The Big Picture: Creating and Using Video for Learning and Teaching

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Now that most mobile devices and quicker download speeds can handle streaming video, the possibilities to support learning are more of a reality. In this session you’ll pick up lots of hints and tips for recording your own video resources and using video with learners.

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  • What we hope to cover
  • In 1913 Thomas Edison said. ……..Yet today we’re only just grasping the use of video (or the motion picture). Why is that?Well if you look the options available to share information, instruction or a great idea with a student you had to write. That was the communication technology that was available, (it might have been different version of the technology, e-mail, website or print) but if we look at in it’s most basic form of print, we all know how the print revolution changed the world and how it allow that communication to scale. Now that most mobile devices and quicker download speeds can handle streaming video, the possibilities for using video to support learning are more of a reality. Web video has allowed a more powerful form of video to scale. A lot of human communication is non-verbal, when you watch a video you see things and pick up on things that cannot be conveyed by text alone.
  • You must stimulate, motivate educate and choose the perspective that serves your goals.
  • We will look at Jack Koumi’sframwork for producing educational videos. The framework was grounded in the BBC’s experiences of producing and evaluating videos for the open university. A full in depth description of the framework available in Designing Video and Multimedia for Open and Flexible Learning. I have tried to summaries and give some key points.This framework is not intended as a prescription. The framework is meant to be used flexibly rather than as recipe and there is no need to use all techniques mentioned in this summary or full guide.Talk through the key points on screen
  • In room task, arrange shots and choose your narration, there’s no wrong answer, and you can see how well they match up with principals.
  • In room task, arrange shots and choose your narration, there’s no wrong answer, and you can see how well they match up with principals.
  • In room task, arrange shots and choose your narration, there’s no wrong answer, and you can see how well they match up with principals.
  • In room task, arrange shots and choose your narration, there’s no wrong answer, and you can see how well they match up with principals.
  • In room task, arrange shots and choose your narration, there’s no wrong answer, and you can see how well they match up with principals.
  • In room task, arrange shots and choose your narration, there’s no wrong answer, and you can see how well they match up with principals.
  • In room task, arrange shots and choose your narration, there’s no wrong answer, and you can see how well they match up with principals.
  • In room task, arrange shots and choose your narration, there’s no wrong answer, and you can see how well they match up with principals.
  • In room task, arrange shots and choose your narration, there’s no wrong answer, and you can see how well they match up with principals.
  • In room task, arrange shots and choose your narration, there’s no wrong answer, and you can see how well they match up with principals.
  • In room task, arrange shots and choose your narration, there’s no wrong answer, and you can see how well they match up with principals.
  • Highlight some of the free tools out there that can be used for capturing and editing
  • These are great for revision or accessing when it is not possible to attend in person, the lecture is available 24/7. However, all you’ve got at the end of the day is a lecture, a passive form of learning. But that can’t take away how easy simple it is to capture a lecture.Preparation – Let the performer know exactly what you will do. Will you use a mix of video to slide, PIP or just slides and audio. Show them a past example if possible.Production – With this one there’s very little to do the quality relies on the performer.Post Production – Consider only making key part available, add value in the form of on screen prompts, questions at key points or if time permits add animation.
  • The type of teaching used by the Khan Academy – info about the Khan Academy.Allows the user to teach in greater or better detail. User learns by example and can move at their own pace. If you’re going to get involved in producing them here’s what to consider.Preparation – Make sure you know exactly what you’re gonna do, know every step, and have an instruction set or script to follow, and, before you get started know what your own voice sounds like, decide if you need to speak clearer, pronounce certain words differently etc (just be comfortable with you).Production – When you’re recording make sure you’ve closed all unnecessary programs. There’s nothing worse than an e-mail alert popping up and ruining your video, just as you’re right at the end. You can rerecord if necessary (maybe you’re in a noisy environment) but record with what we call a “scratch track” it’ll allow you to get an idea of clarity and intonation. Set your screen or window to a suitable size or resolution. Don’t record a large window if the information can be displayed in a smaller one.Post – To keep the user interested you should pose question throughout, pause for questions or link the information provided in the video to another resource.
  • The type of teaching used by the Khan Academy – info about the Khan Academy.Allows the user to teach in greater or better detail. User learns by example and can move at their own pace. If you’re going to get involved in producing them here’s what to consider.Preparation – Make sure you know exactly what you’re gonna do, know every step, and have an instruction set or script to follow, and, before you get started know what your own voice sounds like, decide if you need to speak clearer, pronounce certain words differently etc (just be comfortable with you).Production – When you’re recording make sure you’ve closed all unnecessary programs. There’s nothing worse than an e-mail alert popping up and ruining your video, just as you’re right at the end. You can rerecord if necessary (maybe you’re in a noisy environment) but record with what we call a “scratch track” it’ll allow you to get an idea of clarity and intonation. Set your screen or window to a suitable size or resolution. Don’t record a large window if the information can be displayed in a smaller one.Post – To keep the user interested you should pose question throughout, pause for questions or link the information provided in the video to another resource.
  • Leave space on one side, have the person looking off camera, almost into the space, and create some interest in the background but watch out for interfering objects. Creates a feeling of conversation.
  • These are very common on video sharing sites such as youtube and videojug. They can convey complex instructions very easily. Take the example of Origami, I’ve tried to follow instructions on paper (maybe find example), but a video can convey that information much clearer.Preparation - Determine the purpose this will inform your style or visual and narration. Production - Often it’s best to record your audio later as this will allow you to edit the sequence down and remove the wait for any long processes. However, get your narrator to talk through the process even if it’s just in discussion with you. This will help to write a script, and inform your edit. Shooting a wide or medium shot will allow people see the bigger picture or whole context and the close-ups will provide detailed information.Post – Don’t just repeat what is happening on screen add value.
  • Develops greater involvement in the issue. can be involving, both in emotional and cognitive ways, they can also be used to help people understand others, and the positions of others.Prep
  • The Big Picture: Creating and Using Video for Learning and Teaching

    1. 1. The Big Picture:Creating and Using Video for Learning and Teaching John Maguire
    2. 2. Video is not a new idea“Books will soon be obsolete in the public schools. Scholars willbe instructed through the eye. It is possible to teach every branchof human knowledge with the motion picture. “ Thomas Edison, 1913 Einstein’s theory of relativity (1923) http://youtu.be/nb7GzyUemO0
    3. 3. Video is not a new idea McGraw-Hill (1963) http://youtu.be/f_RAi3XAPhA
    4. 4. Video PedagogyDesigning Video and Multimedia for Open and Flexible Learning – Jack Koumi (2006)Make them 1. The Hook Shot:want to know (capture their attention and sustain Shock close-up of a moist human brain. interest) Narration: This is a real human brain.Tell them what 2. Signpost Shot:you will do (information on the purpose of the video) Four monkeys eating Narration: Lets concentrate on social behaviorDo it 3. Encourage attentive viewing Invite viewers to guess what willpedagogically (Pose questions, Encourage prediction) happen next. Even rhetorical questions elicit judgments and viewers focus attention. 4. Enable construction of knowledge Do not provide literal narration of what (Don’t duplicate visual with narration, is happening on screen (this will add Pause commentary for contemplation) value and information).
    5. 5. Video PedagogyDesigning Video and Multimedia for Open and Flexible Learning – Jack Koumi (2006)Do it 5. Sensitise Use appropriate musicpedagogically (Create receptive viewers) Signal a change of topic Use a consistent style Conform to rules of video 6. Elucidate Use short sentences, Speak (Make the story clear) clearly, Arrange objects in shot, direct the learners attention. 7. Reinforce Repeat, compare and contrast, choose (Repeat concept) a shot that amplifies rather than accompanies the words.Tell them what 8. Conclude Recapitulate, Summarise, End Chapteryou have done (consolidate the information and signal the end)
    6. 6. The perfect cuppa A On average we drink 120 million cups of tea each day in the UK. Thats two cups of tea for every man, woman and child, every single day. B The perfect cup of tea is completely down to the individual.
    7. 7. The perfect cuppa A There are a few steps to follow to make your perfect cup of tea. B This video covers the steps, and decisions, required to make the perfect cup of tea. C If you were making a cup of tea what would you do?
    8. 8. The perfect cuppa A Add water to the kettle until you have the correct amount for one cup. B Never use distilled or previously boiled water. The more oxygen in your water the better the tea will taste. C Add water to the kettle
    9. 9. The perfect cuppa A Turn on the kettle and wait for it to boil. B Bring your water to the boil.
    10. 10. The perfect cuppa
    11. 11. The perfect cuppa A Place your tea bag in the cup. B Some people believe adding milk before the hot water is best, others feel the tea brews better alone in the hot water. C Fill the cup 4/5ths of the way with the hot water, leaving room for milk. C Pour water from the kettle into the cup.6. Elucidate Use short sentences, Speak(Make the story clear) clearly, Arrange objects in shot, direct the learners attention.
    12. 12. The perfect cuppa A Place your tea bag in the cup. B Some people believe adding milk before the hot water is best, others feel the tea brews better alone in the hot water. C Fill the cup 4/5ths of the way with the hot water, leaving room for milk. D Pour water from the kettle into the cup.4. Enable construction of knowledge Do not provide literal narration of what is(Don’t duplicate visual with narration, happening on screen (this will add valuePause commentary for contemplation) and information).
    13. 13. The perfect cuppa A Remove the tea bag. B Remove the tea bag with a spoon.6. Elucidate Use short sentences, Speak(Make the story clear) clearly, Arrange objects in shot, direct the learners attention.
    14. 14. The perfect cuppa A Sit back and enjoy your cuppa. B So that’s how to make the perfect cup of tea. C You should now be able to make informed decision about the water you use, when to add milk and how long you should leave the teabag in the cup.Tell them what 8. Conclude Recapitulate, Summarise, End Chapteryou have done (consolidate the information and signal the end)
    15. 15. The perfect cuppa A Sit back and enjoy your cuppa. B So that’s how to make the perfect cup of tea. C You should now be able to make informed decision about the water you use, when to add milk and how long you should leave the teabag in the cup.7. Reinforce Repeat, compare and contrast, choose a(Repeat concept) shot that amplifies rather than accompanies the words.
    16. 16. The perfect cuppaDo it 5. Sensitise Use appropriate musicpedagogically (Create receptive viewers) Signal a change of topic Use a consistent style Conform to rules of video
    17. 17. The starter kit• Camera – iPhone – Android• Screencast – Screenr, screencast-o-matic, Cam studio• Editing – WeVideo, YouTube, imovie, moviemaker, lightworks
    18. 18. Lecture Capture• Preparation – Prepare your performer, make them feel at ease. – Decide on your shot / mix of live video and slides.• Production – Performance is key. – The value of humour, intonation, body language, cannot be underestimated.• Post Production – Addition of animation, prompts, questions at key points.
    19. 19. Animated Screencasts• Preparation – Know each step, nothing worse than a wandering mouse. – Write a script or instruction set. – Get used to your own voice.• Production – Close unnecessary programs when recording. – Record a with “scratch track”. – Record at the appropriate resolution.• Post Production – Addition of animation prompts/questions at key points. – Tie in with additional learning material
    20. 20. Interviews• Preparation – Let the interviewee know exactly what you’re looking for in the final product. – Talk them through everything that will happen in production. – Ask them to include your answer in the question• Production – Record your questions 2 or 3 times if the interviewee is nervous – Ask questions but do not react [audibly] to their answers. – Frame the shot appropriately. – Film cutaways.• Post Production – Ensure the information/dialogue is coherent.
    21. 21. Framing interviews
    22. 22. Instructional ‘How To’• Preparation – Determine the purpose. – Create a script and a storyboard/shot list.• Production – Get presenter to talk through the process as you are shooting. – Shoot a wide or medium shot and close ups.• Post Production – Add extra information with narration to keep viewers interested.
    23. 23. Simulation or ‘Role Play’• Preparation – Make all performers feel at ease. – Create a script that poses questions for the viewer. – If you can’t storyboard create a shot list.• Production – Vary your shots, shoot details or actions. – Conform to standards of video production (learn from the movies). – Ensure you have good sound.• Post Production – Don’t use too many filters or transitions (again learn from the movies). – Make the viewer work.
    24. 24. Simple rules and conventions The 180 Rule States that characters in a scene should maintain the same left/right relationship to each other. On a more basic level the camera should remain on the same of the action http://tinyurl.com/agv4lbx
    25. 25. Simple rules and conventions Learn shot types The framing of a shot helps the narrative power. Familiarise yourself with different shot type choose the one which would be suit your purpose http://tinyurl.com/blfj7qq
    26. 26. Simple rules and conventions Steady the camera The camera doesn’t have to be on a tripod but don’t move your camera too much. Carefully consider your use of zooms, pans and tilts, use them to emphasis something. http://tinyurl.com/cmqgjka The above video also contains other helpful hints and tips for shooting.
    27. 27. Presentation• Spend time introducing• Make students work while watching• Allow time for reflection• Create Extension work• Avoid stress and technical issues
    28. 28. Presentation RSCTV – Youtube from start to finish http://tinyurl.com/asenonh Youtube Teachers – Getting Started http://youtube.com/teachers Mozilla PopcornMaker Makes it easy to enhance, remix and share web video. Combine video and audio with content from the rest of the web — from text, links and maps to pictures and live feeds. https://popcorn.webmaker.org/

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