Intern report to_Rajashekhar Ballary

4,429 views

Published on

  • Be the first to comment

Intern report to_Rajashekhar Ballary

  1. 1. INTERNSHIP REPORT BHARAT VIJAY MILLS (BVM) TEXTILE DIVISIONSINTEX INDUSTRIES LIMITED. KALOL, NORTH GUJARAT. Submitted by (as fulfillment of internship)  Rajashekhar Ballary  Student, M.F.Tech (Mngnt.)  National Institute Fashion Technology  Gandhinagar, Gujarat­382007, India.  Submitted to  Vrajesh Sitwala,  Marketing Manager  SINTEX INDUSTRIES LTD.,  Textile division: BHARAT VIJAY MILLS  Near Seven Garnala, Kalol, (N.Gujarat) 382 721, INDIA
  2. 2. DEDICATED TO MY BELOVED PARENTS
  3. 3. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT First and foremost, I would like to thank my dear Parents for their trust and continuous support. I dedicate my hard work and success to them. I  would  like  to  express  my  sincere  thanks  to  Vrajesh  Sitwal,  Marketing Manager  and  Venugopal  Iyer,  Export  marketing  manager  SINTEX INDUSTRIES  LTD,  Textile  Division,  BHARAT  VIJAY  MILLS  for  their patience  and professional  guidance. I  would  like  to  express  my  sincere  thanks  to  Dr.  Mahim  Sagar  Sharma, Centre  Coordinator,  Dr.  Binaya  Bhushan  Jena.  and  Prof.    Ankush Sharma, FMS department NIFT, Gandhinagar. Last but not the least I thank all employees and the members of BVM, textile division  Sintex  Industries  ltd.  And  my  entire  friends  who  are  directly  or indirectly helped me without whose cooperation this internship report would not have been a success. I believe that this Internship has been a great learning experience to me. RAJASHEKHAR BALLARY FMS 0606  Ì
  4. 4. CERTIFICATE I  have  the  pleasure  in  certifying  that  Mr.  Rajashekhar  Ballary, Student  M.F  Tech  (Management),  is  a  bonafide  student  of  third semester  of  National  Institute  of  Fashion  Technology.  He  has successfully completed his Internship work under my supervision. I  certify  that  this  is  his  original  effort  and  respect  to  his  tremendous effort given to his Internship. Signature Vrajesh Sitwala Marketing Manager 12.07.2007  Π 4 
  5. 5. Table of Content: ACKNOWLEDGEMENT:………………………………………………………………Ì CERTIFICATE:…...…………………………………………………………………….Π CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION:..................................................................................7  1.1 Purpose: ...............................................................................................................8  1.2 Background: ........................................................................................................8  1.3 Organization Structure........................................................................................9  1.3 Terms of reference:..............................................................................................9  1.4 Objectives of Internship report:........................................................................10 CHAPTER 2: EXPORT PROCEDURE AND DOCUMENTATION: ..........................11  2.1 Preamble: ...........................................................................................................12  2.2 Preparation to enter the international marketplace: .......................................12  2.2.1 Foreign sales agents: . ...................................................................................14  2.3 Terms of payments: ...........................................................................................18  2.3.1 Open account: ...............................................................................................18  2.4 Export Documents: ............................................................................................19  2.4.1 Overseas Sales Contract:...............................................................................19  2.4.2 Invoice:.........................................................................................................19  2.4.3 Packing List: .................................................................................................19  2.4.4 Certificate of Inspection: ...............................................................................20  2.4.5 Insurance Certificate: ....................................................................................20  2.4.6 Bill of Lading: ..............................................................................................20  2.4.7 Liner Bill of Lading: .....................................................................................21  2.4.8 Charter Party Bill of Lading (Cogenbill): ......................................................21  2.4.9 Certificate of Origin: .....................................................................................21  2.4.10 Bill of Exchange: ........................................................................................21  2.4.11 Shipment Advice:........................................................................................21  2.4.12 Proforma Invoice: .......................................................................................22  2.4.13 Shipping Instructions: .................................................................................22 5 
  6. 6. 2.4.14 Insurance Declaration:.................................................................................22  2.4.15 Intimation for Inspection: ............................................................................22  2.4.16 Shipping Order:...........................................................................................23  2.4.17 Dock Receipt or Mate’s Receipt:.................................................................23  2.4.18 Application for Certificate of Origin: ..........................................................23  2.4.19 Letter to the Bank for negotiation:...............................................................23  2.4.20 Exchange control Declaration GR form (Guaranteed Receipt):....................23  2.4.21 Insurance Premium Payment Certificate:.....................................................24  2.4.22 AR 4/4 form:...............................................................................................24  2.4.23 Shipping Bill:..............................................................................................24  2.5 Incentives and Duty Drawback: .......................................................................24  2.5 Export terms of delivery:...................................................................................26  2.5.1 INCOTERMS: Terminology used by exporters:............................................26  2.5.2 The Structure of Incotrems:...........................................................................26  2.6 Steps involved in execution of export order in BVM: ......................................30 CHAPTER 3: TECHNICAL TEXTILES AND NEW PRODUCT IDENTIFICATION32  3.1 Introduction:......................................................................................................33  3.1.1 Industry Definition:.......................................................................................33  3.2 Plan to enter coated technical textile market: ..................................................35  3.2.1 Focus At Initial Stage....................................................................................35  3.2.2 Points need to consider at the time of Coating Inquiry...................................35  3.2.3 Market entry: ................................................................................................36 CONCLUSIONS: .........................................................................................................37 APPENDIX:.................................................................................................................39 REFERENCES:...........................................................................................................41 6 
  7. 7. CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION 7 
  8. 8. 1.1 Purpose: The purpose of this report is to outline objectives, process for defining steps followed in execution  of  export  and  to  identify  new  product  under  technical  textiles  (performance fabrics) where company, BVM textile division, Sintex Industries Ltd. can acquire market and perform better. All above purposes are executed while/after completion of Internship  st  th at Sintex Industries Ltd., BVM textile division Kalol, North Gujarat from 21  may to 13 of July as a process of pursuing the degree PGFMS at NIFT, Gandhinagar. 1.2 Background: Established  in  the  year  1931,  Bharat  Vijay  Mills  (BVM),  is  a  composite  textile  mill, initially operated on a very modest scale at Kalol, a town 30 Km in North of Ahmedabad, (India).  In  1956,  the  present  management,  Sintex  Industries  Limited  took over, through its  textile  division  Bharat  Vijay  Mills  Limited  (“BVM”).  Today,  BVM  is  a  vertically integrated  plant  having  its  own  spinning  to  finishing  facilities.  It  has  grown  into  50 million  US$  turnover  group  with  a  dedicated  work  force  of  1600  people  in  the  textile division. BVM has already made a total capital investment of about USD 90 million for the continuous  modernization and capacity expansion  in the  last five  years. This  year  it has  a  planned  capital  outlay  of  USD  15  million  for  this  year.  BVM  has  been  the undisputed leader in varied product mix for the last 70 years with a continuous expansion of its product range. Since last 20 years it has established a name in global market with its Yarn Dyed, Piece Dyed Shirting, Corduroy and Bottom Weight. BVM’s 80% production is  catered  to  all  the  leading  brands  of  the  world  through  direct  exports  and  indirect deemed  exports  through  garment  exporters  based  in  India.  With  the  company  well equipped with fabric design and product development services it is able to provide high level service to all the leading global brands associated with the company. BVM is also having joint venture with the Italian fabric manufacturer M/s Canclini Tessile SPA, for manufacturing and supplying high­end yarn­dyed shirting fabric. The vision and mission statement of BVM textile division Sintex Industries Ltd., are, 8 
  9. 9. Vision  To  achieve  global  presence  in  Textile  business,  through  continuous  product,  technological  innovation,  customer  orientation  and  a  focus  on  cost  effectiveness,  quality and services.  Mission  We believe in strong customer orientation. We know that the company knows one he  keeps, and we value your company.1.3 Organization Structure  Sintex Ind. Ltd.  Textile Div.  Plastic Div.  Corporate  Div.  Admin  Purchase  Operations  Finance &  Sales &  &  Accounts  Marketing Stores 1.3 Terms of reference: This section includes who asked to write the report and when it should be submitted. As per  the  guidance/syllabus  of  Fashion  Management  department  of  National  Institute Fashion Technology (NIFT) Gandhinagar, it is take industrial training and prepare report  st on  the  company.    Hence  summer  internship  has  been  successfully  completed  from  21  th May  2007  to  13  July  2007  in  BVM  textile  division  Sintex  Industries  Ltd.,  Kalol, Gujarat. Efforts are made to examine existing institutional framework of exports and new product  market  under  coated  Technical  textiles.  The  report  has  been  submitted  to  the  th department on date 11  July 12, 2007.  9 
  10. 10. 1.4 Objectives of Internship report: In order to deliver above said purposes the following objectives have been set and are executed while/after completion of Internship.  Learning Objective 1: To learn the export procedures and documentations followed.  Learning Objective 2: Examine, become familiar with the present Export procedures,  list the steps followed by BVM textile division, Sintex Industries Ltd., perform them  and report on the outcome.  Learning  Objective  3:  To  study  and  identify  new  textile  product  under  Technical  textiles  category  where  BVM  textile  division  Sintex  Industries  Ltd.,  can  do/cater  better. 10 
  11. 11. CHAPTER 2: EXPORT PROCEDURE  AND DOCUMENTATION 11 
  12. 12. 2.1 Preamble: In  economics,  an  export  is  any  good  or  commodity,  transported  from  one  country  to another country in a legitimate fashion, typically for use in trade. Export is an important part of international trade. Its counterpart is import. For an export it requires two parties i.e., buyer and seller in there respective countries and an export contract or export order for sale and purchase of goods between them. Goods should leave the customs frontier, of exporting country  involving  load port and discharge port. Value of the goods should  be realized in freely convertible currency. Domestic marketing is concerned with the goods exchanged  with  the  currency  of  the  country  that  is  in  Indian  Rupee.  But  in  export marketing,  the  goods  have  to  be  sold  in  freely  convertible  currency;  i.e.  United  States dollar ($), European Euro, etc. The goods leave the customs frontier of India first and the money or the value comes later on. In other words though it is also a sale of goods but the value  of  the  goods  sold  or  the  money  practically  comes  in  exchange  of  the  shipping documents and not in exchange of goods. Hence in technical terms it is termed as “sale of documents”.  It  is,  therefore,  proved  beyond  doubt,  that  the  sale  of  Documents  is  the backbone of International Marketing whether it is export or import. 2.2 Preparation to enter the international marketplace: A  step­by­step  guide  led  the  company  BVM  textile  division  Sintex  Industries  Ltd. through the process of exporting product to an international market. Following steps are maintained  to  succeed  in  highly  competitive  international  market.  Each  step/section completed before to start the next section. STEP 1: Select the most exportable products to be offered internationally. To identify products with export potential for distribution internationally, company need to consider products that are successfully distributed in the domestic  market. BVM as a most  renowned  producer  of  corduroy  entered  international  market  and  the  product targeted  need  for  the  purchaser  in  export  markets  according  to  price,  value  to customer/country and market demand. And has consider to ask questions like,  ü  What are the major products that business sells?  ü  What products have the best potential for international trade? STEP 2: Evaluate the products to be offered internationally. 12 
  13. 13. Identifying products with export potential that is list the products that believe to be have export potential. Yarn­dyed and solid­dyed fabrics in different plain and textured weaves including  leno  weaves  which  are  already  being  produced  for  various  high  end  fashion labels  both  in  Europe  and  USA,  with  an  equally  strong  presence  among  the  Indian brands.  BVM  has  recently  added  two  new  product  lines  to  its  already  existing  varied product  range.  Coated  fabrics  –  which  covers  Poly  Urethane,  Water  repellent,  Water proofing  and  pigment  coating  to  serve  a  variety  of  end­uses  in  fashion  apparels  like outerwear,  sportswear  etc.  and  also  few  industrial  applications  like  automobile  covers, soft luggage, canopies etc. Jacquard fabrics – in which BVM is producing designs both in  yarn­dyed  and  solid  dyed  shirting  using  Ne  50/1  as  the  main  warp  count.  While entering into these categories BVM has considered questions like,  ü  What makes company products unique for an overseas market?  ü  Why will international buyers purchase the products from our company?  ü  How much inventory will be necessary to sell overseas? STEP 3: Select the best countries to market company product. While selecting a buying/exporting country market factor assessment of that country and rating  has  to  be  made.  While  targeting  Buyer/exporting  market  following  checklist  are considered.  v  Demographic/Physical Environment:  ü  Population size, growth, density  ü  Urban and rural distribution  ü  Climate and weather variations  ü  Shipping distance  ü  Product­significant demographics  ü  Physical distribution and communication network  ü  Natural resources.  v  Political Environment:  ü  System of government  ü  Political stability and continuity  ü  Ideological orientation  ü  Government involvement in business 13 
  14. 14. ü  Attitudes  toward  foreign  business  (trade  restrictions,  tariffs,  non­tariff  barriers, bilateral trade agreements)  ü  National economic and developmental priorities STEP 4: Determine Method of Exporting A firm can use direct export, indirect export or deemed export method. Since BVM is a textile  manufacturing  company  and  it  can  use  any  method  for  exporting.  BVM  started exporting  its products to United States of America (USA), European Union market like United  Kingdom,  France  Italy,  Germany  and  Asian  countries  include  Srilanka, Bangladesh,  Turkey.  Keeping  in  mind  the  strength  and  ability  to  produce  a  variety  of products  for  the  fashion  industry,  BVM  structured  a  supply  arrangement  with  high­end Italian fabrics manufacturer Canclini Tessile SPA. STEP 5:  Building A Distributor or Agent Relationship. Following descriptions talk more about  foreign  sales  agents/distributors  and  agents/distributors  of  BVM  textile  division Sintex Industries Ltd. 2.2.1 Foreign sales agents: (selection and appointment between BVM and Overseas sales agents: Export  success  often  depends  on  representation  overseas.  Picking  the  right  sales  agent, distributor,  or  other  business  partner  is  not  easy  and  yet,  critical.  Therefore,  it  pays  to look at the nature of overseas reps. 2.2.1. a Why sales agent? “Products  don’t  sell  themselves,  however  well  designed  and  competitively  priced  they  1 may  be,”  writes  O.  Mary  Hill  .    The  best­designed  and  most  competitively  priced products  do  not  sell,  if  not  backed  by  an  adequate  sales  force.  Therefore,  selecting training and supervising a sales force has increasingly come to occupy an important place in doing business. The appointment and maintenance of sales force on a company’s pay roll is very expensive. Then, it is not always possible and economic to have sales force all over the  world.  The  natural  solution  lies  in  the  people  who  work on  commission  basis, 1  Professor, department of trades and commerce, Ottawa. 14 
  15. 15. they are known as sales agents (and/or distributor). However large a firm is or howsoever ambitious  its  export  plans  are,  the  appointment  of  commission  agents  is  essential  for successful selling. Overseas agents normally called Sales ambassadors cut the company’s selling  cost.  Being  always  on  or  near  the  market,  they  help  in  obtaining  latest  market information  and  marketing  strategy.  They  are  sales  ambassadors  available  at  a  much cheaper  price.  Overseas  agents  selected  and  appointed  with  care,  may  help  company grow in short span. The job of these agents is to advise the firm on the right methods and strategy for selling in their territory. 2.2.1.b Types of agents: The  agents  are  of  two  types,  the  commission  agents  and  distributors.  Every  export company has to be cautious about selection of overseas agents. What type of seller agents a firm should have depends upon the products it wishes to sell. The choice between the two depends primarily on the type of product an exporter firm offer. If the product is one that is sold mainly to consumers, an agent is probably the logical choice because he can keep  in  close  touch  with  local  retailers  and  keep  informed  about  changing  consumer tastes.  The  distributor,  on  the  other  hand  is  well  set  up  to  sell  consumer  durables  and other product that require servicing a those designed for industrial users.  2 Following table  differentiates commission agents and Distributors. Sl.  Commission agents  Distributors 1  They  are  solicits  orders  and  passes  on  to  A distributor buys the product and sells at his  exporters.  own account. 2  The  agents  neither  takes  title  to  the  goods  The  distributor  maintains  stocks,  sets  the  nor does he assumes the credit.  resale  price  and  sells  through  outlet  at  his  own terms. 3  The agent gets agreed rate of commission  The  distributor  purchases  the  products  at  price  or  gets  a  higher  rate  discount  than  agent’s commission. 4  An  agent  seldom  provides  any  servicing  Distributor has invariably such arrangements.  facility. 2  th  Ram Paras, “EXPORT what, where, how” 29  edn. Anupam publications 1998­99 pg no. 81­85. 15 
  16. 16. 2.2.1.c Sources of information: Names  of  agents/Distributors  for  making  the  final  choice  can  be  had  from  different sources, namely: ­  ü  Country’s trade commissions abroad and/or the country’s trade representative  in  the exporter’s country.  ü  Manufacturers/exporters of related products but not directly competitive products.  ü  Chamber of commerce and trade associations abroad.  ü  Export promotion councils and Commodity boards.  ü  Through advertisements in export trade and specialized international journals. Agent  and  Distributor  relationships  are  best  governed  by  a  binding  contract  or  an agreement.  A  competent  attorney  with  international  trade  experience  must  draw  it  up. This  must  be  done  carefully  since  most  non  Anglo­Saxon  countries  take  a  far  looser interpretation of contract terms. 2.2.1.d Checklist for Agent/Distributor Agreements: The first and most important consideration textile company BVM made is to ensure that the  agreement  clearly  states  what  the  relationship  actually  is  agent  or  distributor.  The rights  and  duties  of  the  two  different  relationships  are  very  significant.  Given  this distinction,  the  agreements  should  state  very  plainly  and  clearly,  what  relationship  is being established. The following basic items are included in a foreign sales agreement:  ü  Date when the agreement goes into effect  ü  Duration of the agreement  ü  Provisions for extending or terminating the agreement  ü  Description of products included  ü  Definition of sales territory  ü  Establishment of a policy governing resale prices  ü  Maintenance of appropriate service facilities  ü  Restrictions  to  prohibit  the  manufacture  and  sale  of  similar  and  competitive  products.  ü  Designation  of  responsibility  for  patent  and  trademark  negotiations  and/or  policing 16 
  17. 17. ü  The assign ability or non­assign ability of the agreement and any limiting factors  ü  Designation of the country of contract jurisdiction in the case of dispute  ü  Determine whether the relationship is exclusive versus non­exclusive  ü  State which geographic regions are to be covered  ü  Set forth issues of payment for the products (in the case of a distributor) and for  payments of commissions (in the case of agents)  ü  Determine the currency in which payments are to be made and address currency  fluctuation issues  ü  Provide specific provisions regarding renewal of the agreement, including specific  parameters for performance, promotional activity and notice of desire to renew  ü  Establish  a  specific  provision  for  termination  of  the  agreement  and  for  what  reasons, i.e., failure to perform to the terms of the contract. (Be careful with this  provision.  Some  foreign  countries  restrict  or  prohibit  termination  without  just  cause or compensation.)  ü  Outline the termination process for the end of the agreement period  ü  Provide for workable and acceptable dispute settlement clauses  ü  Assure that the agreement addresses whether or not intellectual property rights are  being licensed or reserved  ü  Do not allow, without sellers consent, the contract to be assigned to another party  (sub­agents or sub­distributors) to be used to fulfill obligations in the contract or  the  contract  to  be  transferred  with  a  change  of  ownership  or  control  over  the  agent/distributor After  all  consideration  company  selected  foreign  sales  agents/distributors  in  countries like  United  Kingdom,  Germany,  United  States  of  America  (USA),  Turkey,  Bangladesh Srilanka,  Singapore  and  Malaysia.  The  value  or  product  based  commission  is  made depending on total sales contract by agent/distributor. The commission percentages vary between 3% to 5%. The above­mentioned steps are followed  for all  new country where company  BVM  can  cater.  Once  export  order  has  been  settled  the  company  look  upon terms  of  payment  for  payment  terms.  In  following  paragraphs  terms  of  payment  for export quotation, Export documentation and INCOTERMS used in export execution are discussed. 17 
  18. 18. 2.3 Terms of payments: It is necessary to stipulate the terms of payment in the export quotations. The following are basic methods of collecting payments for exports: ­  v  Cash  in  advance­a remittance  by the overseas  buyer at the time or at some time  before shipment.  v  Documentary  letter  of  credit  established  by  the  buyer  in  favor  of  the  exporter  enabling  the  payment  to  be  collected  immediately  after  presentation  of  the  required document.  v  An  irrevocable  letter  of  credit  cannot  be  cancelled  or  amended  without  the  consent of the beneficiary.  v  A revocable  letter of credit can  be  settled or cancelled  by the  buyer at any time  without the consent of beneficiary  v  Bill of exchange  1.  A  D/P  bill  (document  against  payment)  drawn  “at  sight”  requiring  the  bank  to  obtain  payment  before  delivering  the  shipping  document  to  the  buyer.  2.  A  D/A  bill  (document  against  acceptance)  drawn  for  payment  within  a  specified  period  e.g.,  60  days  after  sight.  In  the  case,  the  shipping  document  is  delivered  to  the  buyer  after  his  acceptance  of  bill.  The  exporter is then relying on the credit worthiness of the buyer. 2.3.1 Open account:  3 Open  account  is  similar  to  the  ordinary  system  of  selling  on  credit  in  the  domestic market. No bill of exchange  is drawn and the overseas  buyer pays on the remittance on receiving  the  goods  or  at  a  certain  times  afterwards,  e.g.,  as  sales  are  maid  from  a consignment stock. This method is very riskier and is generally done between firms with long established transaction business. 3  th  Ram Paras, “INCOTERMS 2000 Export costing and pricing”, 14  2000 edition, Anupam Publishers, New Delhi, pg. 48­49. 18 
  19. 19. 2.4 Export Documents: Following documents are required to be sent by a seller to the buyer in discharge of his export  obligations.  Secondly  it  is  only  through  the  shipping  documents  that  seller  or exporter is able to exchange the same for his Export sale proceeds or value of the goods; The  same  documents  are  required  by  an  importer  from  an  exporter  for  taking  physical possession/delivery of goods from the ship or Airplane.  Hence there lies the undoubted importance of documents. Importance of Shipping Documents include, the documents are the  authenticated  and  valid  proof  of  shipment  in  exports.  They  create  the  title  of  the goods. The documents help a seller to realize export sale proceeds  in exchange there of through the bank. 2.4.1 Overseas Sales Contract: It is a principle document that has to be prepared by exporter, after acceptance of an order by Importer/Buyer. 2.4.2 Invoice: It  is  a  principal  commercial  document.    An  invoice  is  a  Bill  /Cash  Bill  or  Cash  Memo through which the original owner of the goods creates and transfers their ownership to the new owner (buyer) by showing as “sale”.  This is the invoice through which the title of the goods is passed on from seller to the buyer. As may be seen from Performa of invoice (See  appendix­1)  name  of  the  seller  (exporters),  buyers  (consignee),  goods  sold,  rate applied and total amount are shown. 2.4.3 Packing List: It is a principal commercial document. The list certifies the nature of packing of exported goods with markings. They are on for easy identification, safer and smoother handling so as to withstand  hazards of  sea and  multiple  handling  involved  in export shipment. (See appendix­2). 19 
  20. 20. 2.4.4 Certificate of Inspection: It is a principal commercial document.  In order to ensure that the goods, so ordered, by the  buyer  should  conform  to  quality  and  quantity  as  per  export  order,  a  pre­shipment inspection,  at  load  port,  takes  places  by  the  designated  inspection  agency  or  authority. After  this  inspection  the  designated  agency  issues  a  certificate  of  inspection  certifying that  the  goods  were  inspected  quantitatively  and  qualitatively  at  the  load  port  and  it conform to the quality standards laid in export contract. 2.4.5 Insurance Certificate: It is a Principal commercial document.  In order to cover the risks involved in shipment of export cargoes when the goods have been either put on board the vessel or when they are  on  high  seas.  Marine  insurance  is  taken  either  by  the  exporter  or  the  importer depending upon the payment negotiation. Following risk covers are taken: a) Accidents, fire. b) Riots c) Rain or Flood. d) Damage to the goods due to damage to the ship or ship when sinks e) Piracy f) Maritime Risks The  insurance  company  issues  a  Marine  insurance  policy  covering  above  risks  to  the goods as also insurance certificate. Hence the importance of insurance certificate. 2.4.6 Bill of Lading: It  is  a  principal  commercial  document.  It  is  a  valid  and  authenticated  evidence  of shipment; it is a through bill of lading that the title of the goods is created from a seller to the buyer. This the bill of lading, among other documents, which helps the buyer to claim the  value  of  the  goods  so  exported  in  exchange  there  of.  Bill  of  Lading  carries  certain endorsements  by  master  of  vessel  as,  “freight  to  pay”  in  case  of  FOB  terms  “freight prepaid “in case of C&F or CIF terms. 20 
  21. 21. 2.4.7 Liner Bill of Lading: This  Bill  of  Lading  is  used  and  issued  by  a  shipping  company  for  its  vessel,  which  is sailing on regular basis on specific points i.e. port to port. 2.4.8 Charter Party Bill of Lading (Cogenbill): This  bill  of  lading  is  issued  by  a  vessel,  which  has  been  chartered  (hired)  specifically from  desired  ports  of  loading  to  the  desired  ports  of  discharge.  This  is  governed  by charter party terms on which it has been chartered involving rate or payment for charting, rate of loading, discharge and demurrage or dispatch etc at respective ports. 2.4.9 Certificate of Origin: It is a principal commercial document.  This certificate is required for proving the origin of the goods where they are produced for export.  In view of bitter relations between two neighboring  or  otherwise  countries,  importing  countries  make  a  stipulation  that  the ordered  goods or  even  packing  material  for  the  exportable  goods  should  not  have  been procured  from one particular country  i.e. enemy  country.  Hence  lies the  importance of certificate of origin. 2.4.10 Bill of Exchange: It  is  a  Principal  commercial  document.    This  is  the  bill  of  exchange  through  which negotiable.  Documents  are  given  or  delivered  in  exchange  of  payment.  A  demand  is made on the bank/payee to make the payment as per the  invoice or other documents. A bill of exchange  is  made  in 2­3 originals and presented as  many times  for realizing the payments in case first bill of exchange remains unpaid. 2.4.11 Shipment Advice: It  is  a  Principal  commercial  document.  After  the  shipment  has  been  effected  by  the exporter, the buyer become anxious to know the arrival of the goods at discharge port in his  country.  Hence,  he  stipulates  in  the  Letter  of  Credit  that  an  exporter  should  advice him suitably so that he keeps himself ready for receiving the cargo. As may be seen from 21 
  22. 22. shipment advice following information is made available to the importer well before the consignment arrives,  a)  Name of the vessels (with voyage number),  b)  Port of loading and port of unloading/discharge,  c)  Final destination,  d)  Name of the goods, number and kinds of packages, quantity, rate, amount etc.  e)  Negotiation of documents if involved 2.4.12 Proforma Invoice: It  is  an  auxiliary  document  and  can  be  termed  as  a  “Kaccha  Invoice”.  This  is  the proforma invoice through which the buyer is guided to open the letter of credit in favor of the  beneficiary  i.e.,  exporter.  Proforma  invoice  also  guides  the  exporter  to  make  the invoice. 2.4.13 Shipping Instructions: It is an Auxiliary document where by shipper or exporter notifies the shipping company, about  the  shipment  of  his  cargo.    In  other  words  through  the  shipping  instruction  the shipper books suitable place on a particular vessel for his cargo. 2.4.14 Insurance Declaration: This is a sort of an offer from a shipper to take insurance cover or policy for the goods to be shipped. 2.4.15 Intimation for Inspection: After the L/C has been established by a buyer, as per the contractual terms, he desires the pre­shipment export inspection at  load port and he nominates an agency  for getting this inspection  done  from  the  designated  agency.    The  shipper  requests  the  agency  through this  letter  to  carry  out  an  inspection  so  that  the  goods  are  inspected  and  certificate  of inspection is received by him. 22 
  23. 23. 2.4.16 Shipping Order: It  is  an  auxiliary  commercial  document.    The  shipping  company  gives  an  offer  to  the exporter for the shipment of their goods in his vessel.  After accepting his offer exporter gives  him  shipping  instruction which contains all useful  information regarding  mode of payment, shipment date, document enclosed, insurance etc. 2.4.17 Dock Receipt or Mate’s Receipt: It is a valid proof given by master of vessel or the person in charge in vessel to whom an exporter hands over his consignment or shipment. It is just as a supporting or an auxiliary by  which  exporter  gets  the  bill  of  lading  from  the  shipping  company  in  exchange  of mates receipt. 2.4.18 Application for Certificate of Origin: As  the  name  itself  says  applying  for  the  certificate  of  origin.    It  is  an  application submitted  by  an  exporter  addressed  to  secretary  (chamber  of  commerce  or  any  other authority) requesting for the issuance of certificate of origin. 2.4.19 Letter to the Bank for negotiation: After  the  shipment  is  made  exporter  wants to  realize  export  sale  proceeds  of  the  goods shipped as soon as possible.  For that he has to enclose a number of shipping documents including  bill  of  lading,  Invoice,  bill  of  exchange,  certificate  of  origin,  packing  list, certificate of inspection, certificate of insurance etc. along with the letter of negotiation. Through  this  letter  exporter  gives  information  to  the  bank  regarding  term  of  payment whether D.A or D.P or any other mode or L/C. If it is L/C, type of L/C whether Payable at  Sight  or  Transferable  L/C.    This  letter  includes  information  on  realization  of  value facilitate banker and in turn helps exporter in getting faster payment. 2.4.20 Exchange control Declaration GR form (Guaranteed Receipt): It is a regulatory document prescribed  by  Reserve Bank of India (RBI) the exporter, as seller/consignor of the goods gives an undertaking to the RBI guaranteeing that he will realize the value of the goods within a maximum period of 180 days. 23 
  24. 24. 2.4.21 Insurance Premium Payment Certificate: It is a regulatory document required by government.  As the proof that exporter has made insurance  of  the  goods  shipped.    It  is  a  preventive  measure;  Government  makes  it compulsory  on  the  part  of  shipper  to  take  insurance  cover  so  that  maritime  risks  are covered. 2.4.22 AR 4/4 form: It is a regulatory document through which shipper or exporter declares the export value of excisable  goods  and  excise  duty  payable  etc.    It is  through  this  document  that  exporter takes out the goods meant for export, out of his factory, after completion of central excise formalities. 2.4.23 Shipping Bill: Shipping  bill  is  a  regulatory  document  through  which  an  exporter  submits  the  goods meant for exports to Customs authorities.  On this document shipper declares the goods as  if  dutiable  or  duty  free  ex­bond  export  duty  if  any  etc.    After  satisfying  himself  the customs officers at the port clears the goods for export and endorse as “let export”. Also through  the  shipping  bill  the  dock/port  charges  payable  are  paid  for  final  shipment.  At some ports this document  is called shipping  bill  at others  it  is called dock challan or at others port trust copy. 2.5 Incentives and Duty Drawback: Incentives and duty draw back schemes from foreign trade policy have provided support for exporters. Normal  incentives given  by government  for exporters and duty drawback schemes are discussed here. 2.5.1 Incentives. 2.5.1 a General Incentives Several no tax incentives in the form of capital subsidies and credits are offered by the central and state governments in the interest of developing backward areas, exports or some specific industries. No distinction is made between domestic and foreign investors. 24 
  25. 25. 2.5.1.b Regional Incentives Industrial units that are set up in specified backward districts are  eligible  for  a  central  government  subsidy  on  their  fixed  capital  investment  and  for financing  from  national  financial  institutions.  The  central  government  also  grants  a transport  subsidy  in  certain  selected  areas.  In  addition,  the  state  governments  offer various types of incentives and facilities, such as land on concessional terms, water and power  at  reduced  rates,  concessions  in  sales  tax  and  octroi  (a  levy  of  duty  on  entry  of goods. 2.5.1.c Special Industry Incentives Certain industries, example jute textiles, are eligible for  concessional  credits  in  the  form  of  soft  loans.  Some  others,  e.g.,  tea  plantations. 2.5.1.d  Export  Credits  Export  incentives  take  the  form  of  cash  assistance  or  cash compensatory support on exports of certain items, duty drawback, i.e., a refund of central excise  and  customs  duties  levied  on  raw  materials  and  components  used  in  the manufacture  of  exports,  import  replenishment  to  replace  imported  raw  materials  and components  used  in  the  manufacture  of  exports,  airfreight  subsidy  on  the  export  of certain products, special treatment  for export­oriented units  for  import of raw  materials, and  credit  facilities  from  approved  financial  institutions  at  pre­shipment  and  post­ shipment stages. 2.5.2 Duty draw back. Drawback  means  taking  back  or  claiming  back. It  is  an  accepted  proposition  under  the customs  legislations  of  all  most  all  countries, and  WTO  compatible, that  duties  of customs  and  other  taxes  like  VAT, Excise, Sales  Tax  etc., as  applicable, if  paid, on imported  goods, re  ­exported,  on  imported  and/or  domestic  materials  used  in  the manufacture  of  the  finished  export  goods,  On  indigenous  goods  exported has  to  be granted  as  drawback, upon  export/reexport  so  that  it  is only  the  goods  that  get exported/reexported, from  the  country  of  export, and  not  the  taxes  on  the goods themselves  or on  inputs  used  in  the manufacture  of  the  export  goods. 25 
  26. 26. 2.5 Export terms of delivery: Principle and approach to export should consider three important conditions viz. 1.  What  charges  and  expenses  will  be  incurred  by  both  the  exporter  i.e.  seller  and  the importer i.e. buyer. 2. When and where the delivery of goods will take place. 3. When and where the title of the goods passes from exporter to the importer 2.5.1 INCOTERMS: Terminology used by exporters: International  traders  use  a  widely  agreed­upon  shorthand  type  of  terminology  called INCOTERMS to define the basis for the sale. Once the buyer and seller agree on one of these  terms,  it  will  clarify:  (1)  where  in  the  journey  the  seller  releases  the  goods to the buyer;  (2)  what  charges  and  documentation  are  the  seller’s  responsibility  prior  to  that point;  and  (3)  what  charges  and  documentation  are  the  buyer’s  responsibility  after  that point. An INCOTERM is always paired with a location and is meaningless without it. For instance,  FCA  Ahmedabad  is  quite  a  different  price  from  DAF  Bangalooru.  The International Chamber of Commerce released the first version of INCOTERMS in 1936. Periodic revisions have been necessary due to innovations such as intermodal containers, blended rail/sea cargo rates, roll on/roll off vehicles, and electronic data interchange. The latest version is INCOTERMS 2000. Certain INCOTERMS in widespread usage tend to persist  despite  the  revision  process.  If  a  term  that  do  not  able  recognize,  such  as  C&F Ahmedabad,  then  trading  partner  may  simply  be  using  an  earlier  version  of INCOTERMS.  Trading  partner  might  speak  of  a  price  that  is  CIF  Bangalooru  Airport, although the current modern term is CIP New Delhi Airport. 2.5.2 The Structure of Incotrems:  4 Incotrems  are grouped into four different categories, starting with the term where by the seller only makes the goods available to the buyer at the sellers own premises (the “E”: ­ term  Ex  works);  followed  by  the  second  group  where  by  the  seller  is  called  upon  to deliver the goods to a carrier  (CHA) appointed by the buyer (the “F”: ­ terms FCA, FAS 4  th  Ram Paras, “INCOTERMS 2000 Export costing and pricing”, 14  2000 edition, Anupam Publishers, New Delhi, pg.64­67. 26 
  27. 27. and FOB); continuing with the “C” terms where the seller has to contact for the carriage, but without assuming the risk of loss of or damage to the goods or additional cost due to events occurring after shipment and dispatch (CFR, CIF, CPT and CIP); and  finally the “D” terms where by the seller has to bear all cost and risks needed to bring the goods to place of destination (DAF, DES,DEQ, DDU and DDP). Accordingly, the four categories are:  v  “E”­ terms EX works where under the seller only makes the goods available to the  buyer at the sellers own premises.  v  “F”­terms  FCA,  FAS  and  FOB  where  by  the  seller  is  called  upon  to  deliver  the  goods to a carrier appointed by the buyer.  v  “C­terms CFR, CIF, CPT and CIP under which the  seller  has to contract for the  carriage,  but  without  assuming  the  risk  of  loss  of  or  damage  to  the  goods  or  additional cost due to events occurring after shipment and dispatch.  v  “D”­ terms DAF, DES, DEQ, DDU and DDP whereby the seller has to bear all  Cost and risks needed to bring the goods to the place of destination. Following are the few thumbnail examples for the Indian exporter’s perspective: ·  EXW Ahmedabad means, "Here are the goods; come and get them." Any export  permits are the buyer’s concern; seller does not even have to load the truck. ·  FCA  Ahmedabad shows where goods properly  cleared  for export will  be turned  over  to  the  main  carrier  for  shipment  abroad.  Whatever  means  of  conveyance  picks  up  the  goods  from  seller’s  place  of  business,  exporter  pays  any  cost  of  loading  it aboard. If  main  carrier does  not provide cargo pickup services  free to  the  exporter,  he  pays  cost  of  inland  delivery  to  that  carrier’s  terminal  in  Ahmedabad.  Overseas  buyer  is  liable  for  transportation  and  insurance  expenses  once main carrier receives the cargo. ·  CPT Ahmedabad means the vendor’s price includes freight all the way there, but  insurance is up to the buyer. Seller has no stake in insuring anything past the point  where he turns the cargo over to the export carrier. 27 
  28. 28. 5 Table: The following table  sets out the above classification trade terms:Group E  Departure:  EXW Ex Works (…named place) Group F  Main carriage unpaid:  FCA Free Carrier  (…named place)  FAS Free Alongside Ship (…named port of shipment)  FOB Free On Board (…named port of shipment) Group C  Main carriage paid:  CFR Cost and Freight (…named port of destination)  CIF Cost Insurance and Freight (…named port of destination)  CPT Carriage Paid to (…named port of destination)  CIP Carriage and Insurance Paid to (…named port of destination) Group D  Arrival:  DAF Delivered at Frontier (…named place)  DES Delivered Ex Ship (…named port of destination)  DEQ Delivered Ex Quay (…named port of destination)  DDU Delivery duty unpaid (…named port of destination)  DDP Delivery duty paid (…named port of destination) ·  CIP Ahmedabad means vendor’s price includes freight and insurance all the way  to Buyer destination. Once it comes over the ship’s side or down the plane’s ramp  at the other end, the buyer takes full possession. ·  DAF  Ahmedabad  means  vendor’s  goods,  properly  cleared  for  export;  will  be  at  border point ready to cross over to the other side. Vendor will bear all costs and  risks of moving goods across the border and beyond. ·  DDU Ahmedabad means that transport of the goods all the way inland to buyer is  paid for by the seller, although the city is not the place of entry. Getting the goods  through customs is the buyer’s responsibility and at the buyer’s expense. 5  Ibid.  28 
  29. 29. ·  DDP  Ahmedabad  means  the  exporter’s  delivered  price  includes  customs  duties  and surcharges in the country of destination. Exporter also bears the risk that his  goods may be rejected by customs for whatever reason (diseased fruit, inadequate  product labeling, banned ingredient, lower­than­expected quota, etc.). ·  FAS  Ahmedabad  means  the  price  includes  delivery  to  a  point  alongside  the  vessel, whereupon ownership of the cargo passes to the buyer. Any export permits  are  the  buyer’s  concern.  (Documentary  evidence  of  FAS  compliance  is  a  clean  dock receipt, with no shortages or damage apparent.) ·  FOB  Ahmedabad  means  the  vendor  undertakes  to  get the  cargo that  is  properly  cleared  for  export  loaded  onto  the  outbound  vessel.  (Documentary  evidence  of  FOB compliance is a clean on­board bill of lading.) ·  CFR  Ahmedabad  means  the  vendor’s  price  includes  ocean  freight  all  the  way  there,  but  the  insurance  is  up  to  the  buyer.  Exporter  has  no  stake  in  insuring  anything  past  the  point  where  he  turns  the  cargo  over  to  the  export  carrier.  (Documentary  evidence  of  CFR  compliance  is  a  clean  on­board  bill  of  lading  showing freight prepaid to the destination port.) ·  CIF  Ahmedabad  means the  vendor’s price  includes  freight and  insurance all the  way there. Once the cargo passes the ship’s rail at the destination port, it belongs  to  the  buyer.  (Documentary  evidence  of  CIF  compliance  is  a  marine  insurance  certificate  plus  a  clean  on­board  bill  of  lading,  showing  freight  prepaid  to  the  destination port.) ·  DES  Ahmedabad  means  the  buyer  will  take  ownership  of  the  goods  while  they  are still on board the vessel in the destination port, before unloading. ·  DEQ  Ahmedabad  obliges  the  vendor  to  get  the  export  cargo offloaded  onto the  quay or wharf at the other end before passing ownership to the buyer. Since goods  are  normally  liable  for  import  duties  as  soon  as  they  touch  the  wharf,  DEQ  Ahmedabad duty unpaid is a modification that relieves the seller of responsibility  for getting the goods through customs. Normally it is in the exporter’s interest to insure any portion of the cargo movement for which he could be held liable under the INCOTERM. However, the CIF and CIP terms are the only ones that assure the buyer that the exporter has obtained insurance. 29
  30. 30. 2.6 Steps involved in execution  of export order in BVM textile division Sintex Industries Ltd : The following flow chart shows the steps followed by Sintex Industries Ltd., BVM textile division  Spec sheet (sample spec) from buyer  Sample preparation (seller, BVM)  Approval/Negotiation stage (Marketer BVM)  (If Sample confirms)  Overseas sales contract (OSC), if need more  information for LC prepare Perfoma Invoice  And order for Production (PPC)  (If order confirms)  Pre shipment invoice (PI), Package list,  Weight cum packing list are transferred  to custom house agent (CHA)  Payment terms  100% advance (TT), Cash against document  (CAD) or against letter of credit (LC)  Preparation of Application for Removal of  Excise (ARE) form Excise extension  The products are now transferred from BVM  warehouse to CHA warehouse. (Continued in next page..)  30 
  31. 31. Continued.  Shipping bill (Airway bill/Bill of lading) are  prepared for custom clearance by CHAAfter custom clearance CHA transfers goods to Air/Ship line to export on receipt of Airway bill/Bill of Lading.  No. of documents to be prepared In case of  Bill of Lading – 3 original documents  Air way bill – 1 original documents Exporter BVM prepares post shipment invoice (By informing buyer, Importer.) All the documents (Shipping bill, PI, Packing list, Wright cum pkg list, Airway Bill, etc.) are to be forwarded to bank for payment Exporter Bank transfers above documents to Importers Bank for verification and transfer of negotiated amount to A/c of Exporter Mean time Exporter, BVM prepares BANK CERTIFICATE for Incentives by Govt.  Execution of Export Order.  31 
  32. 32. CHAPTER 3: TECHNICAL TEXTILES AND NEW PRODUCT  IDENTIFICATION 32 
  33. 33. 3.1 Introduction: “Technical”  or  “industrial”  textiles  represent  a  significant  proportion  of  total  textile activity.  In  2006,  estimates  suggest  it  accounted  for  some  30%  of  end­use  fiber consumption. Because of the industry’s strong growth, demanding technical requirements and close working relationships  between suppliers and  customers,  many  segments offer long­term potential for all companies. 3.1.1 Industry Definition: “Technical textiles” comprises a diverse range of  manufacturing  activities tied to broad end­use  markets.  The  industry  embraces  products  ranging  from  the  mundane,  such  as wiping  cloths  to  the  spectacular  such  as  heart  valves,  aerospace  composites  and architectural fabrics. The supply chain that connects fiber producers with end­use markets is a  long and complex one. It embraces companies  vast and small  from  fiber producers through  yarn  and  fabric  manufacturers,  finishers,  converters,  and  fabricators  who incorporate technical textiles  into their own products or use them as an essential part of their  business  operations.  The  common  characteristic  that  unify  all  technical  textile applications, activities and companies is the use of fibers, often engineered in fiber, yarn and  fabric  form,  to  provide  specific  technical  performance  characteristics  to  meet  the final  customer/  market  requirements,  either  as  a  final  product  in  themselves  or  as  a component  in  another  product.  Below  are  two  definitions  of  technical  textiles  and industrial textiles: Technical textiles:  6 Textile materials  and products intended for end­uses other than non­protective clothing, household  furnishing  and  floor  covering,  where  the  fabric  or  fibrous  component  is selected principally but not exclusively for its performance and properties as opposed to its aesthetic or decorative characteristics. Industrial textiles:  7 A  category  of  technical  textiles  called  industrial  textiles  used  either  as  part  of  an industrial process or incorporated into final products. 6  th  Textile Terms and Definitions, TI, Manchester, 10  Ed… 7  Textile Terms and Definitions, TI, Manchester, 10 th Ed. 33 
  34. 34. 3.1 Table: Technical textiles sector and markets: SECTOR  EXAMPLES  MARKRTS Earth Work  Linings, Netting, Insulation,  Roads, Water Engg, Tunnel,  Artificial grass (GEO TECH)  Stabilization, Soil etc. Constructions  Insulation, Roofing Mat  Building firms, Architect etc.  (BUILD TECH) Agriculture  Sun protection or Green house  Farming, Horticulture, Fishing  fishing nets (AGRO TECH)  etc. Transport  Car mats, Linings, Airbags, Fire  Cars, Aero planes, Boats etc.  resistant, Seat covers (TRANS  TECH) Medical and health care  Bandages, Medical sutures  Hospitals, Nursing house,  (MED TECH)  House hold (first aid) etc. Protection  Safety nets, Tapes, Fire  Industry, Children ware,  resistance, Seat covers (PRO  Public procurement etc.  TECH) Packaging  Twines & Cordages, Sacks &  Distribution, Household etc.  Bags, Tarpaulins (PACK  TECH) Military & Public  Fire services, Bullet proof Army  Military, Security, Forestry, services  tents, Parachutes (MILI ECH)  Off shore industry etc. Specialized Clothing  Sports, Skiing, Leisure, (SPEC  Active sports, Mountaineering  TECH)  etc. Communication  Optical fibers, Image conductor,  Communication sector, Media  Image cables, (COMM. TECH)  entertainment etc. Industry  Filter, Auto mobile, Conveyer,  Engineering, Plastics,  Abrasive belts (INDO TECH)  Textiles, Mining, Energy etc Furnishing  Inter lied, braiding, curtains,  Decoration, Household etc umbrella’s, textile wallpapers  (FURN TECH)  34 
  35. 35. In identifying a product under broad area of Technical textiles Sector, company searched carefully  all  the  available  methods  of  producing/manufacturing  technical  textiles.  After thorough research company decided to cater in to flame retardant performance technical textiles  for  defense  use  under  coated  textiles.  Since  company  has  already  on  to  coated textiles  it  become  competitive  advantage  to  produce  the  cost  effective  performance technical  textiles.  In  the  present  scenario  company  has  installation  to  do  coating  on  all types  of  different  fabrics  like  Cotton,  Polyester,  Denim,  Canvas,  Poplin,  Sheeting’s, Nylon etc.  With facility to coat from thin to very thick i.e. 5 GSM to 1000 GSM and will coat up to 1800 mm. width (180 ms) with different type of designs. 3.2 Plan to enter coated technical textile market: BVM  textile  division  Sintex  Industries  Ltd.,  to  cater  in  to  new  segment,  performance technical  textiles  under  coated  textiles  will  maintain  following  steps  to  enter  coated technical textile market. 3.2.1 Focus At Initial Stage As  above,  company  understood  that  it  will  do  different  kind  of  coatings  and  will  cater different industry also but initially we have to focus few specific targets only and put our efforts in below applications initially.  1)  Rainwear  (coated Raincoats, Jackets, Auto Covers etc.)  2)  Fashion &Apparel (Coating on any fabric including Sports Wear, Shirting, Jackets  etc.)  3)  Flexible Luggage & Umbrella  4)  Defense (Military Tent, Uniforms etc.). 3.2.2 Points need to consider at the time of Coating Inquiry It is important to consider following four points at the time of buyer and supplier inquiry.  ­  Type of coating require  ­  Coating Grams per Square Meter (GSM)  ­  End use of the product and  ­  Customer’s swatch & Parameters. 35 
  36. 36. 3.2.3 Market entry: To  target  all  three  segment  (Fashion  Apparel,  Industrial  &  Defense),  company  has developed  few  verities  and  will  develop  new  qualities  for  potential  customers  on  a regular basis.  For buyers  coating details  in excel  sheet of Cotton and Synthetic  verities, company prospectus and details about development in coated fashion apparel are sent to put into the market. For defense company has started internal procedure for registration. Once  the  target  market  has  decided  company  will  use  will  maintain  following  steps  to enter technical textile market.  Source nominated fabric suppliers of nylon and polyester Identify chemical suppliers for coating  Design website/web design for product  Design a product catalogue  Find the technical intelligence required for R&D  Identify/search prospective buyer  36 
  37. 37. Conclusions: 37 
  38. 38. At  each  and  every  aspect  we  require  some  kind  of  theoretical  knowledge  as  well  as practical  knowledge.  It  means  only  classroom  lecture  may  not  be  enough  to  get  proper knowledge, either in business field or in a social corporate world. Theoretical lecture and classroom discussion of various kinds are not enough for a student and that is why from the practical point of view an industrial internship and preparing a report on analysis is a practical learning for a student. Hence, after successful completion of industry internship in BVM, textile division Sintex Industries Ltd., Kalol, Gujarat following conclusions are made.  Ø  Export  marketing  division  of  BVM,  Textile  division,  Sintex  Industries  Ltd.,  follows  all  the  export  documents  that  are  required  for  export  execution.  The  company utilizes its production at three fronts, domestic supply constitutes 20%,  direct export 20% and deemed export constitutes other 60%.  Ø  For Coated technical textiles Fabric Company is at Infant stage (Introductory) in  PLC  (Product  Life  Cycle)  of  BVM,  textile  division  Sintex  Industries  Ltd.,  and  need  to  nurture  every  step  with  proper  planning.  Company  focusing  on  Defense  and  Industrial/Technical  fabric  also  along  with  Fashion  apparel  verities  and  so  require  more  concentration  to  get  success  and  to  trap  diversified  business  in  a  long run. 38 
  39. 39. APPENDIX: 39 
  40. 40. APPENDIX­1: PROFORMA INVOICE Manufacturer / Exporter  Invoice No.& Date  Exporters Ref. SINTEX INDUSTRIES LTD.,  PI/TEX/03/2003­04  IEC NO:­0888003447 Textile Division : BHARAT VIJAY MILLS  12.03.2004  RBI CODE NO:­AS 001989 Near Seven Garnala,  Buyers Order No. & Date : Kalol, (N.Gujarat) 382 721, INDIA Tel.: 00 91 2764 223 731 ­ 36,220 246, 220793  Other references (if any) : Fax : 00 91 2764 220 436 E­Mail : bvm@sintex.co.in  Buyer (if other than consignee) Consignee  Country of Origin of Goods  Country of final Destination  INDIA  Terms of Delivery and payment Pre­Carriage by  Place of Receipt by pre­carrier Vessel/Flight No.  Port of Loading : Port of Discharge :  Final Destination: Marks & Nos.  No. & Kind of Pkgs.  Description of Goods  Quantity  Rate  Amount /Container No.  (Specification)  MTRS  (Price)  (VALUE)  USD PAYMENT : OUR BANK DETAIL OUR BANK A/C NO. TOLLERANCE Amount Chargeable (in words) PACKING :  FOR BHARAT VIJAY MILLS Declaration :  Signature & Date We declare that this invoice shows the actual price of the goods described and that all particulars are true and correct.  AUTHORISED SIGNATORY 40 
  41. 41. REFERENCES: 41 
  42. 42. Internship Company: Bharat Vijay Mills (BVM), textile division Sintex Industries Ltd., Kalol, Gujarat Export documentation and Technical textiles: 1.  Albaum  Gerald,  Jesper  Stranskov  and  Edwin  Duerr.  “International  Marketing  and  rd Export Management”, 3  ed. MA: Addison­Wesley, 1998. 2.  Baker,  James.  C.  “International  Finance:  Management,  Markets,  and    Institutions”, NJ: Prentice Hall, 1998. 3.  Berry,  Brian  J.,  Edgar  C.  Conkling  and  D.  Michael  Ray.    “The  Global  Economy  in  nd Transition”, 2  ed., NJ: Prentice Hall, 1997.  th 4.  Daniels,  John  D.  and  Lee  H.  Radenbaugh.  “International  Business”,  8  ed.  MA: Addison­Wesley, 1998. 5.  Eiteman,  David  K.,  Arthur  I.  Stonehill,  and  Michael  H.  Moffett.  “Multinational Business Finance”, 8th ed. MA: Addison­Wesley, 1998. 6.  Fatehi,  Kamal.  “International  Management:  A  Cross­Cultural  and  Functional Perspective”, NJ: Prentice Hall, 1996. 7.  Gibson,  Heather  D.  “International  Finance:  Exchange  Rates  and  Financial  Flows  in the International System”, NY: Longman, 1996. 8.  Gerald  Albalm,  Edwin  Dueer  and  Jesper  Strandstov,  “International  Marketing  and  nd Export management”. 2  edition. 2001. Pg 42.  nd 9. Hill, Charles W.L. International Business: Competing in the Global Marketplace.  2 ed. IL: Irwin, 1997. 10.  Koshy  O  Darlie,”  Garment  Exports:  Winning  Strategies”,  1st  edition,  1997  Pg.  35­ 50.  th 11.  Melvin,  Michael.  International  Money  and  Finance.  5  ed.  MA:  Addison­Wesley, 1997.  th 12.  Quelch,  John  A.  and  Christopher  A.  Bartlett.  “Global  Marketing  Management”,  4 ed., MA: Addison­Wesley, 1999. 13.  Ram  Paras,  “Export­Import  finance  and  Letter  of  Credit  (L/C)”,  1999  edition,  abc Anupam publications. New Delhi. 42 
  43. 43. 14.  Ram  Paras,  “Incoterms  2000,  Export  costing  and  Pricing”,  14th  2000  edition,  abc Anupam publications. New Delhi.  nd 15. Shukla R.S, “How to Export Garment Successfully”, 2  edition, 1997. 16. “The stitch Time”, Vol. 3 issue, July 2005, Pg. 24­28. 17. Vernon, Raymond, Louis T. Wells, Jr. and Subranian Rangan. “The Manager in the  th International Economy”, 7  ed. NJ: Prentice Hall, 1996. Other references: www.sintex.co.in www.google.co.in www.rollyo.com www.ldec.org www.vivisimo.com www.grokker.com 43 

×