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Towards a Reputation Economy: How Openness and Transparency Become a Central Business Strategy for Cultural Heritage

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Towards a Reputation Economy: How Openness and Transparency Become a Central Business Strategy for Cultural Heritage

  1. 1. How Openness and Transparency Become a TOWARDS A Central Business Strategy for Cultural Heritage REPUTATION ECONOMYRobert SteinDeputy Director for Research,Technology, and Engagement
  2. 2. WHAT IS A REPUTATION ECONOMY?Flickr Credit ~rednuht
  3. 3. THE REPUTATION ECONOMY But heres the interesting paradox: The reputation economy creates an incentive to be more open, not less. Since Internet commentary is inescapable, the only way to influence it is to be part of it. Being transparent, opening up, posting interesting material frequently and often is the only way to amass positive links to yourself and thus to directly influence your Googleable reputation. Putting out more evasion or PR puffery wont work, because people will either ignore it and not link to it - or worse, pick the spin apart and enshrine those criticisms high on your Google list of life. Clive Thompson, “The See-Through CEO” WIRED Magazine - Issue 15.04, March, 2007Flickr Credit ~rednuht
  4. 4. SUPPLYDEMAND
  5. 5. 2011 Forbes Reputation Survey70%60%50%40% Purchasing30% Advocacy20%10% 0% Perception of Product Perception of CompanySource http://www.forbes.com/2011/06/08/reputation-economy-stupid.html WHAT DRIVES PURCHASING DECISIONS?
  6. 6. 79% of HRprofessionals useonline reputation in theirhiring processSource: Microsoft – 2010, http://bit.ly/cPsOXX Flickr Credit ~ helenasicily
  7. 7. THE REPUTATIONECONOMY EXISTSDriven by:- Rise in access to information- Rise in public awareness to that fact- Rise in a culture of participation Flickr Credit ~altus
  8. 8. REPUTATION AND CULTURAL HERITAGE Flickr Credit ~adforce1
  9. 9. REPUTATION AND CULTURAL HERITAGEAttendance isDISCRETIONARY and NOTprescriptive of LONG-TERMsuccess Flickr Credit ~adforce1
  10. 10. REPUTATION AND CULTURAL HERITAGEFunding is increasinglySCARCE and driven bySOCIAL IMPACT Flickr Credit ~adforce1
  11. 11. REPUTATION AND CULTURAL HERITAGEPhilanthropy is fueled byRELATIONSHIP and PASTPERFORMANCE Flickr Credit ~adforce1
  12. 12. REPUTATION AND CULTURAL HERITAGEThere is no outside world anymore, just a world.one that is blogged, Facebooked, Twittered, andutterly porous. The extent to which we cancontrol our image is directly proportionate to ourhonesty about ups and downs in a context thatwe can to some degree define -Maxwell L. Anderson Flickr Credit ~adforce1
  13. 13. source ~donsolo
  14. 14. THE REPUTATION ECONOMYAND SOCIAL CAPITAL
  15. 15. THE REPUTATION ECONOMYAND SOCIAL CAPITAL Whereas physical capital refers to physical objects and human capital refers to the properties of individuals, social capital refers to connections among individuals – social networks and the norms of reciprocity and trustworthiness that arise from them. In that sense social capital is closely related to what some have called “civic virtue.” The difference is that social capital calls attention to the fact that civic virtue is most powerful when embedded in a sense network of reciprocal social relations. A society of many virtuous but isolated individuals is not necessarily rich in social capital. Robert Putnam, Bowling Alone, 2000
  16. 16. IS OUR SOCIAL CAPITALBANKRUPT ALREADY?
  17. 17. REPUTATION HASMANY FACETS PUBLIC PROFESSIONAL FUNDERSFlickr Credit ~swamibu
  18. 18. Strategies of…TRANSPARENCYCOLLABORATIONSHARING Lead to… SOCIAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT
  19. 19. WHAT ISTRANSPARENCY? Trans-par-en-cy: “The full accurate and timely disclosure of information” -Wall Street Words http://www.dictionary.com Flickr Credit: ~marcomagrini
  20. 20. kalexanderson/transparencyIF YOU CAN’T AVOID IT… EMBRACE IT!
  21. 21. Some facts INDIANAPOLIS THE About the IMA MUSEUM OF ART127 YEARS152 ACRES300 STAFF
  22. 22. Enrich Permanent THE INDIANAPOLIS Collection MUSEUM OF ART54,000 OBJECTS428,000 VISITORS1M WEB VISITORS
  23. 23. IMA’S CHALLENGES
  24. 24. “The Indianapolis Museum of Art might bethe web-smartest museum in America, andits blog is one of my favorite daily reads” – Tyler Green, Modern Art Notes
  25. 25. IMA DASHBOARD Launch: Sept 2007 Goals: Simplicity Deep Dives Workflow Flexibility
  26. 26. w
  27. 27. “Of course, such systems [dashboards] raise a rather vexing challenge:what, exactly, are the few key indicators you would need to watch to monitoryour success? Its this question that actually proves to be more effectivethan the dashboard tool itself. To know what you should monitor, you needto know what youre trying to do, and you also have to define what successlooks like (more people? happier people? more art? better reviews? prolificartists?).” Andrew Taylor, “Keeping an Eye on Dashboards”, The Artful Manager Blog, October 20, 2006,.
  28. 28. “The root of the problem is that there is no longer an agreed-upon methodof measuring achievement… While many challenges beset art museumleaders today, finding a way to measure performance is accordingly amongthe field’s most urgent… Without generally accepted metrics, artsorganizations will have more and more trouble making a case forthemselves.” Maxwell L. Anderson, “Metrics of Success in Art Museums”, Getty Leadership Institute (2004),.
  29. 29. RESULTSFOR THE IMA GOOD PRESS WELL RECEIVED BY PEERS CLARIFYING GOALS INSPIRED OTHERS
  30. 30. OVERCOMING FEAR COMPARE AND DESPAIR
  31. 31. OVERCOMING FEAR ACTUAL FAILURE Flickr Credit ~sziszo
  32. 32. WHY FAILING PUBLICLY IS GOOD HIGHLIGHTS SUCCESS DISPELLS ASSUMPTION OF SPIN DOCUMENTS A NEED FOR CHANGEFlickr Credit: ~carowallis1
  33. 33. BENCHMARKING “Thus, benchmarking has many direct and indirect benefits: increasing the impact of mission-related activities, raising internal standards, improving performance, attracting more funding, uncovering (and fixing) hidden weaknesses, and overall, improving the public face of the organization.” Jason Saul Benchmarking for nonprofits Fieldstone Alliance, 2004, pg 12
  34. 34. AAMDSTATISTICALSURVEY
  35. 35. IMA’S DIRTY LITTLE SECRETTHE DASHBOARD IS FOR STAFF
  36. 36. HOW CAN MUSEUMSPURSUE EXCELLENCE? Flickr Credit ~adforce1
  37. 37. W. EDWARDS DEMING
  38. 38. KaizenKAI = change or to correctZEN = goodKAIZEN = a system of continuous improvement
  39. 39. CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENTEXECUTEEVALUATEREPEAT
  40. 40. Strategies of…TRANSPARENCYCOLLABORATIONSHARING Lead to… SOCIAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT
  41. 41. AUTHORITATIVE VS AUTHORITARIAN HOW DO YOU ESTABLISHAUTHORITY
  42. 42. JULIA CHILD
  43. 43. Julia’s Kitchen atAMERICAN MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY Flickr Credit ~kevharb
  44. 44. Cultural Heritage &COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGEFlickr Credit ~jasoneppink
  45. 45. Visitor InclusionIMA’S offense to Bruce, but who doesn’t want • No STRATEGIES FOR this?COLLABORATION source ~victoriapeckham
  46. 46. Steve.Museum Exploring Applications of Social Tagging for Museums Founded in 2005 2006 Institute for Museum and Library Services (IMLS) National Leadership Research Grant 2008 IMLS NLG Steve In Action 2008 IMLS NLG Research Grant T3: Text, Tags, Trust Open Source software supporting tagging in museums
  47. 47. 33 Partners• MoMA• National Gallery of Art, USA• Metropolitan Museum of Art• Museo Nacional del Prado• Van Gogh Museum• Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen
  48. 48. SAY HELLO TOTAP
  49. 49. Museums• Balboa Park Online Collaborative • National Air and Space Museum• Dallas Museum of Art • The Smithsonian• The Eiteljorg Museum of Native Vendors American and Western Art • AdLib Systems• Indianapolis Museum of Art • GuideByCell• The Metropolitan Museum of Art • Imagineear• Minnesota Historical Society • MyTours• Museum of Contemporary Art, • NOUS Guides San Diego • Tristan Systems• Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
  50. 50. MFA Boston
  51. 51. Gemeente Museum Den Haag
  52. 52. Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art
  53. 53. Online ScholarlyCatalogue Initiative
  54. 54. RESULTSFOR THE IMA $3.2M GRANTS SINCE 2006 $1.2M CONSULTING SINCE 2009 +89% WEB TRAFFIC SINCE 2008EXCEEDS EXHIBITION REVENUE BY > 50% IN FY12
  55. 55. DECLININGSOCIAL CAPITAL? Putnam suggests in Bowling Alone that the individualizing nature of technology is at least partially reponsible for an observed decline in social capital. I DISAGREE
  56. 56. CULTURAL HERITAGENEEDS THE REPUTATIONECONOMY
  57. 57. THANK YOU!@rjstein

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