Quantifiers unit 0

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Quantifiers unit 0

  1. 1. QUANTIFIERS
  2. 2. quantifiers Quantifiers are words that are used to state quantity . They answer the questions "How many?" and "How much?" Quantifiers can be used with plural countable nouns, uncountable nouns or both.
  3. 3. Large quantities (+) Use a lot of/lots of : They have a lot of/lots of money. Lots of is more informal. Use a lot when there is no noun: I like speaking in English a lotMainly used in affirmative sentences.
  4. 4. Large quantities: (-) & (?) Use much with uncountable nouns. Do you watch much TV? I don’t have much money. Use many with countable nouns. Are there many students in your class? There aren’t many cafés near here. In both cases you can also use a lot of.
  5. 5. Small quantities Use a little with uncontable nouns. Would you like some sugar in your coffee? Just a little please. Use a few with countable nouns. This town has a few good restaurants. few and little can be pre-modified by very. Hurry up! We have very little time.
  6. 6. More than you need or want. Too + adjective. I won’t buy this shirt. It’s too big for me. It’s too expensive. I can’t afford it. Too much + uncountable noun. What I don’t like about big cities is that there is too much traffic and too much noise Too many + plural countable noun. What I don’t like about big cities is that there are too many cars and too many people.
  7. 7. Less than you need. Not enough + noun There aren’t enough car parks in this city. Sorry, I havent got enough food for everyone. Adjective + enough Youre not working fast enough, you wont finish on time
  8. 8. Some, any,no + -body / -one, +-thing, + -where The compounds of some, any and no behave in the same way as some any, and no, that is to say, some-, in affirmative sentences, any-, in negatives and questions, and no (with affirmative verb) although we use some- in the interrogative to offer something, to ask for something or when we expect a positive response, as we saw in the previous unit. Examples: I saw somebody there. I did not see anybody there. Did you see anybody there? I saw nobody Would you like something better? Nothing is better than that
  9. 9. Any, no, not any No means the same as not any, but is more emphatic. He has got no friends. (More emphatic than He hasn’t got any friends.) any can be used before a singular countable noun with the meaning of it doesnt matter who/which/what.

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