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The 21st Century Library

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presentation to CHS faculty

Published in: Economy & Finance, Education

The 21st Century Library

  1. 1. The 21 st Century Library Richard Smyth Library Media Specialist Cathedral High School 29 January 2003
  2. 2. Overview <ul><li>Collaboration between LMS and teachers </li></ul><ul><li>Curriculum Mapping: Where are we going and how are we getting there? </li></ul><ul><li>Information Power: Information Literacy </li></ul><ul><li>Web Evaluation </li></ul>
  3. 3. Collaboration: Research <ul><li>School Library Media Impact Studies show positive effects on student learning </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.lrs.org/html/about/school_studies.html </li></ul>
  4. 4. Collaboration: Evidence <ul><li>Schools with well-developed Library Media Centers (LMCs) average higher reading scores </li></ul><ul><li>When the Library Media Specialist (LMS) collab-orates with teachers, reading scores increase </li></ul>
  5. 5. LMC: Center of the School (Boring 2D Model)
  6. 6. LMC Center of the School (Dynamic 3D Model)
  7. 7. Collaboration: Purposes <ul><li>Integration of Information Literacy skills </li></ul><ul><li>Effective use of resources </li></ul><ul><li>Integration of technology </li></ul>
  8. 8. Collaboration
  9. 9. Curriculum Mapping: Literal Image
  10. 10. Curriculum Mapping: Figurative Image
  11. 11. Curriculum Mapping <ul><li>What does each teacher really do? </li></ul><ul><li>When does it get done? </li></ul><ul><li>What do we want students to know and be able to do? </li></ul><ul><li>What resources can we use? </li></ul>
  12. 12. Humorous Half-time
  13. 13. It’s Worth Repeating . . . . <ul><li>What do we want students to know and be able to do? </li></ul><ul><li>What do we want students to know and be able to do? </li></ul><ul><li>What do we want students to know and be able to do? </li></ul>
  14. 14. Monthly Meetings <ul><li>Technology Coaching </li></ul><ul><li>Curriculum Mapping </li></ul><ul><li>Collaborative Planning </li></ul><ul><li>Library Resource Assessment </li></ul>
  15. 15. Information Power (hokey computer metaphor)
  16. 16. Information Power (feminist pop-culture metaphor)
  17. 17. Information Power: Information Literacy Standards <ul><li>Information Literacy </li></ul><ul><li>Independent Learning </li></ul><ul><li>Social Responsibility </li></ul>
  18. 18. Information Power: Information Literacy <ul><li>Standard 1: The student who is information literate accesses information efficiently and effectively. </li></ul><ul><li>Standard 2: The student who is information literate evaluates information critically and competently. </li></ul><ul><li>Standard 3: The student who is information literate uses information accurately and creatively. </li></ul>
  19. 19. Information Power: Independent Learning <ul><li>Standard 4: The student who is an independent learner is information literate and pursues information related to personal interests. </li></ul><ul><li>Standard 5: The student who is an independent learner is information literate and appreciates literature and other creative expressions of information. </li></ul><ul><li>Standard 6: The student who is an independent learner is information literate and strives for excellence in information seeking and knowledge generation. </li></ul>
  20. 20. Information Power: Social Responsibility <ul><li>Standard 7: The student who contributes positively to the learning community and to society is information literate and recognizes the importance of information to a democratic society. </li></ul><ul><li>Standard 8: The student who contributes positively to the learning community and to society is information literate and practices ethical behavior in regard to information and information technology. </li></ul><ul><li>Standard 9: The student who contributes positively to the learning community and to society is information literate and participates effectively in groups to pursue and generate information. </li></ul>
  21. 21. Web Evaluation <ul><li>Key to becoming information literate </li></ul><ul><li>Asking questions </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Who owns the website and why? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Does it contain accurate, reliable information? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Is the information biased? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Is there a sponsor? If so, how credible? </li></ul></ul>
  22. 22. Resources for Teaching Web Evaluation <ul><li>Cybertours </li></ul><ul><ul><li>http://www.infosearcher.com/cybertours </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Not presently available (10/11/2007) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly </li></ul><ul><ul><li>http://lib.nmsu.edu/instruction/eval.html </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Still Available (10/11/2007) </li></ul></ul>
  23. 23. That’s All Folks
  24. 24. Acknowledgments <ul><li>Foghorn Leghorn </li></ul><ul><li>The Power Puff Girls </li></ul><ul><li>Porky the Pig </li></ul><ul><li>Pam Berger </li></ul><ul><ul><li>www.infosearcher.com </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“21 st Century Strategies for Strengthening Your School Library Program.” Bellevue, WA: Bureau of Education & Research, 2002. </li></ul></ul>

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