Greater Gainesville   Knowledge Economy Road      Map:Phase One Final Report
Project Overview and      Findings
Knowledge Economy Road Map Process   Reports 1-3 “Scan”   Literature Review   Asset Inventory   Innovation Data Analysis  ...
The Road Map is Driven bySix Critical Questions    The Selection Committee and ultimately the Project    Advisory Committe...
Requirements for Addressing the Road Map QuestionsThe Challenges and the Goals:   Assess existing capacities,        Exist...
Project Focus Areas: Analysis, Assessmentand a Value Proposition for ActionKey Issues           Specific ActionsComprehens...
Project Phases: from Analysis to Alignment                    Phase I:                          Phase II:                 ...
Data Highlights: New facts on the  uniqueness of the Gainesville economy                                                  ...
Demographic Indicators:Regional Education ExperienceEducational Attainment (% Bachelor or higher)   Source: WITS (Demograp...
Industry Overview: What is currentlydriving the regional economy? Source: Moody’s economy.comObviously the regional econom...
Key Sector Employment Growth:Key Sector Employment Growth:Five Years of Competitiveness by SectorEmployment Growth Pattern...
The Current Economic Climate         Change in Employment, Apr. 2008 – Apr. 2009                 Source: Alachua/Bradford ...
The Current Economic Climate  Unemployment Rates, Apr. 2008 vs. Apr. 2009                  Source: Alachua/Bradford Region...
Federal R&D Funding:Estimates of Non-UF Funding Recipients                                                     Five years ...
Federal Funding Recipients:A Portfolio of Private Sector Participants    The overwhelming importance of the University of ...
Portfolio of Investments in Regional R&D            Research Awards by Sponsor, 2008     (in Millions)               Sourc...
Driving Innovation and Economic Growth        Research Awards by Academic Unit, 2008 (in Millions)                 Source:...
Federal Investment ‘Bets’ on Gainesville’sKnowledge       Breakdown of Federal Awards by Agency, 2008              Source:...
Specific National Institutes of HealthGainesville Investments: Indications ofFuture Opportunities                Breakdown...
Converting R&D Investment into NewFirms, Products, and Jobs           University of Florida Technology Transfer Income    ...
Research Findings: GainesvilleKnowledge Economy Building BlocksInnovationDriver     Clean          “Smart”          Nanote...
Human          Industry Target #1:Life Science   Human Life ScienceGeneral BackgroundMajor sub-sectors within this industr...
Human               Industry Target #1:Life Science        Human Life ScienceGainesville Cancer Assets            Gainesvi...
Human             Industry Target #1:Life Science      Human Life ScienceGainesville Genetics Assets   Gainesville Regener...
Agricultural   Industry Target #2:Life Science   Agricultural-based Life               Sciences General Observations Major...
Agricultural     Industry Target #2:Life Science     Agricultural-based Life                 Sciences  Gainesville Crop   ...
Alternative     Industry Target #3:Energy          Alternative EnergyGeneral ObservationsMajor markets in this industry in...
Alternative         Industry Target #3:Energy              Alternative EnergyGainesville Solar Energy Assets    Gainesvill...
Alternative           Industry Target #3:Energy                Alternative EnergyGainesville Biofuels Assets• Florida Cent...
Industry Target #4: Integration21stCenturyLogistics              of Industrial Design, Adv.              Manufacturing, an...
Industry Target #4: Integration21stCenturyLogistics               of Industrial Design, Adv.               Manufacturing, ...
IT &Software               Competency #1: IT and               Software Development  General Observations  Specialized IT/...
Process       Competency #2: ProcessEngineering   Engineering  General Observations  • 33 research centers and institutes ...
Biological   Competency #3: BiologicalSciences             Sciences  General Observations  • Provides foundation for UF’s ...
Advanced    Competency #4: AdvancedMaterials   Materials  General Observations  • UF’s Dept. of Materials Science and  Eng...
Clean        Innovation Driver Target #1:Technology   Clean TechnologiesGeneral Observations• In addition to Alternative E...
Smart            Innovation Driver Target #2:Infrastructure                 ‘Smart” InfrastructureGeneral Observations• Re...
Nanotechnology   Innovation Driver Target #3:                 Nanotechnologies &                 MaterialsGeneral Observat...
Advanced     Innovation Driver Target #4:Computing             Advanced ComputingGeneral Observations• Encompasses a range...
The Value Proposition: Gainesville’s    R&D Scenario    What it means to the scientific and          What is means to the ...
Linking Across Industries, Competencies,and Innovation Drivers                                Agricultural                ...
Best Practice      RegionsBenchmarking assets,visions, and long-term   operating models
Best Practice Review: Learning fromSuccess and FailureBest Practices Examined:   •   Ann Arbor, Michigan   •   Austin, Tex...
Essential Components of Successful    Benchmarks•   Broad consensus about goals and direction•   Pervasive networking amon...
Components of Successful GrowthStrategies: Linking Values to Outcomes
Case Study: Madison, Wisconsin                   Clinical                  Research              Entrepreneurial          ...
Case Study: Austin, Texas                                                 10-15                       Technology          ...
Case Study: Boulder, Colorado                                               •   Aerospace                                I...
Benchmarking Places for SparkingInnovation: Physical InfrastructureNecessary for the Discovery toDevelopment ProcessWhile ...
Interviews, Forums,   and the GACC      Retreat   What We Heardand What We Learned
Important Goals: The Output from theSteering Committee, Retreat, andForums• Create an “Irresistable Case for Change”• Crea...
Interviews, Forums, and RetreatFeedback: Our AspirationsBe a First Mover Region: no more lagging behind other regions, our...
From Vision to Action: A Framework forImplementation                  Big Idea         Big Idea       Big Idea            ...
“Big Ideas”: Transformations that    Change the Regional Economic Agenda    Stretch-goals – those opportunities that cause...
Fundamental Actions: Critical Steps for    Achieving Transformation and a    Regional Innovation Economic Model•    Action...
The Framework for Implementation
Implement, Incubate, Index…From vision – or the                                                Innovation HubGainesville I...
Framework and Implementation for               Greater Gainesville                           Innovation Advocates         ...
The Approach to Consensus Building:Implementation TeamsMany regions have had continued and proven success with the applica...
Bringing the Pieces into Alignment  Fundamental              Sectors               Competencies               Innovation  ...
The Role of the Innovation AdvocatesCatalyst for Connecting – CEOs, tech community,   larger community, passionsCreative F...
Innovation Advocates: InnovationAdvocate Agenda•   Comprised of 15-22 Civic Stewards•   Act like Civic Venture Capitalists...
Metric Reports: Measuring Success,Failure and Work To Be Done  From Silicon Valley to Greater Washington DC, from Austin t...
Communicating theInnovation Agenda      Regional  Organizational, Institutional, andPublic Sector Impact
Who Is Impacted by the InnovationGainesville agenda: Answers to beaddressed during the Advocates and HotTeam Process The C...
What Are the Impact Scenarios:              Case Study• Austin Chamber• University of Texas, St. Edwards, Austin  Communit...
Specific Impacts on the Chamber andPartners: What Does the FrameworkMean for Organizations• Membership Composition• Just-i...
Strength of Networks:The Most Vital Goal of the Framework                             Throughout the Phase 1, an          ...
Benefits to Creating an Innovation  Mindset & Framework                                                                   ...
Qualities of Today’s Regional Stewards & Civic Leaders: Innovation AdvocatesRegional visionaries who see the need for a mo...
Roles for Leadership:Connecting the Dots                             Economics & Societal:                             Qua...
Therefore What We Learned duringPhase 1 and the Framework Process  People in the room and outside the room are going to  u...
Regional TransformationRoles for Leadership             Bring People               Provide the             Together       ...
The Reason We Are Here: FromSteering Committee to InnovationAdvocatesTo intentionally and without regard to past   disagre...
A Declaration for Action:The Regional Commitment to theInnovation Agenda“ We, the participants in the 2009 Annual Retreat ...
Report Preparation and Phase 1 ProjectDeliverables: New Economy Strategies All supporting materials and deliverables may b...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Gainesville Phase 1 Final Report Printable Version Final

639 views

Published on

Innovation Gainesville (Florida)

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
639
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
10
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
6
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Gainesville Phase 1 Final Report Printable Version Final

  1. 1. Greater Gainesville Knowledge Economy Road Map:Phase One Final Report
  2. 2. Project Overview and Findings
  3. 3. Knowledge Economy Road Map Process Reports 1-3 “Scan” Literature Review Asset Inventory Innovation Data Analysis Local Input Final Report Report 4 Interviews Findings and Targets of Opportunity Recommendations (and SWOT Analysis) Advisory Groups • 2-3 Big Ideas Small • 5-7 Fundamental Forums Actions Report 5 Best Practices Review (and Benchmarking)The Gainesville Area Chamber of Commerce selected New EconomyStrategies LLC (Washington D.C., Austin Texas) to assist in the analysis,assessment and recommendation for an accelerate process to strengthenthe regional economic development process, agenda, and outcomes. NESwas selected on the basis of its success in over 100 engagements whereelements of the highly inclusive, facilitated process to bring disparateelements of scientific, technological, demographic and economic leads tonear-term implementation. NES, an innovation-focused consultancy,determined that the region could rapidly employ methods to engage variousstakeholders in the often overlooked elements of connectivity, knowledge-sharing, and a common purpose.
  4. 4. The Road Map is Driven bySix Critical Questions The Selection Committee and ultimately the Project Advisory Committee determined Six Critical Questions plaguing regional progress and success that required addressing through a Road Map:• What are growth opportunities for Gainesville/Alachua County?• What does the Chamber/business community need to do differently to promote economic growth?• What are the five largest impediments to economic development?• Where is the community support and community opposition?• What is University of Florida’s role in community and long term commitment of economic development?• How do we continue to build a world class community?
  5. 5. Requirements for Addressing the Road Map QuestionsThe Challenges and the Goals: Assess existing capacities, Existing Economic infrastructure, and assets in Drivers: opportunity areas • Biomedical R&D Measure the region’s • Renewable/alternative competitiveness in target energy industries and sub-specialties • Water-related Evaluate global trends in these technologies industries and their implication • Manufacturing (devices, for regional planning of drugs, food products, infrastructure, economic etc.) development, workforce • Retention of Student development, and marketing and Faculty as Innovators Determine what gaps exist and how/if they can be addressed Enhance partnerships and assets Inherent Key Goals: that ultimately increase the • Job creation region’s value proposition to • Corporate recruitment companies • Investment • Brand development • Commercialization 5
  6. 6. Project Focus Areas: Analysis, Assessmentand a Value Proposition for ActionKey Issues Specific ActionsComprehensive • Analyze Gainesville’s economy as a whole,analysis of identifying specific assets, funding streams,economy strengths and challengesIdentify relevant • Identify core competencies that align assets in theknowledge region with target industry clusters in order tocompetencies promote connections between civic, business and academic institutionsBenchmarking • Place Gainesville’s economy in a national andProvidence against international context- benchmarking the cityother regions against regional, national and international targetsStrategic value • Link the embedded regional knowledge into theproposition on workforce system, focusing on sponsored researchTechnology and industry partnerships as well as talent andTransfer, skills development for sustainable economicCommercialization growthAnalysis of • Target both the supply and demand sides of theGainesville’s economy to look at both established businesses,Underpinnings for along with emerging industries, clusters and firmsEconomic • Then identify a portfolio of immediate, near-, andDevelopment long-term actions necessary for a new regionalImplementation economic development and programmatic implementation approach 6
  7. 7. Project Phases: from Analysis to Alignment Phase I: Phase II: Data Analysis Innovation Networks Current Innovation Snapshot VC – 08, Patents – ’07, Identify which Dots are Critical Fed Funding – ‘06/’07 Asset Base Assessment Levels of Connectivity Inventory of Names, Programs, Facilities, and Companies Purpose of Connectivity Target Sectors Dialogues addressed by Frameworks and drill-down; drill- Connectivity: impact of connectivity • Economic • Financial Dialogues • Political addressed by • Demographic connectivity • Resource Utilization (time, reputation, money) Knowledge Identify people with talent, expertise, “Innovation Risk Assessment” experience, and their own networks Benchmarks “Cities/Regions that are connected look like this… (X, Y, Z)”The Gainesville Area Chamber and NES determined early into the projectphases that the Data Analysis, while critically important for updating and inturn drilling-down into new knowledge, must be accelerated to addressseveral barriers and limitations that had held the region back fromcompetitiveness and overall innovation output. In examining both the dataand target sectors, additional data supported the discovery of buildingstronger networks among the asset base, institutions, organizations andindividuals that drive Gainesville’s ‘innovation networks’. By examiningthese elements of Know-What and Know-How among vital scientific andtechnological drivers, NES began to assess the Know-Whom – thepowerful linkages – or frankly the lack thereof – among the people andenterprises that differentiate Gainesville’s economy from others. 7
  8. 8. Data Highlights: New facts on the uniqueness of the Gainesville economy Gainesville* Key Industry SnapshotUniversity of Florida Sponsored Research Awards Size of Bubble: 2008 Employment(in Millions) Y-axis: Location Quotient, $600 Non-Federal $583 $562 Declining, Healthcare 2008 Employment Growing, Federal Strong Cluster $494 $519 $500 Strong Cluster $470 Engineering & $458 1 $437 Design Biomedical Building & $400 $380 Construction $339 Finance $301 $300 Education Research $200 IT Prof Svcs $100 Industrial Machinery Logistics Electronics $0 Growing Declining, Weak Cluster Weak Cluster 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 0 -25% 0% 25% 50% 75%Source: UF Office of Research, 2008 Annual Report Regional Employment Growth, 2003-2008 *Gainesville = Alachua County + Gilchrist County Alachua County Patent Snapshot, 2002-7 Share of Patents (U.S. share) Breakdown of Federal Awards by Agency, 2008 $6 $6 $6 $13 (In Millions of Dollars) (38%) $13 NIH NSF $15 $127 USDA DOD (23%) (17%) $17 HRSA Education HHS Energy (6%) $29 VA NASA (13%) (3%) $32 Commerce *Other includes Environmental Technologies, Aerospace & $39 Interior Other Defense, Industrial Processes, and other miscellaneous categoriesSource: UF Office of Research, 2008 Annual Report Source: 1790 Analytics, USPTO
  9. 9. Demographic Indicators:Regional Education ExperienceEducational Attainment (% Bachelor or higher) Source: WITS (Demographics Now) This is view of how Alachua County significantly outperforms the other counties in the region in terms of educational attainment; this is a critical asset that should be better leveraged to grow and recruit companies and retain students. As was noted further in the interview and forum stages, the disparate nature from one high school to the next, one program to the next demands a closer analysis and drill-down into the work required for a county-wide standard of excellence. 9
  10. 10. Industry Overview: What is currentlydriving the regional economy? Source: Moody’s economy.comObviously the regional economy has a good spread of sectors, industriesand therefore jobs. The size of the bubble is the relative size of the regionalemployment total, and the growth to the right of the axis suggests thosesectors that are still continuing to expand, especially biomedical, research,building and construction, engineering and design. Yet, not taking intoaccount the 2009 decline nor necessary interventions to continue growthand competitiveness will suggest that the region must create its own future. 10
  11. 11. Key Sector Employment Growth:Key Sector Employment Growth:Five Years of Competitiveness by SectorEmployment Growth PatternsIn twelve sectors, the most significant patterns for growth have been inbiomedical, construction, health-care, logistics, professional services, andresearch. Of concern is the decline in information technologies due to its impacton a wide range of interdisciplinary and collaborative sector products. 1111
  12. 12. The Current Economic Climate Change in Employment, Apr. 2008 – Apr. 2009 Source: Alachua/Bradford Regional Workforce BoardSignificant employment declines across most sectors, withGainesville having overall fewer declines in most areas thanthe State of Florida suggest that recovery from the recentdownturn will require interventions and strategies thatleverage a broad spectrum or portfolio of opportunities toleverage know-what (degrees, certification) with know-how(applied technologies, market driven) 12
  13. 13. The Current Economic Climate Unemployment Rates, Apr. 2008 vs. Apr. 2009 Source: Alachua/Bradford Regional Workforce BoardUnemployment rates have risen sharply, and nearly doubledacross all geographies, though rates in the Gainesville arearemain below the Florida and U.S. average. Therefore, thetrends for effects of the economic slowdown and the potentialfor recovery appear to be more viable in the Gainesville regionthan the State as a whole. Understanding the portfolio ofemployment, skills, new enterprise opportunities and leveragingKnow-What and Know-How are vital to sustainable growth. 13
  14. 14. Federal R&D Funding:Estimates of Non-UF Funding Recipients Five years of federal funding by technology sector Five years patent sectors across both academic and private sector inventors and assignees Similar to Gainesville regional patent portfolio, two thirds of federal R&D funding in grants and contracts from federal sources, is allocated to Life Science. Other well-funded sectors include Agricultural Science, Environmental Science, and Defense. Total federal R&D funding in the region has hovered around $150 million from 2002 to 2006. 14 Source: IE360; FAADS
  15. 15. Federal Funding Recipients:A Portfolio of Private Sector Participants The overwhelming importance of the University of Florida and the Shands medical grants and contracts should not overshadow the importance of the initial and emerging needs for obtaining more industry and private sector recipients on which to create public-private partnerships for discovery, development and deployment of the next generation of new ideas, products, and commercialization opportunities.
  16. 16. Portfolio of Investments in Regional R&D Research Awards by Sponsor, 2008 (in Millions) Source: UF Office of Research, 2008 Annual ReportThe majority of the research awards come from the federalgovernment (57%), though state/local government andfoundations contribute an additional 17% and 13%, respectively.What will be essential, as state budgets continue to decline inthe long-term and federal funding shifts to additional priorities, isfor the Gainesville region to adopt a more aggressive researchagenda – an alliance among institutions and the private sector –to attract and therefore increase industry consortia and largercorporate R&D to locate side by side to the Gainesville assetbase. 16
  17. 17. Driving Innovation and Economic Growth Research Awards by Academic Unit, 2008 (in Millions) Source: UF Office of Research, 2008 Annual Report The majority of funding for research at the University of Florida goes to Life Sciences, with the Health Science Center receiving 52% and the Institute for Food and Agricultural Sciences receiving 19% in 2008. The College of Engineering received about 12%. Though not surprising given the significant focus through Shands and several Centers of Excellence, the challenge for regional innovation ‘system’ is to form a federally-funded supportive agenda with the University of Florida as well as to define other agencies and programs that should be recruited to Gainesville along similar lines of an economic attraction model for industry. 17
  18. 18. Federal Investment ‘Bets’ on Gainesville’sKnowledge Breakdown of Federal Awards by Agency, 2008 Source: UF Office of Research, 2008 Annual ReportNIH is the largest source of funding, with 39% of federal awards;NSF, USDA, and DOD receive funding of 12%, 10%, and 9%respectively. This is an impressive portfolio of federal funding. Notethis reflects just one-year’s worth in a portfolio of ten-years oftracking the federal investment – or bets – on Gainesville’s Know-What and Know-How. The focus for a regional innovation strategyshould be: increase the regional value proposition for bothacademic AND industry grants and contracts, leveraged by privatesector and philanthropic resources, and commercialized resourcesbetting on Gainesville’s capacities to convert ideas to products andservices for national and global distribution! 18
  19. 19. Specific National Institutes of HealthGainesville Investments: Indications ofFuture Opportunities Breakdown of NIH Awards, 2008 Source: NIH Top research areas for NIH funding were Internal Medicine, Dentistry, Genetics, Pathology, and Physiology. The ability to drill-down into the funding sources of grants and contracts, as well as to define potential patient, consumer, and industry focus areas of science allows a region to infer future opportunities for collaboration and commercialization. A portfolio of science awards also indicates opportunities for cross-disciplinary exchanges and the construct of teams that coordinate capabilities around emerging areas of technological application. 19
  20. 20. Converting R&D Investment into NewFirms, Products, and Jobs University of Florida Technology Transfer Income Source: UF Office of Research, 2008 Annual ReportThe University’s aggressive agenda to convert ideas into the next generation ofenterprises has resulted in not just additional income for the academic programson the campus, but as begun to increase the opportunities for entrepreneurialinterests to remain in the region and to be recruited to locate in Gainesville. Thissteady upward income model can be equated to a value proposition: the regionis open for collaboration, coordination, and alignment of the best minds leadingto products and services that solve national Grand Challenges and commonevery-day needs. 20
  21. 21. Research Findings: GainesvilleKnowledge Economy Building BlocksInnovationDriver Clean “Smart” Nanotech AdvancedBuilding Technology Infrastructure & Devices ComputingBlocksCompetencyBuilding IT & Software Process Biological AdvancedBlocks Engineer- Sciences Materials ingIndustrySector Human Agricultural Alternative 21st CenturyBuilding Life Science Life Science Energy LogisticsBlocks
  22. 22. Human Industry Target #1:Life Science Human Life ScienceGeneral BackgroundMajor sub-sectors within this industry includePharmaceuticals; Medical Devices andEquipment; and Research and Testing• Key drivers of the human life science marketcome from both the supply-side (technologicaladvances in areas like DNA sequencing andimaging technologies pave the way forpersonalized medicine) and the demand-side(aging populations and rising wealth acrossmany large developing countries is increasingthe demand for healthcare and relatedproducts)• Niche areas for Gainesville = RegenerativeHealth; Cancer; Brain Research; and Genetics 22
  23. 23. Human Industry Target #1:Life Science Human Life ScienceGainesville Cancer Assets Gainesville Brain Research/Neuroscience• UF Shands Cancer Center: Assetsone of Florida’s pre-eminentcancer treatment facilities, • McKnight Brain Institute:recognized for its nationally recognized for itsmultidisciplinary research and research on the nervousstate-of-the-art clinical system and developing andtherapies; research targets developing clinicalinclude: treatments for its diseases o Cell signaling and regulatory mechanisms • Preston A. Wells, Jr. Center o Cancer genetics and for Brain Tumor Therapy viral o Experimental • Engineering Labs like the therapeutics Computational NeuroEngineering Lab• Proton Therapy Institute: (combines principles frominnovative cancer treatment; machine learning, signalmore than 44,645 proton processing theory, andtherapy treatments delivered computationalto 1,275 patients neuroscience) and Neuroinformatics Laboratory• Clinical Trials expertise: UF isone of the sponsor • Innovative companies withorganizations for at least ten including Banyandifferent cancer-related Biomarkers (diagnostics)clinical trial programs and Optima Neurosciences (seizure detection & warning technology) 23
  24. 24. Human Industry Target #1:Life Science Human Life ScienceGainesville Genetics Assets Gainesville Regenerative Health Assets•Genetics Institute: research,education and patient-care • Center of Excellence in Regenerative Health• Interdisciplinary Center for Biotechnology: recognized forBiotechnology Research strength in research, education(specialization in gene-based and training, andsequencing) biopharmaceutical manufacturing capabilities• Powell Gene TherapyCenter: therapeutic gene • Interdisciplinary Center fordelivery Biotechnology Research: specialized research across• Gene Dynamics Laboratory four main areas - Poteomics, Genomics, Bioinformatics, and• Foundation for Applied CellomicsMolecular Evolution:interdisciplinary research • Powell Gene Therapy Centerwith focus on genetics • Successful and innovative• Innovative companies medical device companies likeincluding AGTC (Gene RTI Biologics; Exactech;therapy); also array of plant Transgeneron Therapeutics;genetics companies AxoGen 24
  25. 25. Agricultural Industry Target #2:Life Science Agricultural-based Life Sciences General Observations Major subsectors in this industry include feedstock, chemicals and fertilizer, and research and testing • Agricultural biotechnology is a key driver in this industry, which includes genetic engineering, a somewhat controversial practice in which the genetic composition of plants is altered to improve harvests, minimize resource use, or increase variety • Niche areas = food science and crop management 25
  26. 26. Agricultural Industry Target #2:Life Science Agricultural-based Life Sciences Gainesville Crop Gainesville Food Science Management Assets Assets • USDA Center for • Center for Nutrition Studies: Medical, Agricultural, specialties in Human and and Veterinary Animal Nutrition as well as Entomology: research molecular/cellular nutrition aimed at reducing or and metabolomics (with a eliminating the harm focus on genetics) caused by insects to crops, stored products, • Center for Food Distribution livestock and humans and Safety: explores issues of food quality and safety • UF/IFAS Center for throughout the distribution Aquatic and Invasive chain Plants • Center for Smell and Taste • UF’s Dept. of Agricultural and • Center for Organic Agriculture Biological Engineering • Innovative companies • Water Resources including ABC Research Research Center Corporation (food safety and testing); Biological Consulting • Companies: BioProdex Services (pathogen detection) (bioherbicides); Integrated Plant Genetics_Inc. (plant disease control) 26
  27. 27. Alternative Industry Target #3:Energy Alternative EnergyGeneral ObservationsMajor markets in this industry include solarpower, wind power, and biofuels; fuel cells alsoshows promise but remains primarily in R&Dphase• Alternative Energy is one of the fastestgrowing industries, with revenue of $116billion in 2008, up 53% from the previous year• Major opportunities with the industry inconjunction with government stimulusprograms, the largest of which is the ARRA,providing $70 billion in tax credits and directspending for clean energy and transportationprograms• Niche areas = biomass, solar energy, and fuelcells 27
  28. 28. Alternative Industry Target #3:Energy Alternative EnergyGainesville Solar Energy Assets Gainesville Fuel Cell Assets• Florida Institute for • Fuel Cell Research andSustainable Energy: specializing Training Laboratory: currentin advanced materials research projects include a fuel cellrelating to solar panels and bus demonstration and andevice physics relating to investigation of applicationsefficiency improvement for marine applications• Dept. of Electrical and • UF-DOE High TemperatureComputer Engineering: Solar Electrochemistry Center: UFDevice Research was recognized by the DOE as having one of the• Innovative UF spin-off preeminent solid oxide fuelcompanies including AZonic cell (SOFC) researchSolar (CIGS Photovoltaic Cells) programs in the countryand Sestar Technologies(polymer photovoltaic • FISE Technologymaterials) Incubator’s Prototype Development &• Proactive utilities company, Demonstration Laboratory:GRU, first in country to propose provides facilities for thea solar feed-in-tariff to promote development and design ofexpansion of solar PV systems commercial prototypes forin Gainesville; note = solar energy efficiencypower still expected to technologies and othercontribute a relatively small relevant devicesshare to Gainesville energy mix(<1% by 2013) 28
  29. 29. Alternative Industry Target #3:Energy Alternative EnergyGainesville Biofuels Assets• Florida Center forRenewable Chemicals andFuels: biofuels and expandingthe capacity of biorefineries• Bioenergy and SustainableTechnology Laboratory(BEST): environmentalbiotechnology• Biofuel Pilot Plant: serves asa platform to acceleratesuccessful commercializationof cellulosic ethanol• Innovative biofuelcompanies like VereniumCorp. (enzymes); BioEnergyInternational (biorefineries)•Gainesville RenewableEnergy Center: 100-megawatt biomass powerplant by AmericanRenewables in partnershipwith Gainesville RegionalUtilities; biomass expected togenerate 16% of electricityby 2013 29
  30. 30. Industry Target #4: Integration21stCenturyLogistics of Industrial Design, Adv. Manufacturing, and DeliveryGeneral ObservationsGainesville is home to several distribution centers aswell as several innovative start-ups:• Wal-mart Distribution Center• Dollar General Distribution Center• Performance Food Group’s Customized DistributionCenter• Florida Food Service• Streamline Numerics (advanced engineeringsoftware)• Innovative Scheduling (transportation software)Specialized training programs and facilities – Locatedin Lake City, the Banner Center for Logistics andDistribution is led by Lake City Community College,with partners from North Florida and around thestate. The Center is focused on developing technicalskills across the spectrum of 21st Century Logistics.It is home to a state-of-the-art truck drivingsimulator and its curricula development and stateindustry focus group work has led two colleges, LakeCity Community College and Polk College, to beginoffering degrees in supply chain management andlogistics. 30
  31. 31. Industry Target #4: Integration21stCenturyLogistics of Industrial Design, Adv. Manufacturing, and DeliveryGainesville Logistics Assets Supply Chain and Logistics Engineering Center: anUF has a solid base of research interdisciplinary center thatassets relating to 21st Century facilitates joint research andLogistics. Key research assets applied projects amonginclude: faculty from Engineering, Computer Science, andCenter for Applied Optimization: Business Administration injoint research and applied conjunction with industryprojects among faculty from participantsengineering, mathematics andbusiness, with applications in Center for Pavement andnetwork optimization methods, Infrastructure Materials:optimal control problems, and examination of advancedoptimization of elastic materials materials for infrastructure Bridge Software Institute:Transportation Research Center: focused on the enhancement,focused on the transportation maintenance, andplanning and operations areas, dissemination of bridgeincluding traffic model software to address thedevelopment for coordinated increasing demands on thesignalized intersections; level of transportation industryservice planning softwareapplications and level of servicefor heavy trucks 31
  32. 32. IT &Software Competency #1: IT and Software Development General Observations Specialized IT/Software research programs: High-performance Computing and Simulation (HCS) Research Laboratory; Database Systems Research Center; Computational Science and Intelligence Lab • Variety of industry-specific research programs: the Bridge Software Institute, Neuroinformatics Laboratory, Particle Transport and Distributed Computing Laboratory • Innovative Companies include Prioria (engineering and unmanned aerial systems); Chaologix (computer chips); Grooveshark (online music sharing) 32
  33. 33. Process Competency #2: ProcessEngineering Engineering General Observations • 33 research centers and institutes across 12 engineering departments including Agricultural & Biological Engineering, Chemical Engineering, Electrical and Computer Engineering, and Materials Science & Engineering • College of Engineering highly collaborative, participating in interdisciplinary projects in a variety of disciplines, including chemistry, dentistry, forest resource, geography, geology, mathematics, medicine, physics, and psychology • College of Engineering is third largest research unit at UF, receiving $108 million in 2007-8; ranked 14th among public universities in graduate engineering and 17th in undergraduate engineering 33
  34. 34. Biological Competency #3: BiologicalSciences Sciences General Observations • Provides foundation for UF’s expertise in Health/ Medicine, Agricultural Science, Environmental Science, and Alternative Energy • Nearly $400 million in research money devoted to Life Science research in 2008 (Health Science Center and IFAS), including $127 million from NIH • Basic and applied biology research across a diverse array of research centers and programs including: Center for Molecular Microbiology, Center for the Wetlands, Center for Neurobiology of Aging, Center for Structural Biology, Interdisciplinary Center for Biotechnology Research • Over 35 Life Science companies in Gainesville, the majority of which have some foundation in biology 34
  35. 35. Advanced Competency #4: AdvancedMaterials Materials General Observations • UF’s Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering recognized as among the best materials, metallurgy and ceramics departments in the nation, with 240 graduate students including 200 PhD students, and 150 undergraduates • Interdisciplinary research in biomaterials, ceramics, electronic materials, glasses, metals, minerals polymers, and composites; annual research expenditures of over $18 million • Current Research Centers/Programs include: Major Analytical Instrumentation Center; HiTEC center for studying solid oxide fuel cells and complex oxides, the Biomaterials Center; Particle Science and Technology Center; Computational Materials Science Focus Group 35
  36. 36. Clean Innovation Driver Target #1:Technology Clean TechnologiesGeneral Observations• In addition to Alternative Energytechnologies (PV and fuel cell technology),Waste Management and GreenDesign/Building are key niche areas of cleantechnology• Research assets include: Florida Center forSolid and Hazardous Waste Management;Sustainable Science and Engineering Research;Center for Surface Science and Engineering;Powell Center for Construction andEnvironment; Banner Center for Construction;UF Training, Research, Education forEnvironmental Occupations Center• Companies: Innovative Waste ConsultingServices (sustainable waste management);EnviroFlux, LLC (groundwater contaminationassessment); Hydrosphere Research (toxicitytesting and bioarray lab) SharkletTechnologies (bio-organism control surfaces);Sol-Gel Solutions (mercury removal fromwater and air) 36
  37. 37. Smart Innovation Driver Target #2:Infrastructure ‘Smart” InfrastructureGeneral Observations• Related to green building, with a focus onadvanced technologies and materials thatwill lead to safer and more efficientinfrastructure and infrastructure planning• Infrastructure Materials Group (andproposed Center for High-PerformanceInfrastructure Materials Enhancement);Software Bridge Institute; Supply Chain andLogistics Engineering Center; Center forApplied Optimization; Intelligent Design ofEfficient Architectures Lab; Center forSurface Science and Engineering• Companies: Streamline Numerics (advancedengineering software); InnovativeScheduling (transportation software) 37
  38. 38. Nanotechnology Innovation Driver Target #3: Nanotechnologies & MaterialsGeneral Observations• Nanotechnology as a driver in Human LifeScience (drug delivery and medical devices),Alternative Energy, and Electronics; globalmarket projected to double to $27 billion by2013• Environmental Nanotechnology Research;Center for Nano-Bio Sensors; EngineeringResearch Center for Particle Science &Technology; Department of Electrical andChemical Engineering Nanodevice research;Nanoscience Institute for Medical andEngineering Technology; SWAMP (Softwareand Analysis of Advanced MaterialsProcessing Center)• Companies: NanoMedex Inc. (energy-relatednanotechnology); Sinmat, Inc.(semiconductors); Nanotherapeutics(biopharmaceuticals); Applied Plasmonics(semiconductors); nRadiance LLC (flat paneldisplays) 38
  39. 39. Advanced Innovation Driver Target #4:Computing Advanced ComputingGeneral Observations• Encompasses a range of advanced applications inareas such as supercomputers, computer systems andnetworks, software and modeling and simulation.• Serves as a critical driver for both basic and appliedresearch in fields including medicine, agriculturalscience, environmental science, engineering, andcomputer science. Also a driver in business operationsin areas like data warehouses and transactionprocessing.• Industry drivers include global warming (and theneed for more sustainable “green” computing),cybersecurity (new methods for defending thecyberinfrastructure), and data storage space (toaccommodate growing demand for electronic medical,financial, and email records).• Gainesville assets include: Advanced Computing andInformation Systems Laboratory; Database SystemsResearch and Development Center; ComputationalScience and Intelligence Lab; High PerformanceComputing and Simulation Research Lab• Local companies include: Chaologix (customintegrated circuits); WiPower (wireless technology);Info Tech Inc. (consulting and network services) 39
  40. 40. The Value Proposition: Gainesville’s R&D Scenario What it means to the scientific and What is means to the technology communities? Business Community and the• As the largest recipient of federal General Public? funding in the State, UF is the de facto • At no other time in the agenda setter for a statewide network Gainesville economic of researchers and their teams – and development discussion has thus increasingly has proven its role as there been more reliance the Innovation Hub. upon the scientific and• While largely based on federal and technological output from state – therefore public investment – academic, medical, private the criticality of industry, consortia, sector, entrepreneurial philanthropic and other venue sources. investment are now must-haves for • The Knowledge Economy is scientists to exploit their findings limitless, the University and above and beyond traditional grants Shands are not going to and contacts. relocate, and the number of• Formation of national and brains graduating are a international networks that are based steady source of ideas, in Gainesville or at least tied to the products, new firms, regional thought leadership in certain expansion of physical and emerging technological opportunities real estate demand, will spark repetitive and sustainable increased banking and funding models business services.• The infrastructure – physical, virtual, • Opportunities for joining and the equipment necessary to keep traditional elements of the pace with discovery – will continue to economy with emerging demand both alumni AND a technologies, sectors and community-wide coordination. skills requires immediate attention and a game-plan.
  41. 41. Linking Across Industries, Competencies,and Innovation Drivers Agricultural Life Science Nanotech and Devices Advanced Computing Human Life Knowledge 21st Century Science Economy Logistics Roadmap Clean Technology “Smart” Infrastructure Alternative EnergyFor Gainesville to maximize its regional knowledge-base, a ‘map’ of thetargeted opportunities and specific areas of technological productdevelopment requires linking industries, competencies, and innovationdrivers towards first-to-market strategies and tactics. Further, to attract andrecruit people, investments, and value-chains of industries to Gainesville,unique communications and awareness within and beyond the region isnecessary.
  42. 42. Best Practice RegionsBenchmarking assets,visions, and long-term operating models
  43. 43. Best Practice Review: Learning fromSuccess and FailureBest Practices Examined: • Ann Arbor, Michigan • Austin, Texas • Boulder, Colorado • Huntsville, Alabama • Madison, Wisconsin • Tucson, Arizona • Providence Rhode Island NES and the Chamber defined the parameters for examining best practice regions with similar historical and current situations upon which Gainesville could learn both the successes and failures from these models of regional engagement and strategic planning. What was invaluable for the Steering Committee’s learning process was a previous visit to Madison, Wisconsin and a very willing mindset to understand how other locations had created value from the academic, entrepreneurial and innovation-based economic development assets previously under-valued or under-utilized. Selection of Best Practice communities was based on a rigorous but frankly, simple criteria: on what have some regions successfully converted their traditional asset base to become power-houses of job and wealth creation for all citizens and stakeholders?
  44. 44. Essential Components of Successful Benchmarks• Broad consensus about goals and direction• Pervasive networking among entrepreneurs, large companies, academia, and chamber/government leaders• Leadership from incubators and tech “councils” on behalf of entire community• University-community collaboration and commercialization forums• Recruitment and entrepreneurship efforts are “on the same team”• Linkages to venture capital and angel networks• Annual region-wide celebration of success and constant local PR
  45. 45. Components of Successful GrowthStrategies: Linking Values to Outcomes
  46. 46. Case Study: Madison, Wisconsin Clinical Research Entrepreneurial Development The Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation is often cited as a national best practice and the spark towards turning Madison from a typical college town into a strong technology transfer competitor. Through a process that took well over 15-20 years for its entire fruition – whereby the WARF was focused on producing returns on investment regardless if the firm or product stayed in Wisconsin, much less Madison, – eventually the community began to shape its agenda towards becoming the first-choice of scientific, technological and entrepreneurial output. Simply, knowledge will go wherever it finds a hospitable environment for investment, resources, facilities, policies, and supply of additional brainpower. Until Madison itself could make that value proposition to the University leadership and alumni leading WARF, overwhelming numbers of lost opportunities went to locations outside of Wisconsin. Eventually the community and the state created the programs, teams, and the facilities to host commercialization, testing and evaluation, and product manufacturing.
  47. 47. Case Study: Austin, Texas 10-15 Technology California Recruitment Marketing Trips University of Texas Sustainable Environment M Entrepreneurial Opportunity C Development Austin $15-20 M / C 5 yearsThe sleepy college town by the lakes of Central Texas was always a pride ofsports fans and alumni. All the while, various engineering and technologicalactivities happened independent and off-campus from the majority of whatwas housed on the original ‘forty-acres’. A combination of corporate decisions(IBM releasing over 700 contractors from five year agreements) and thedetermination by far-sighted alumni to expand chemical engineering intocomputational engineering sparked a series of now familiar and highlypublicized strategies for the recruitment of both a federally-funded and anindustry consortia (MCC and Sematech) as well as the formation of civicdriven recruitment and attraction agendas. Further, Austin’s long-standingenvironmental liberalism became an asset once agreement was reached tofind balance on policies, regulations, and land-use. Quality of life became apart of the communications strategy for the New Economy.
  48. 48. Case Study: Boulder, Colorado • Aerospace Industry • Clean Energy Transformation • Electronics • Biotech Sustainable Development Growth Management PlanThe Colorado School of Mines – well over 100 plus years old – has providedthe nation with a steady stream of engineering talent linked to all areas ofenergy, minerals extraction, and manufacturing. And yet, very little of theactual industrial activities occur directly in Boulder’s backyard! The naturalgas phenomena of the 1970s-1980s provided the basis for additionalinvestment by the University in the recruitment of federal and private sectorresearch collaborations, along with new targeted programs in computationalsciences, IT, materials, and process engineering. Eventually, opening itsdoors to industry sectors not currently in Colorado, such as aerospace andbiotechnology ,allowed regional interests to coordinate the appropriateinfrastructure for partnering among government-industry-academia in whatare now widely respected programs for innovation. And yet, Boulder hasmaintained its natural ‘outdoors spirit’ by ensuring a well-coordinated growthmanagement plan with business and civic leaders.
  49. 49. Benchmarking Places for SparkingInnovation: Physical InfrastructureNecessary for the Discovery toDevelopment ProcessWhile the soft-side to the strategies in the Best Practice Regions wereidentified (e.g. increased collaboration, communications, strategic planning),eventually all discussions lead to housing innovation. Knowledge requireshomes for both increasing the interactions among scientific, technological,entrepreneurial and investment interests, as well as situating the expensivelaboratory and equipment facilities next to discovery and development. Theconcept of Gainesville as an Innovation Hub – with the conversion of theAGH property to the broader context of connecting GTEC, existing andunder-utilized buildings, and the Work-Live-Learn-Play framework - all havebecome necessary and vital parts of the regional Road Map.The necessary forums, roundtables, and one-on-one discussions underwayin Gainesville for a corridor or hub that is well-considered, designed, anddriven by a progressive public-private partnership signals the regionalcapacity to meet and exceed the Best Practices and Benchmarked lessons.
  50. 50. Interviews, Forums, and the GACC Retreat What We Heardand What We Learned
  51. 51. Important Goals: The Output from theSteering Committee, Retreat, andForums• Create an “Irresistable Case for Change”• Create THE Regional ‘Table’ to Define Our Work, Connect Our People and Complete Our Tasks• Demand Participation at THE Table by Key Organization and Institutional Leaders and in return establish a Quid Pro Quo• Fundamentally Evolve the Community and Regional Economic and Workforce Development Scenario• Pursue Excellence in Public Sector Partnerships, Responsiveness and Policies• Tackle Long-Standing Barriers to Progress through Collaboration, Coordination and Alignment of Missions and Intent
  52. 52. Interviews, Forums, and RetreatFeedback: Our AspirationsBe a First Mover Region: no more lagging behind other regions, our ownexcuses, and leaving the responsibility to someone else in the region todo the heavy-liftingThe Brand is the Doing not the Slogan – Our Message Must be We GetThings Done: we need to communicate about our significant asset base,tell our story broader and wider, and focus on what we have done noton what we are going to do!Who IS Gainesville’s Customer? Who are we targeting with our story,our message, our efforts? – unless the Chamber, the University, the Cityand County are explicitly clear on our customers and their needs, we failto communicate what kind of community and region we are going to betoday and for the next generations.Past Pillars of Agriculture, Tourism, Real Estate, and Construction –ensure that these are brought along into the Knowledge Economy – allfirms and individuals must connect to the transformation of the regionaleconomic value proposition, and all citizens must identify where theirgoals and aspirations fit into the innovation agendaEmbed Innovative Thinking in Traditional Activities – Legal, Accounting,Business Services – the innovation agenda cannot be silos of impact andopportunity, and therefore we must find ways to innovate everysituation, institution, organizationConstantly Inventory Our Capabilities – we have only just begun toidentify strengths, capabilities, our networks and relationships, andtherefore we must make completing the inventory a constant and on-going project of our efforts
  53. 53. From Vision to Action: A Framework forImplementation Big Idea Big Idea Big Idea #1 #2 #3 Regional Transformation Fundamental Fundamental Fundamental Fundamental Action #1 Action #2 Action #3 Action #4The impatience of the Steering Committee coupled with the enthusiasm bythe Gainesville Area Chamber of Commerce staff for progress on anaccelerated timeline drove the commitment to move from Vision to Action,from generalized themes to more practical and measurable results. Thoughapproaching regional economic development in a new way under a newframework often takes time on the execution, the civic-business-academic-entrepreneurial leaders of the Steering Committee encouraged thetransition from the theoretical to the applied.Yet, the region had struggled in the past with several reports, strategies,and plans that while well written, remained on the shelf waiting forimplementation. Therefore, participants and supporters sought to avoid thetypical report with hundreds of recommendations, and agreed to define 5-7opportunities that would address the original questions as well as push theregional innovation capacity forward. And thus a framework was designedto both accelerate the region while filling gaps in previous executionweaknesses and failures.
  54. 54. “Big Ideas”: Transformations that Change the Regional Economic Agenda Stretch-goals – those opportunities that cause the region to advance a set of important national and global scenarios – led NES to define three Big Ideas that if executed would transform the assets, individuals and overarching economic underpinnings for the future of regional growth. Based on the data-sets, the assets on and off the campus, and general feedback towards unique opportunities for Gainesville to distinguish itself from other innovation-focused communities, the following three stretch-goals were developed. But to ensure the successful implementation, a set of specific Fundamental Actions are critical and can no longer be overlooked.• Big Idea #1: Gainesville becomes a nationally-ranked and benchmarked region as a "Catalyzing Innovation in the 21st Century" Model• Big Idea #2: Gainesville becomes a National Hub for Regenerative Health Sciences (pharmaceuticals, biologics, devices, training, and non-invasive treatments)• Big Idea #3: Gainesville becomes a National Node for Sustainable Design-Build-Maintain Green Infrastructure (materials, IT, engineering, alternative energy, and building/design)
  55. 55. Fundamental Actions: Critical Steps for Achieving Transformation and a Regional Innovation Economic Model• Action #1: Support Mentors, Bridge-Builders and Innovation Leadership to spark regional communications and connectivity• Action#2: Invest in Regional Youth and Student Innovators as Gainesvilles pathway to prosperity (focusing on awareness, training, employment, certification)• Action#3: Leverage Public-Private Partnership for Regional Innovation (focusing on resource planning, infrastructure, and leveraged funding)• Action #4: Brand Gainesvilles innovation capacity and use innovation-based economic development to attract, expand, grow, and diversify the region’s Knowledge Economy
  56. 56. The Framework for Implementation
  57. 57. Implement, Incubate, Index…From vision – or the Innovation HubGainesville InnovationScenario – to specific actions, End thechampions, roles and duties Implement Anonymityof organizations and Immediate Agendasponsors, and ultimately the Actions Campaign forreporting on success and Sensibleprogress. A number of Growthsuggested tactics and actionsteps have already emergedamong the 100+ individualsproviding feedback and ideas. Incubate Human New Capital/Pathway to Prosperity Initiatives Regional Shared Development/ Scenario Transportation Goals Alignment Measure Regional Regional Performance Progress Index
  58. 58. Framework and Implementation for Greater Gainesville Innovation Advocates “Innovate Regional Innovation “Hot Teams” Gainesville” Authority Team • 15-20 Leadership Team 4 • Design the Team members 1 “infrastructure plan” • Civic Investors Team • RFP issued to (Local/State/Federal 3 National consultants/ Philanthropic/Corp) developer • Manage commun- • Funding ications and metrics Team mechanisms (bonds, with general public 2 grants, contracts) • Respond to Hot Teams’ plans and implementation • 10-12 people directly engaged with drafting the plan(s) 5858
  59. 59. The Approach to Consensus Building:Implementation TeamsMany regions have had continued and proven success with the application of an“implementation team” process, consisting of a advisory group with 15-25leaders from business, academia, government, and various supportinginstitutions that are committed to change, and focused on leveraging criticalfederal, state and regional resources in areas with the most likelihood of success.The chart below depicts the general work plan for the Hot Teams that will do thebusiness plan vetting, preparation and presentation to the Innovation Advocates. Finish Start Date Date Advocates’ Define the Form Business Finalize & member Opportunities Plans Execute organizations •Select priorities •Gain implements •Orient team •Identify consensus on members resources/ each element of •Define desired timeframes plans Non- Outcomes •Identify cross- Advocates •Select •Present strategic cutting business performance and social issues member org. Recommendations metrics implements •Begin prioritization •Finalize implementation strategy Cross- cutting partnership implements Interim Meeting Assignments Implementation Teams present business plans Innovation Advocates, operating like a Civic Venture Capital team. Page 59
  60. 60. Bringing the Pieces into Alignment Fundamental Sectors Competencies Innovation Actions DriversConnectivity Cluster oriented: Interdisciplinary Accelerate the inclusive of core, knowledge: focused Discovery- direct and indirect on linking the Know- Development- firms, services, and What and How with Deployment in Clean individuals the Know-Whom Tech, Smart Infrastructure, Nano- Devices, Advanced ComputingTalent Development Target several Baseline skills Link UF, Shands, employment necessary to achieve Santa Fe and private scenarios within a competitive levels of sector resources to sector through Know-What for all ‘Just-in-Time’ awareness with youths and students application – Know parents, K-12, faith- across sectors & How in new based institutions, drivers technologies, clubs and forums products, toolsPartners for Specific and unique New ways of doing Procurement testInnovation infrastructure business through beds in unique required within the tested but unique opportunities for sector(s) based on partnerships around clean technologies, near-term demands investment, leverage smart infrastructure, for growth of manpower, ideas and advanced computingStorytellers General positioning of “Brains over Bricks” – Message: global Gainesville vs. Florida, we have the ease of leader in specific and SE United States, access due to vital targeted products Nationally, and networks, workforce, and services for the Globally – who needs and public partners. 21st century. What to be recruited to the What top students, vendor supplier regional sectors? top grads, top PHds, chains are critical to top executives should be founded or we jointly recruit? recruited here?
  61. 61. The Role of the Innovation AdvocatesCatalyst for Connecting – CEOs, tech community, larger community, passionsCreative Force for Innovation – leveraging assets, institutions, community, entrepreneursFacilitate New Roles – heroism, stakeholders, new philanthropy, creative civicsEngage Networks – linking existing and emerging leaders first then organizations/ institutions, move on Internet time, collaborative forum for the region using entrepreneurial mindset
  62. 62. Innovation Advocates: InnovationAdvocate Agenda• Comprised of 15-22 Civic Stewards• Act like Civic Venture Capitalists – invest time, reputation and monies into those actions that produce the MOST CRITICAL OUTCOMES• Breakdown barriers and resistance to transformation• Form Hot Teams on and around key projects• Produce Annual Performance Report• Unabashedly FOCUSED ON RESULTS aligned and coordinated among several organizations, institutions, and entities• Consistently advancing IMPLEMENTATION OF BIG IDEAS• The renew the cycle of identification, prioritization and investment of resources
  63. 63. Metric Reports: Measuring Success,Failure and Work To Be Done From Silicon Valley to Greater Washington DC, from Austin to Chicago….leading regions produce annual metrics and performance reports based on critical factors for success, the recognition of failure or remaining work to be done, and the opportunities to celebrate progress in specific metrics and activities. The Innovation Advocates should create an annual progress report after one year, but should also deliver a 120- 120- 150 day Phase 2 report to the community on its findings, recommendations, and completed work.
  64. 64. Communicating theInnovation Agenda Regional Organizational, Institutional, andPublic Sector Impact
  65. 65. Who Is Impacted by the InnovationGainesville agenda: Answers to beaddressed during the Advocates and HotTeam Process The Chamber The CEO The University The Community College The Technology & Innovation Community The City and County Governments The K-12 Public Education & The And then how do Workforce Systems we…? Business Services, Financial & Banking, Real Estate Organize for results The Convention, Visitors, and Communicate our goals, Tourists Interests aspirations and outcomes The Small Business Community Fundraise from a variety of Transportation Interests sources and new sponsors Philanthropy and Non-Profits Measure our work and output Citizens – from Youth to Parents, Taxpayer to Community Provider Re-Engage people often tired Re- from the process or new individuals to our community Sustain Short-Term Success and Short- Long- Long-term Victories
  66. 66. What Are the Impact Scenarios: Case Study• Austin Chamber• University of Texas, St. Edwards, Austin Community College, the High Schools• Austin 360 Summit• Austin Area Research Organization (AARO)• City of Austin and Travis County Economic Development• Lower Colorado River Authority• Austin Technology Incubator & The IC2 Institute• Austin Angels Network and Austin Ventures• Austin American Statesman (Newspaper)• State Government, Governor’s Office, Department of Commerce
  67. 67. Specific Impacts on the Chamber andPartners: What Does the FrameworkMean for Organizations• Membership Composition• Just-in-Time Responsive Teams• Ladders for Leadership• Project Funding Partnerships• Off-the-Record Discussions• Public Policy and Engagement with Elected Officials• Fun, Economic Development Campaigns, Victories, Celebrations
  68. 68. Strength of Networks:The Most Vital Goal of the Framework Throughout the Phase 1, an overwhelming majority of participants identified THE one weakness to the Gainesville regional scenario: few if any strong networks among key innovators, entrepreneurs, organizations, institutions, and individuals that would power the agenda for increased familiarity and trust. Informal groups and forums suggested that unless and until Gainesville’s networks could be Regions that go from strengthened around the Big ‘Good to Great’ are Ideas and Fundamental ones that unify goals and aspirations by Actions, then little progress leveraging networks of would be made. This people and minds challenge – strengthening towards highest networks – has received the common denominator outcomes. In turn, most attention and should transparency of those be THE measure of overall networks – sometime success by the Innovation benefiting society and Advocate: does each Hot larger community, sometimes benefiting Team plan advance stronger business and trust, partnerships, and enterprise bottom-lines unique networks locally and – are both practical and globally. appropriate results.
  69. 69. Benefits to Creating an Innovation Mindset & Framework •Crystallizing the unique• Incentivizing opportunities in Greater researchers, Gainesville for technologists, and entrepreneurial and risk- market-makers to taking behavior –increase collaborate in real-time commercialization, sector for near-term results growth Creation of Ideas Formation of New Products (Research & and Services Discovery) (Start-Ups) Mature Global Brands and Growth of People Recognition and Enterprises (Stable & (You Must be Sustainable Present to Win in Impact)•Trumpeting Gainesville’s Gainesville!) •Facilitating Gainesville Innovation Framework for community members to global partnering, ‘reach-stretch-achieve’ collaboration, and as a people investing
  70. 70. Qualities of Today’s Regional Stewards & Civic Leaders: Innovation AdvocatesRegional visionaries who see the need for a more integratedregional approach to transform the regionBoundary-crossers who see the need to build alliances acrosstraditional organizations and jurisdictions to address regionalproblemsCivic entrepreneurs who apply the same entrepreneurialspirit to solving regional challenges that businessentrepreneurs apply in building businessesCommitted leaders who have a long-term perspective andunderstand the need to make things better for the nextgenerationTherefore, the Innovation Advocates should examine how toleverage their networks and ultimately the largest forum –Gator Nation – internally to Gainesville, and then globally. Source: Alliance for Regional Leadership: Leadership Forum (May 2000)
  71. 71. Roles for Leadership:Connecting the Dots Economics & Societal: Quality of Life Workforce Infrastructure Transportation Academic: Incentives Private Sector: Pharmacy Recruit-Attract Internal Research Engineering Health Care Collaborative Science Computational Science Market Analysis Biology Embedded Expertise Physics & Math Mentoring The Regional Glue Recruit-Attract Molecular Science Electronics Innovation Resources: Venture Capital Civic/ Philanthropic: IP Knowledge Leadership Pool Management Expertise Resources Know-Who Networks Hold Feet to Fire Global Linkages Glue for Integration
  72. 72. Therefore What We Learned duringPhase 1 and the Framework Process People in the room and outside the room are going to understand, be comfortable and engage at various stages and levels – and that is appropriate. There are many stages to join the process and to engage other individuals on the implementation teams (subject matter experts, execution of the programs, and resources providers) It might be very clear to some, fuzzy to others – stick at the work required today because its too important to the competitiveness of our region, the lives of our citizens, and the place we call Gainesville! Disagreement is okay as well – there are several paths to the top of the mountain we are climbing. Part of the Hot Team process is to hammer out the potential and viable paths, prioritize which paths to take now or in the future, and then to reach consensus on the implementation. Our focus is FORWARD, FORWARD, FORWARD. We need to put the past behind us, stop the blame game, and turn the page to focusing attention on the Innovation Gainesville value proposition. And thus, our intentions are clear and our Scenario for the Future is sound. We must find roles, opportunities, and recognition for all types of leadership.
  73. 73. Regional TransformationRoles for Leadership Bring People Provide the Together Resources • Facilitator • Funder • Bridge Builder • Fundraiser • Arbitrator • Lobbyist •Honest Broker • Investor • Synergizer • Networker • Coach Help People Look at Issues in New Provide the Spark Ways • Catalyst • Truth-teller • Initiator Set the Pace •Transcender • Motivator with New Ideas • Educator • Energizer • Visionary • Globalist • Persuader • Risk-taker • Evangelist • Pacesetter • Innovator • ZealotThe Innovation Advocates and the Hot Teams seek to identifyindividuals with these characteristics, and then join with subjectmatter experts and the larger community in engaging those thataspire to create an Innovation Gainesville scenario and future forthe citizens of the region. While not every individual can be on theAdvocates or Hot Teams, the initiatives should seek to identifyadditional input, actions for a broader set of stakeholders in theirown respective organizations or institutions, and pathways forinvolvement in the various projects surfacing during the Phase 2.
  74. 74. The Reason We Are Here: FromSteering Committee to InnovationAdvocatesTo intentionally and without regard to past disagreements take the necessary steps towards making Gainesville a city and region for innovation in the economy, in our community and in our citizens’ aspirations for the futureTo create that future rather than having it placed upon us by outside conditions or external definitionTo form the teams, the connections, and the collaborative models so as to get past reports, analysis, and research to the doingTo pursue to our fullest measure the leadership, resources, and commitment or passion from all corners of the community from those that are ready to act, take risk, and to celebrate success
  75. 75. A Declaration for Action:The Regional Commitment to theInnovation Agenda“ We, the participants in the 2009 Annual Retreat and the Road Map Advisory Committee, have concluded that it is our time, our moment as a community and a region to establish an Innovation Agenda for Transforming the Future of Greater Gainesville.We have defined our aspirations, expectations, and most importantly the action steps that are necessary to ensure successful implementation in the immediate and long- term, and thus have established an Innovation Agenda as the foundation upon which we will collaborate, align, and complete our work.We commit our individual and collective energies, resources, and our reputations on one simple principle: to be a 21st Century Global and National Innovation Hub. And by assuming such a course of action, we commit to current and future generations to identify, pursue and obtain economic opportunity for all our citizens, youth and students”.
  76. 76. Report Preparation and Phase 1 ProjectDeliverables: New Economy Strategies All supporting materials and deliverables may be found on the Gainesville Area Chamber of Commerce website. Copies can also be requested from the Chamber directly.

×