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How You Can Help if Disaster Strikes Weston

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Presentation given 12/3/13 covering emergency preparedness considerations for Weston, MA residents and Weston Emergency Reserve Corps volunteers.

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How You Can Help if Disaster Strikes Weston

  1. 1. What If…? How You Can Help if Disaster Strikes Weston Presented by the Weston Emergency Reserve Corps, Weston Board of Health, and Preparedness Specialty Services
  2. 2. WERC Weston Emergency Reserve Corps • The Region 4A Medical Reserve Corps - Weston Branch was created by the Weston Board of Health in 2006, its development guided by Wendy Diotalevi and Liisa Jackson. • In 2007, the branch adopted the working title Weston Emergency Reserve Corps (WERC) to reflect the breadth of its mission: to strengthen the town’s public health infrastructure and improve emergency preparedness. It does this by arranging for the coordination, training, and mobilization of medical and non-medical volunteers to be able to support disaster preparedness, relief, and recovery, emergency medical assistance, and public health outreach.
  3. 3. WERC Executive Committee
  4. 4. WERC’s Greatest Hits • • • • • Area Deployments, incl. 2008 Ice Storm Flu Clinic Facilitation MYCHIP Child ID Program with Masons Family Emergency Prep Kit Father’s Day Sale Local Sheltering Assistance during Storms & Other Power Outages • Town-wide Emergency Planning Support • Neighbor Brigade Collaboration • Training & Drill Participation (e.g., Natick Labs)
  5. 5. What can happen in Weston?
  6. 6. Possible Disasters • • • • • • Ice Storms Snow Storm Hurricane Floods Tornados Water supply contaminated • Tanker truck turnover • Terrorist event • Infectious disease outbreak • Bio-terrorism • People fleeing from Boston to Weston
  7. 7. MRC 101 Liisa Jackson President of Preparedness Specialty Services
  8. 8. MRC 101- Basics  What is the MRC? NEIGHBOR HELPING NEIGHBOR  Who should join? ANYONE and EVERYONE  What are MRC Volunteer requirements? INTEREST AND DESIRE TO HELP  What is the Role of the MRC? SUPPLEMENT FIRST RESPONDERS
  9. 9. MRC 101- STRUCTURE Promoting a culture of service, citizenship and responsibility DHS / EPR / FEMA National Citizen Corps Council Corporate Support Charter Federal Partners Affiliate Programs DOJ / NSA DOJ / IACP DHS / State & Local DHHS / OSG State Citizen Corps Councils Tribal / Local Citizen Corps Councils American Public
  10. 10. MRC 101- Liability • Federal Volunteer Protection Act (42U.S.C.§14501 et seq) – immunity from liability for negligence for people who volunteer for a government entity or a non-profit organization • Good Samaritan Laws (state laws) – protect health care workers from liability when they render emergency care or treatment. Coverage depends on there being an emergency • Massachusetts Tort Claims Act (M.G.L. c. 258) – Public employees are protected from liability for negligent acts or omissions if they acted within the scope of their employment
  11. 11. MRC 101- Liability IMPORTANT to REMEMBER • State Emergency Declarations: During a large scale emergency, there will most likely be special legislation or Executive Orders to help assure volunteers that they will have liability protection, but not likely Workman’s Compensation Insurance • There is NO Workers’ Compensation protection in most situations for MRC volunteers.
  12. 12. MRC 101- Core Competencies 1. Personal Protection Protocols (PPP) 2. Personal/Family Protection Plan 3. Chain of Command 4. Role of MRC in emergencies 5. MRC Communication protocols 6. Mental/Behavioral Health 7. Volunteer Activation and De-Activation 8. Personal Limitation Awareness
  13. 13. MRC 101- Core Competency 1 Personal Protection Protocols (PPP) Personal Protection Equipment (PPE) Take care of yourself first Ask for appropriate Personal Protection Equipment (PPE) training Know the proper way to put on and take off masks, gloves and goggles. (Generally masks go on first and come off last.)
  14. 14. MRC 101- Core Competency 2 Personal / Family Protection Planning What to have in your: HEAD HANDS HOME
  15. 15. MRC 101- Core Competency 2 Personal / Family Protection Planning  Prepare yourself first!  Family Emergency Plans  Child Care Plans  Caring Networks of friends and family  Be a good neighbor  Learn about local emergency plans  Volunteer to help
  16. 16. MRC 101- Core Competency 2 Personal / Family Protection Planning “Go Kit” that includes family health and financial information, emergency radio, flashlight, snacks, space blankets, supplies and funds to provide basic support for you and your family (including pets) for several days if you must leave home
  17. 17. MRC 101- Core Competency 2 Personal / Family Protection Planning  Emergency Supplies to last 3 to 12 weeks Weekly – add canned/paper goods to pantry/under bed be sure to address specific family needs /pets Rotate your supplies as needed
  18. 18. MRC 101- Core Competency 3 Chain of Command Governor Massachusetts Emergency Management Agency (MEMA) City or Town Chief Elected Official (CEO) City or Town Emergency Management Director (EMD) Incident Commander or Unified Command
  19. 19. MRC 101- Core Competency 3 Chain of Command - Incident Command System Incident Commander Public Information Officer Safety Officer Liaison Officer Operations Planning Logistics Finance Administration
  20. 20. MRC 101- Core Competency 3 Chain of Command – ICS Staff •Incident Commander Unified Command •Public Information Officer provides communications/ public information services •Safety Officer responsible for Responder safety only •Liaison Officer coordinates with other Responder Agencies •Intelligence Officer responsible for coordinating sensitive information
  21. 21. MRC 101- Core Competency 3 Chain of Command – ICS Staff •Operations Section Chief in charge of the actual response •Planning Section Chief in charge of planning for the next operational periods •Logistics Section Chief in charge of obtaining needed men and supplies •Finance/Administrative Section Chief in charge of expenses and keeping records
  22. 22. MRC 101- Core Competency 3 Chain of Command - ICS Unity of Command – one leader Modular – expands and contracts as needed Life Safety Code: 1st- responders must protect themselves/other responders Then protect lives of victims Then control the Incident Finally, protect property and the environment Span of Control – each person is in charge of no more than 5 to 7 people and reports to only 1 person. Use of Common Terminology – for positions, procedures and equipment
  23. 23. MRC 101- Core Competency 3 Chain of Command – ICS Management Operating Procedure Establish Command Ensure Responder Safety Assess Incident Priorities Determine Operational Objectives Develop and Implement an Incident Action Plan (IAP)
  24. 24. MRC 101- Core Competency 4 MRC Role in Emergencies Provide support and assistance to Incident Commander Volunteers will be assigned duties and task as the IC or Section Chiefs decide CBRNE Emergencies [All hazards approach] possible evacuation and surge support for Chemical - Biological – Radiological – Nuclear – Explosive Natural Disasters
  25. 25. MRC 101- Core Competency MRC Role in Emergencies- Stages 1. Planning/Preparation • Update the strategic and operational plans • MRC units should be advocates and partners in the planning for All Hazards
  26. 26. MRC 101- Core Competency 4 MRC Role in Emergencies- Stages 2. Response • Emergency Operations Center (EOC) • Control the Incident – MRC Roles • Provide a community reservoir of trained, credentialed volunteers • Staff Emergency Dispensing Sites (EDS) • Staff Influenza Specialty Care Units (ISCU) • Support Local Board of Health (LBOH) • Support Sheltering Efforts
  27. 27. MRC 101- Core Competency 4 MRC Role in Emergencies- Stages 3. Recovery • Bring things back to normal MRC may have a role in this phase 4. Mitigation • Reduce the effects of an emergency by reducing the number of people and places that will be affected. MRC Units and members should be community advocates for mitigation work.
  28. 28. MRC 101- Core Competency 5 MRC Communication Protocols  Never talk to the media while deployed unless authorized by the Incident Commander.  When authorized to speak to anyone: “Be right Be first Be credible”  Never say “NO COMMENT.” DO Say, “How can I get back to you with that information?”
  29. 29. MRC 101- Core Competency 5 MRC Communication Protocols  Know the communication protocols at the scene and follow them exactly  Learn radio and other communication protocols before using communication equipment  Take time to communicate calmly, clearly and completely with everyone, especially your team members  If uncertain, ask for clarification
  30. 30. MRC 101- Core Competency 5 MRC Communication Protocols Accurate, timely and complete communications are the most difficult part of an emergency response Remember:
  31. 31. MRC 101- Core Competency 6 Mental Behavioral Health Critical Incident Stress Happens to responders as well as victims Stress is normal Stress is a normal person’s normal reaction to an abnormal situation Exercise •Take care of yourself, take breaks, eat right, •Stress can often lead to substance abuse (food, alcohol, drugs, cigarettes, etc.). Don’t use “a little something to take the edge off”
  32. 32. MRC 101- Core Competency 6 Mental Behavioral Health - Behavioral Health First Aid Take additional trainings Be calm, considerate and compassionate Giving someone a drink of water can be important and just what they need Never tell a victim that you know just how they feel Acknowledge their problems and when possible, give them something constructive to do Be aware that in a serious crisis, all affected people take in, process, and act on information differently. It is normal to see behavioral extremes and have difficulty communicating
  33. 33. MRC 101- Core Competency 7 MRC Volunteer Activation/De-Activation Procedures  Activation procedures – Volunteers requested by State, Board of Health, Emergency Management Director, or Hospitals – Volunteers contacted by phone, email, text or through MA Responds  Keep your contact info up-to-date  To learn more about preparedness go to: www.ready.gov
  34. 34. MRC 101- Core Competency 7 MRC Volunteer Activation/De-Activation Procedures  Report when and where instructed NEVER self deploy  Ask about getting through security and parking  Carry proper photo I.D., including a current MRC Badge if available  Bring along some basic supplies clothing, food and water - in case supplies are limited
  35. 35. MRC 101- Core Competency 7 MRC Volunteer Activation/De-Activation Procedures  ALWAYS sign-in with the Volunteer Coordinator at the Command Post or Staging Area safety, available resources, record-keeping  Know who you report to and follow instructions you could be assigned any job no matter what it is, it is important and needs doing  Always sign-out with the Volunteer Coordinator before you leave or go off duty safety, record keeping and resource management
  36. 36. MRC 101- Core Competency 8 Personal Limitation Awareness  Know your physical and emotional limits – don’t become part of the problem  Know your training limits – stay within scope of training/skills – just-in-time training provided – for critical tasks – necessary to protect yourself and others  If you are unsure, ask Remember, you are responsible for protecting yourself first and then others
  37. 37. Breaking news This Super Storm of 2014 has brought widespread devastation to all of New England during the last 24 hours. The freezing rain has coated trees, power lines and roads with ice causing wide spread power outages, downed trees and dangerous driving conditions.
  38. 38. MRC Sheltering Scenarios Get to know everyone in your group Read your scenario Discuss how you would handle this situation [5 minutes] Choose a spokesperson There is no “right” or “wrong” answer
  39. 39. How would we help? • • • • • • Provide sheltering Provide basic medical care Provide warming and charging stations Provide food and water Provide accurate information Provide resources to recovery
  40. 40. What to do NOW Plan for the future • Notification – – – – • Need for sheltering How will it be accomplished Where to go / hours of operation How to get transportation Volunteers – notification, scheduling Educate your residents • Let them know the rules/limitations in advance – No pets, provide own food, care for own pet • • • Responsible for monitoring own food allergies Responsible for own personal items Shelter rules – No smoking, drugs, weapons, alcohol
  41. 41. Possible Disasters • • • • • • Ice Storms Snow Storm Hurricane Floods Tornados Water supply contaminated • • • • Tanker truck turnover Terrorist event Bio-terrorism Infectious disease outbreak • People fleeing from Boston to Weston
  42. 42. MRC 101 Thank you very much for your time! Liisa Jackson President of Preparedness Specialty Services http://preparednessspecialtyservices.org/ LiisaJackson@comcast.net # 774-278-0059

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