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Ehrenfeld oslo final v3 builds (optimized)

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Ehrenfeld oslo final v3 builds (optimized)

  1. 1. © John Ehrenfeld 2017 1 Flourishing Lives in Another World RSD6 Oslo, October 2017 John Ehrenfeld 1 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 2 2-1 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 2 Warning This presentation contains some very radical ideas. You may have to suspend your current beliefs about how the world works. I promise you the story you are about to hear has the power to transform the world. 2-2 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 2 I will be calling on, for me, a stunning model of the brain that explains much about why we have lost our way, but, also, offers a model for how to recover. I will get to it shortly, but offer a few clues about it on the way. 2-3 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 3 3-1 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 There’s No Time to Lose 3 Modernity is showing signs of breakdown in the form of normative failures and growing negative unintended consequences: Growing stresses on the earth (unsustainability) Social unrest and disaffection Polarization and stalemate Failures of modernist dreams: progress, equality, freedom, opportunity, rights… Empty metrics and slogans, like sustainability Policy failures Add your own observations 3-2
  2. 2. © John Ehrenfeld 2017 4 4-1 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 Sustainability is an empty word, devoid of meaning without a reference to something [to sustain]. “Sustainability” Isn’t Working (and Can’t) 4 4-2 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 Sustainability is an empty word, devoid of meaning without a reference to something [to sustain]. The implicit reference of sustainability i s g r o w t h , a r e m n a n t o f t h e Brundtland report. “Sustainability” Isn’t Working (and Can’t) 4 4-3 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 Sustainability is an empty word, devoid of meaning without a reference to something [to sustain]. The implicit reference of sustainability i s g r o w t h , a r e m n a n t o f t h e Brundtland report. But growth is, itself, a big part of the problem. “Sustainability” Isn’t Working (and Can’t) 4 4-4 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 Ergo, we need a different, new vision to propel us into the future. “Sustainability” Isn’t Working (and Can’t) 4 4-5 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 5 5-1
  3. 3. © John Ehrenfeld 2017 Flourishing is intrinsic to life. 5 Flourishing Is the Proper Guiding Vision for Human Existence. 5-2 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 Flourishing captures the images and aspirations of those seeking to preserve and heal the Planet and its inhabitants. 5 Flourishing Is the Proper Guiding Vision for Human Existence. 5-3 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 6 6-1 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 Life is an emergent property of the cosmos. It is also a miracle, defined as: “any event, the occurrence of which is so radically impossible as to be completely unbelievable.” (Loyal Rue) 6 Flourishing Arises from the Purposefulness of Life. 6-2 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 6 Living is a process of constant conservation or self-reproduction. Living organisms express the emergent quality of “viability.” Thus, living has a directionality or teleology. Flourishing Arises from the Purposefulness of Life. 6-3 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 7 7-1
  4. 4. © John Ehrenfeld 2017 The structure of an organism continually changes through coherent interactions with the external world, all the while maintaining its organization. Autopoiesis: 
 The Conservative Process of Life 7 7-2 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 Action in the present is determined by the structure that has been created by the past. Autopoiesis: 
 The Conservative Process of Life 7 7-3 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 Autopoiesis: 
 The Conservative Process of Life 7 In humans, the brain is the heart of the autopoietic structure, changing with experience, and determining action in the next moment. 7-4 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 8 8-1 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 Non-human organisms’ potential is determined solely by their genes. F l o u r i s h i n g : T h e Realization of an Organism’s Potential. 8 8-2 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 H u m a n s ’ p o t e n t i a l i s determined by a combination of genes and connections to the actual world. F l o u r i s h i n g : T h e Realization of an Organism’s Potential. 8 8-3
  5. 5. © John Ehrenfeld 2017 9 9-1 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 9 Existential relates to the actual experience of living. H u m a n s E x h i b i t “Existential,” as well as Biological, Potential. 9-2 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 9 H u m a n s E x h i b i t “Existential,” as well as Biological, Potential. Following Rue, I divide existential potential into two aspects: p e r s o n a l w h o l e n e s s a n d institutional coherence. 9-3 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 10 10-1 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 Personal wholeness is a measure of the fullness of the expression of one’s unique, historical “self,” as exhibited in action. 10 P e r s o n a l W h o l e n e s s (Authenticity) 10-2 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 Personal wholeness entails authentic actions — actions that are “owned” by the actor. 10 P e r s o n a l W h o l e n e s s (Authenticity) 10-3
  6. 6. © John Ehrenfeld 2017 P e r s o n a l w h o l e n e s s a r i s e s f r o m a c t i o n s originating the right-brain. 10 P e r s o n a l W h o l e n e s s (Authenticity) 10-4 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 11 11-1 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 Institutional coherence is a measure of how an individual’s actions conform to existing institutional norms. 11 Institutional Coherence
 (Undifferentiation) 11-2 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 Institutional coherence involves actions that have been shaped by past experience within institutional settings. The action is undifferentiated; there is no explicit ownership. 11 Institutional Coherence
 (Undifferentiation) 11-3 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 Institutional coherence arises from actions originating in the left-brain. 11 Institutional Coherence
 (Undifferentiation) 11-4 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 12 12-1
  7. 7. © John Ehrenfeld 2017 Like life itself, flourishing is an emergent property of living organisms. 12 Flourishing is an Emergent Quality 12-2 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 Flourishing is a possibility that can come forth when the proper systemic conditions are present. 12 Flourishing is an Emergent Quality 12-3 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 Flourishing is not the same as a material output, like wealth, that is produced by a “machine.” It cannot be quantified or managed. 12 Flourishing is an Emergent Quality 12-4 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 13 13-1 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 Biological potential: the full expression of one’s genes. All Three Elements Must Be Satisfied for Flourishing to Emerge . 13 13-2 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 E x i s t e n t i a l p o t e n t i a l : t h e f u l l expression of both personal wholeness and institutional coherence. All Three Elements Must Be Satisfied for Flourishing to Emerge . 13 13-3
  8. 8. © John Ehrenfeld 2017 14 14-1 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 14 Aliveness, creativity, playfulness, joy Love, compassion, empathy, heart Sense of place, belonging/connected Inner world at peace/at home Strong, active, empathetic relationships Authenticity, ownership of self Flow Balance Justice, fairness, equity, freedom, choice Indicators of Flourishing 14-2 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 15 15-1 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 15 Rasmussen’s 6 Points about Flourishing 1. Flourishing is an objective good. (ontological) 15-2 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 15 Rasmussen’s 6 Points about Flourishing 1. Flourishing is an objective good. (ontological) 2. Flourishing is the ultimate end of of human conduct. 15-3 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 15 Rasmussen’s 6 Points about Flourishing 1. Flourishing is an objective good. (ontological) 2. Flourishing is the ultimate end of of human conduct. 3. Flourishing is individualized and diverse. 15-4
  9. 9. © John Ehrenfeld 2017 15 Rasmussen’s 6 Points about Flourishing 1. Flourishing is an objective good. (ontological) 2. Flourishing is the ultimate end of of human conduct. 3. Flourishing is individualized and diverse. 4. Flourishing is agent-relative. 15-5 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 15 Rasmussen’s 6 Points about Flourishing 1. Flourishing is an objective good. (ontological) 2. Flourishing is the ultimate end of of human conduct. 3. Flourishing is individualized and diverse. 4. Flourishing is agent-relative. 5. Flourishing is a self-directed activity. (authentic) 15-6 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 15 Rasmussen’s 6 Points about Flourishing 1. Flourishing is an objective good. (ontological) 2. Flourishing is the ultimate end of of human conduct. 3. Flourishing is individualized and diverse. 4. Flourishing is agent-relative. 5. Flourishing is a self-directed activity. (authentic) 6. Humans are naturally social animals. (interconnected) 15-7 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 16 16-1 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 Today’s world is not working the way many would like it to. 16 Flourishing Has The Power to Create the Right Future. Current Reality 16-2 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 16 Vision Of the Future Flourishing Has The Power to Create the Right Future. Current Reality Some strong vision of a desirable future is essential to produce breakdown, reflection, critical thinking, and the replacement of current beliefs and norms/values. 16-3
  10. 10. © John Ehrenfeld 2017 16 Vision Of the Future Flourishing Has The Power to Create the Right Future. Current Reality Flourishing is that vision. It can drive the necessary transformation of modernity. 16-4 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 17 17-1 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 17 The story of Modernity (our current social paradigm) is leading us astray. We are living within institutions based on flawed beliefs and norms. The flaws can be traced to the way we hold reality. 17-2 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 17 Getting a better hold on reality is the first step towards construction a new social paradigm that can work for both humans and the rest of the Earth. 17-3 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 18 18-1 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 Is seeing believing (or is Descartes wrong)? 18 18-2
  11. 11. © John Ehrenfeld 2017 Is seeing believing (or is Descartes wrong)? 18 In the next few slides, I am going to take you through a model of the brain, based on the work of Iain McGilchrist, that seems to explain Chaplin’s mask and other important features of human consciousness and behavior. 18-3 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 19 19-1 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 19 The Divided Brain Model of Iain McGilchrist W e b r i n g a b o u t a w o r l d i n consciousness that is partly what is given, and partly what we bring, something that comes into being through this particular conjunction and no other. And the key to this is the kind of attention we pay to the world. Iain McGilchrist: The Master and his Emissary 19-2 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 19 The Divided Brain Model of Iain McGilchrist The crux of McGilchrist’s model is that each hemisphere of the brain 1) pays attention to the outside differently, 2) displays a different world on the inside, and 3) thus, empowers a different actor. We are schizoid, but not crazy. Our individual character and that of the culture depend on which hemisphere dominates. 19-3 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 20 20-1 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 Nature of Attention Focused Rigid Contained Grasping Enables control and specificity Limits creativity 20 The Left Brain-hemisphere World 20-2
  12. 12. © John Ehrenfeld 2017 Sense-making mechanisms Knowing Abstraction Division/Categorization Denotative language/symbols Self-referencing Re-presentation as ideas 20 The Left Brain-hemisphere World 20-3 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 Worldly Nature—Overall Re-presentation of the past Meaningless Known Lifeless Closed Static Mechanistic Predictable Impersonal 20 The Left Brain-hemisphere World 20-4 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 Worldly Nature—Parts Fixed Isolated Decontextualized Explicit properties Disembodied in space and time Generalized Institutional facts 20 The Left Brain-hemisphere World 20-5 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 Nature of the actor Rational Homo Economicus Undifferentiated/Inauthentic Individualistic Focused on itself Self-interested Instrumental/Manipulative/Controlling Uncomfortable with uncertainty Analytic/Reductionist Emotionally neutral/negative 20 The Left Brain-hemisphere World 20-6 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 21 21-1 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 Nature of Attention Broad Flexible Persistent/sustained Vigilant/alert Exploring Opens possibility Enables creativity 21 The Right Brain-hemisphere World 21-2
  13. 13. © John Ehrenfeld 2017 Sense-making mechanisms Understanding Connotative language/symbols Metaphor Non-verbal Music Integrating Presentation as the real thing 21 The Right Brain-hemisphere World 21-3 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 Worldly Character—Overall Presentation of the now Meaningful New Living Richly contextual Open Changing/Evolving Organic Unpredictable 21 The Right Brain-hemisphere World 21-4 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 21 The Right Brain-hemisphere World Worldly Character—Parts Individual Interconnected Embedded in context Implicit meaning Incarnate/alive Instantiated/particular Brute facts 21-5 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 Nature of the actor Caring Homo caritativus Authentic Social Focused on the “Other” Empathetic Creative Comfortable with uncertainty Pragmatic Emotionally positive 21 The Right Brain-hemisphere World 21-6 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 21 The Right Brain-hemisphere World Flourishing is possible only when the right brain- hemisphere is the master, but in balance with the left. Both sides are always working. The character of the historical flow of individual and cultural experience reflects the dominant half. 21-7 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 22 22-1
  14. 14. © John Ehrenfeld 2017 Reality, how the world shows up in our brain, determines our sense of what is out there and the way we respond to it. The “Wrong” World Has Been Showing Up Lately 22 22-2 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 Reality depends on which brain hemisphere is in control of one’s attention to the world (consciousness) The “Wrong” World Has Been Showing Up Lately 22 22-3 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 Modernity reflects a massive shift from the right (master) side to the left side, producing an associated loss in our sense of connectedness with the natural and human worlds. The “Wrong” World Has Been Showing Up Lately 22 22-4 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 The result is a constellation of problems, disappointments, and unintended consequences that cast doubt on the sustainability of the modern world. The “Wrong” World Has Been Showing Up Lately 22 22-5 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 23 23-1 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 The Left-brain World of GDP Primary societal goal: Economic well-being. 23 23-2
  15. 15. © John Ehrenfeld 2017 The Left-brain World of GDP Primary societal goal: Economic well-being. Objective universe, composed of decontextualized abstractions. A big complicated machine. 23 23-3 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 The Left-brain World of GDP Primary societal goal: Economic well-being. Objective universe, composed of decontextualized abstractions. A big complicated machine. Science as providing certainty about the nature of the world, including human nature. 23 23-4 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 The Left-brain World of GDP Primary societal goal: Economic well-being. Objective universe, composed of decontextualized abstractions. A big complicated machine. Science as providing certainty about the nature of the world, including human nature. Technological hubris. 23 23-5 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 The Left-brain World of GDP Primary societal goal: Economic well-being. Objective universe, composed of decontextualized abstractions. A big complicated machine. Science as providing certainty about the nature of the world, including human nature. Technological hubris. Human nature: (Economic) rationality. Homo economicus. 23 23-6 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 The Left-brain World of GDP Primary societal goal: Economic well-being. Objective universe, composed of decontextualized abstractions. A big complicated machine. Science as providing certainty about the nature of the world, including human nature. Technological hubris. Human nature: (Economic) rationality. Homo economicus. Individual focus. 23 23-7 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 The Left-brain World of GDP Primary societal goal: Economic well-being. Objective universe, composed of decontextualized abstractions. A big complicated machine. Science as providing certainty about the nature of the world, including human nature. Technological hubris. Human nature: (Economic) rationality. Homo economicus. Individual focus. Freedom as economic choice. 23 23-8
  16. 16. © John Ehrenfeld 2017 24 24-1 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 The Right-brain World of Flourishing Primary societal goal: Flourishing. 24 24-2 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 The Right-brain World of Flourishing Primary societal goal: Flourishing. Subjective universe, composed of contextually interconnected parts. A garden. 24 24-3 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 The Right-brain World of Flourishing Primary societal goal: Flourishing. Subjective universe, composed of contextually interconnected parts. A garden. Pragmatism as providing understanding about the nature of the world, including human nature. 24 24-4 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 The Right-brain World of Flourishing Primary societal goal: Flourishing. Subjective universe, composed of contextually interconnected parts. A garden. Pragmatism as providing understanding about the nature of the world, including human nature. Technological realism. 24 24-5 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 The Right-brain World of Flourishing Primary societal goal: Flourishing. Subjective universe, composed of contextually interconnected parts. A garden. Pragmatism as providing understanding about the nature of the world, including human nature. Technological realism. Human nature: Caring. Homo caritativus. 24 24-6
  17. 17. © John Ehrenfeld 2017 The Right-brain World of Flourishing Primary societal goal: Flourishing. Subjective universe, composed of contextually interconnected parts. A garden. Pragmatism as providing understanding about the nature of the world, including human nature. Technological realism. Human nature: Caring. Homo caritativus. Relationships focus. 24 24-7 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 The Right-brain World of Flourishing Primary societal goal: Flourishing. Subjective universe, composed of contextually interconnected parts. A garden. Pragmatism as providing understanding about the nature of the world, including human nature. Technological realism. Human nature: Caring. Homo caritativus. Relationships focus. Freedom as existential choice. 24 24-8 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 25 25-1 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 The Divided-brain as a Design Paradigm 25 Meta-“mental” model. 25-2 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 The Divided-brain as a Design Paradigm 25 Meta-“mental” model. Uncanny correlation with many categorical oppositions merits a very hard look. Constructivism v. positivism Maturana’s (objectivity) v. objectivity Phenomenology v. Analytic philosophy Poetry v. prose Hegelian antithesis v. thesis 25-3 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 The Divided-brain as a Design Paradigm 25 Meta-“mental” model. Uncanny correlation with many categorical oppositions merits a very hard look. Constructivism v. positivism Maturana’s (objectivity) v. objectivity Phenomenology v. Analytic philosophy Poetry v. prose Hegelian antithesis v. thesis Underpins/explains societal beliefs and norms. Power is derivative of left-brain hegemony (Maturana) 25-4
  18. 18. © John Ehrenfeld 2017 The Divided-brain as a Design Paradigm 25 Meta-“mental” model. Uncanny correlation with many categorical oppositions merits a very hard look. Constructivism v. positivism Maturana’s (objectivity) v. objectivity Phenomenology v. Analytic philosophy Poetry v. prose Hegelian antithesis v. thesis Underpins/explains societal beliefs and norms. Power is derivative of left-brain hegemony (Maturana) “In this [objectivity-without- parentheses] explanatory path (left- brain), a claim of knowledge is a demand for obedience.” (Maturana) 25-5 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 The Divided-brain as a Design Paradigm 25 Meta-“mental” model. Uncanny correlation with many categorical oppositions merits a very hard look. Constructivism v. positivism Maturana’s (objectivity) v. objectivity Phenomenology v. Analytic philosophy Poetry v. prose Hegelian antithesis v. thesis Underpins/explains societal beliefs and norms. Power is derivative of left-brain hegemony (Maturana) Grounds and unifies integral learning theories. Schön’s reflective practitioner; TPS; Schaumer’s Theory U 25-6 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 The Divided-brain as a Design Paradigm 25 Meta-“mental” model. Uncanny correlation with many categorical oppositions merits a very hard look. Constructivism v. positivism Maturana’s (objectivity) v. objectivity Phenomenology v. Analytic philosophy Poetry v. prose Hegelian antithesis v. thesis Underpins/explains societal beliefs and norms. Power is derivative of left-brain hegemony (Maturana) Grounds and unifies integral learning theories. Schön’s reflective practitioner; TPS; Schaumer’s Theory U Useful in designing artifacts and institutions. 25-7 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 26 Right Left 26-1 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 26 Flourishing Depends on Restoring the Mastery of the Right-hemisphere. Right Left 26-2 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 26 Flourishing Depends on Restoring the Mastery of the Right-hemisphere. Right Left 1. Rebuild the right-hemisphere’s muscle. 26-3
  19. 19. © John Ehrenfeld 2017 26 Flourishing Depends on Restoring the Mastery of the Right-hemisphere. Right Left 1. Rebuild the right-hemisphere’s muscle. 2. Design for presencing (context- enrichment, authenticity, and empathy). 26-4 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 27 27-1 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 27 1. Rebuild the Right- hemisphere’s Muscle by Direct Action. Pragmatic inquiry and problem-solving 27-2 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 27 1. Rebuild the Right- hemisphere’s Muscle by Direct Action. Pragmatic inquiry and problem-solving Reflective practice (Schön) 27-3 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 27 1. Rebuild the Right- hemisphere’s Muscle by Direct Action. Pragmatic inquiry and problem-solving Reflective practice (Schön) Mindfulness practices 27-4 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 27 1. Rebuild the Right- hemisphere’s Muscle by Direct Action. Pragmatic inquiry and problem-solving Reflective practice (Schön) Mindfulness practices Artistic exercises 27-5
  20. 20. © John Ehrenfeld 2017 27 1. Rebuild the Right- hemisphere’s Muscle by Direct Action. Pragmatic inquiry and problem-solving Reflective practice (Schön) Mindfulness practices Artistic exercises Empathy & conversation skills-building 27-6 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 27 1. Rebuild the Right- hemisphere’s Muscle by Direct Action. Pragmatic inquiry and problem-solving Reflective practice (Schön) Mindfulness practices Artistic exercises Empathy & conversation skills-building Academic programs focused on flourishing … 27-7 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 28 28-1 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 28 Establish a Curriculum in Flourishing • FLO 101 Fundamentals of flourishing: semantic; cultural; psychological; philosophical (Ehrenfeld, Volf, Fredrickson, Rasmussen) • FLO 102 Critical studies of modern cultures (K. Polyanyi, A. Touraine) • FLO 103 Introduction to brain science (I. McGilchrist, A. Damasio, H. Maturana) • FLO 104 Human ontology (M. Heidegger, H. Maturana, J-P. Sartre, J. Searle) • FLO 105 Complex systems theory, pragmatism, adaptive management (Capra, Dewey, L. von Bertalanffy) • FLO 106 Non-neoclassical economics or the economics of empathy/care (E. F. Schumacher, J. Stiglitz, A. Sen, M. Nussbaum.) • FLO 107 Culture as a complex adaptive system (A. Giddens. R. Ackoff) • FLO 108 Critical study of technology (L. Mumford, T. Kuhn, B. Latour, S. Turkle) • FLO 201 Management of complex adaptive systems (C. S. Holling, L. Gunderson) • FLO 202 Systems thinking (P. Senge, R. Ackoff, C. Argyris/D. Schön, J. Sterman) • FLO 203 Participatory design theory (B. H. Banathy, P. Ehn, M. Kyng) • FLO 204 “Democracy” theory (J. Dewey, E. O. Wright) • FLO 205 History of the “self” (C. Grignon, B. Hood, C. Taylor) 28-2 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 29 29-1 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 Presencing is an interruption in the flow of action (breakdown) during which: 1) Attention shifts to the right-brain. 2. Design for Presencing in Artifacts and institutions. 29 29-2
  21. 21. © John Ehrenfeld 2017 Presencing is an interruption in the flow of action (breakdown) during which: 1) Attention shifts to the right-brain. 2) The immediate world shows itself. 2. Design for Presencing in Artifacts and institutions. 29 29-3 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 Presencing is an interruption in the flow of action (breakdown) during which: 1) Attention shifts to the right-brain. 2) The immediate world shows itself. 3) Focal objects and their context show up. 2. Design for Presencing in Artifacts and institutions. 29 29-4 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 Presencing is an interruption in the flow of action (breakdown) during which: 1) Attention shifts to the right-brain. 2) The immediate world shows itself. 3) Focal objects and their context show up. 4) The actor becomes connected to the scene and enters into a meaningful relationship with it. 2. Design for Presencing in Artifacts and institutions. 29 29-5 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 Presencing is an interruption in the flow of action (breakdown) during which: 1) Attention shifts to the right-brain. 2) The immediate world shows itself. 3) Focal objects and their context show up. 4) The actor becomes connected to the scene and enters into a meaningful relationship with it. 5) The authentic actor takes over. 2. Design for Presencing in Artifacts and institutions. 29 29-6 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 Presencing is an interruption in the flow of action (breakdown) during which: 1) Attention shifts to the right-brain. 2) The immediate world shows itself. 3) Focal objects and their context show up. 4) The actor becomes connected to the scene and enters into a meaningful relationship with it. 5) The authentic actor takes over. 6) The active concern and/or identity of the actor is revealed and determines the next action. 2. Design for Presencing in Artifacts and institutions. 29 29-7 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 30 30-1
  22. 22. © John Ehrenfeld 2017 30 Objects Can Be Designed to Create Presenting. Wake up! 30-2 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 30 What’s this 
 telling me? Objects Can Be Designed to Create Presenting. Wake up! 30-3 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 30 Slow down! Danger ahead. What’s this 
 telling me? Objects Can Be Designed to Create Presenting. 30-4 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 30 Slow down! Danger ahead. Objects Can Be Designed to Create Presenting. Danger?? Busy Intersection. 30-5 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 30 Slow down! Danger ahead. Objects Can Be Designed to Create Presenting. I care about others’ safety. 30-6 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 30 Slow down! Danger ahead. Objects Can Be Designed to Create Presenting. Better slow down and look around. 30-7
  23. 23. © John Ehrenfeld 2017 31 31-1 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 31 Presencing Enriches Context Creating flourishing requires an understanding of context. 31-2 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 Empathetic relationships, so important for flourishing, are context-rich. 31 Presencing Enriches Context 31-3 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 32 32-1 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 The context-rich, complex world determines the outcomes of our actions. If our design models do not accurately portray that world, outcomes will deviate from our intentions, producing failure and unintended consequences. 32 Context is Important in Any Design Process 32-2 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 Cartesian reductionist science always omits context; the menu is not the meal. Technological intermediation also tends to reduce context. 32 Context is Important in Any Design Process 32-3
  24. 24. © John Ehrenfeld 2017 33 33-1 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 Empathy requires context to understand the other’s situation. 33 Empathy is an essential element of authentic action and flourishing. 33-2 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 Mobile devices and social media have trivialized the meaning of relationships. 33 Empathy is an essential element of authentic action and flourishing. 33-3 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 “Technology is implicated in this assault on empathy.” (Sherry Turkle) 33 Empathy is an essential element of authentic action and flourishing. 33-4 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 34 34-1 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 Place can bring forth authenticity: 
 The example of Christopher Alexander. 34 The Role of Place in Flourishing 34-2
  25. 25. © John Ehrenfeld 2017 The lasting quality of place (and things) comes forth through the way we are connected to them, not how we use them. 34 The Role of Place in Flourishing 34-3 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 Alexander called the “timeless” nature of place, “Quality without a name.” Later he called it wholeness, a right-brain feature, also reflecting the contribution of place to the flourishing of those dwelling therein. 34 The Role of Place in Flourishing 34-4 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 Pattern language: Direct analogy to the connected world of the right brain. 34 The Role of Place in Flourishing 34-5 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 35 35-1 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 Watch how you use “sustainability,” and make sure you link it to flourishing. Sustainability-as-flourishing is the possibility that human and other forms of life will flourish on the Earth for generations to come. 35 Final Words: Watch Your Use of Language 35-2 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 Remember that flourishing is always a possibility; never a probability! 35 Final Words: Watch Your Use of Language 35-3
  26. 26. © John Ehrenfeld 2017 F l o u r i s h i n g m u s t become your Job #1. Start Now! 35 35-4 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 36 36-1 © John Ehrenfeld 2017 36 T h a n k s for your attention 36-2

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