Teaching Grammar
RICKY A. SOLERO
CLASS REPORTER
How do I teach grammar?


There are a number of questions that first need to be
addressed for each class.


What are the objectives of this clas...
What are the objectives of this class?

The answer to this
question
is
important as it will
help you decide on
how
much
gr...
What type of learning background
do the learners have?
Adults who have not been
attending school for a
number of years are...
What learning materials and
resources are available?


The more learning
resources you have
the easier it will be
for you...
What kind of learning style does
each student have?


This is one of the most difficult aspects of
teaching - especially ...
Mention the word “grammar” and
students will cringe. In fact, most
teachers will cringe, too.
Grammar shouldn’t be taught “by the book”. At
least not in teaching English as a second
language.
 

That’s not what students are there for.

They don't want to know all of these rules;

they’re not interested in them.
T...
So, how do we as
ESL teachers teach
them essential
grammar and give
them what we
need, rather than
boring them to
death wi...
Teaching Grammar In Context
A little bit of grammar and vocabulary
can go a long way if you know how to
use it, and for that you need real
natural CON...
Many people do not connect well
to math instruction either despite
the often sad attempts to relate its
application to the...
How to teach Grammar in
Context?
Determine meaningful grammatical
contexts for students
selecting books that are ageapprop...
David Nunan
describes it as an
“organic approach”,
comparing learning
grammar with
growing a garden.
The linguistic flowers of the garden
are growing at a different speed and
appear at different time of the year.
The way th...
Inductive and Deductive
Teaching
INDUCTIVE is known as a
Inductive
'bottom up' approach. In other
words, students discovering
grammar rules while working
t...
For

example:

A reading comprehension
which includes a number of
sentences describing what a
person has done up to that
...
After

doing the reading
comprehension, the teacher
could begin to ask questions
such as: How long has he
done this or th...
To help the students
inductively understand the
difference between the simple
past and the present perfect,
these question...
DEDUCTIVE
Deductive is known as a 'top
down' approach. This is the
standard teaching approach
that has a teacher explainin...
For
The

example:

present perfect is made
up of the auxiliary verb 'have'
plus the past participle. It is
used to expre...
SUGGESTED GRAMMAR LESSON
OUTLINE
Begin with an exercise, game,
listening, etc. that introduces the
grammar concept.

Ask s...
Follow with another exercise that more
specifically focuses on the grammar
concept, but takes an inductive
approach. This ...
At this point introduce teaching
explanations as a way of clearing
up misunderstandings.

Provide an exercise which focuse...
As you can see, the teacher is
facilitating students to do
their own learning rather than
using the 'top down' approach
of...
thANK
YOU!
Teaching grammar
Teaching grammar
Teaching grammar
Teaching grammar
Teaching grammar
Teaching grammar
Teaching grammar
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Teaching grammar

  1. 1. Teaching Grammar RICKY A. SOLERO CLASS REPORTER
  2. 2. How do I teach grammar?
  3. 3.  There are a number of questions that first need to be addressed for each class.  What are the objectives of this class?  What type of learning background do the learners have?  What learning materials and resources are available?  What kind of learning style does each student have?
  4. 4. What are the objectives of this class? The answer to this question is important as it will help you decide on how much grammar really needs to be taught.
  5. 5. What type of learning background do the learners have? Adults who have not been attending school for a number of years are likely to find grammar explanations confusing while as students who are currently studying will probably be much more adept at understanding grammar charts, expressions, etc.
  6. 6. What learning materials and resources are available?  The more learning resources you have the easier it will be for you to employ different strategies when teaching your students grammar.
  7. 7. What kind of learning style does each student have?  This is one of the most difficult aspects of teaching - especially teaching grammar. If you have a class of learners with similar learning styles, you can afford to use a similar approach. However, if you have a class of mixed learning styles then you need to try to provide instruction using as many different methods as possible.
  8. 8. Mention the word “grammar” and students will cringe. In fact, most teachers will cringe, too.
  9. 9. Grammar shouldn’t be taught “by the book”. At least not in teaching English as a second language.
  10. 10.   That’s not what students are there for. They don't want to know all of these rules; they’re not interested in them. They want to learn English. 
  11. 11. So, how do we as ESL teachers teach them essential grammar and give them what we need, rather than boring them to death with “the rules”? It’s actually quite simple: by  teaching gram  in context.
  12. 12. Teaching Grammar In Context
  13. 13. A little bit of grammar and vocabulary can go a long way if you know how to use it, and for that you need real natural CONTEXT.
  14. 14. Many people do not connect well to math instruction either despite the often sad attempts to relate its application to the students life.
  15. 15. How to teach Grammar in Context? Determine meaningful grammatical contexts for students selecting books that are ageappropriate and interesting to students, or having students select these books themselves, is crucial. 
  16. 16. David Nunan describes it as an “organic approach”, comparing learning grammar with growing a garden.
  17. 17. The linguistic flowers of the garden are growing at a different speed and appear at different time of the year. The way these flowers grow will depend on the number of different linguistic andextralinguistic factors, among others, pedagogical factors (Pica 1985); acquisitionalprocesses (Johnston 1987), contextual environment (McCarthy 1991).
  18. 18. Inductive and Deductive Teaching
  19. 19. INDUCTIVE is known as a Inductive 'bottom up' approach. In other words, students discovering grammar rules while working through exercises.
  20. 20. For example: A reading comprehension which includes a number of sentences describing what a person has done up to that period in time.
  21. 21. After doing the reading comprehension, the teacher could begin to ask questions such as: How long has he done this or that? Has he ever been to Paris? etc. and then follow with When did he go to Paris?
  22. 22. To help the students inductively understand the difference between the simple past and the present perfect, these questions could be followed with which questions spoke about a definite time in the past? Which questions asked about the person's general experience? Etc. .
  23. 23. DEDUCTIVE Deductive is known as a 'top down' approach. This is the standard teaching approach that has a teacher explaining rules to the students.
  24. 24. For The example: present perfect is made up of the auxiliary verb 'have' plus the past participle. It is used to express an action which has begun in the past and continues into the present moment... etc.
  25. 25. SUGGESTED GRAMMAR LESSON OUTLINE Begin with an exercise, game, listening, etc. that introduces the grammar concept. Ask students questions that will help them identify the grammar concept to be discussed.
  26. 26. Follow with another exercise that more specifically focuses on the grammar concept, but takes an inductive approach. This could be a reading exercise with questions and responses in the structure that is being taught. Check responses, ask students to explain the grammar concept that has been introduced.
  27. 27. At this point introduce teaching explanations as a way of clearing up misunderstandings. Provide an exercise which focuses on the correct construction of the grammar point. This could be an exercise such as a fill the gap, cloze or tense conjugation activity. Ask students to once again explain the concept.
  28. 28. As you can see, the teacher is facilitating students to do their own learning rather than using the 'top down' approach of dictating rules to the class.
  29. 29. thANK YOU!

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