 Obesity > 30 For individuals who do not have a healthy weight are at risk for at least one of the following conditions: ◦ There could be a drastic increase in LDL of “bad” cholesterol. This leads to the clogging of the arteries. ◦ An unhealthy BMI could also indicate a family history full of obesity and diseases such as a cardiovascular disease and certain forms of cancer. ◦ Hypertension, when systolic and diastolic blood pressure go over the recommended value, is also a risk factor. ◦ High glucose levels, which can lead to diabetes, also result from an unhealthy BMI. Wardlaw, Smith, and Collene 252253
  25. 25. Discuss your family history of chronic diseases. What additional changes would you have to make in the future to prevent diseases you are at risk for ? Of the changes you made in this class and/or after this project, which ones are you likely to continue practicing?  There has been some cases of hypertension in my mom’s side of the family. Currently, my mom takes medications to lower her blood pressure and cholesterol.  One way to prevent hypertension in my diet is to avoid high levels sodium typically found in pork. Instead of eating a ham and cheese sandwich, I could opt for a healthier alternative, a such as a chicken or tuna sandwich. Moreover, eating more whole wheat bread will lower my sodium intake.  This class has showed me the great importance of consuming the right amounts of water per day. Before taking nutrition, I did not realize that water is itself a nutrient and how vital it was to the human body. Now, I have been sleeping better because of my adequate water intake. I will also not be so dependent on my vitamin supplements in the future. In this way, I can receive the phytochemicals found in whole foods in order to achieve a long, healthy life.
  26. 26. Works Cited  Wardlaw, M. Gordon, Anne M. Smith, and Angela L. Collene. Contemporary Nutrition. New York: The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc, 2013. Print

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